(Closed) Bees under 26-Did you have to get your own Health Insurance once you got married

posted 5 years ago in Legal
Post # 46
Member
6889 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

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Apple_Blossom:  So if using my example employer has to pay $4000 which say they hand that cost down to the employee with family while say employee  is using my example from today.  Employee only was again using the example of the group I worked on today was 700 how is that cheaper?  Because it isnt.  So just because you can stay on your parents plan and your parents can and are paying for your insurance when you are legally an adult and have the ability to drive/drink/have babies/get married or serve our country but you can’t pay for your insurance?  

Family coverage is always more expensive than employee coverage.  I have never in my almost 10 years in putting in rates for insurance seen a rate cheaper for employee vs family coverage.  

Post # 47
Member
47293 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

I have never understood why so many Americans would rather the unemployed, the poor, and lower to middle income working  people, go without proper health insurance (and by default, often proper healthcare) than have a national healthcare system that provides the same access and the same care for all.

When I read these comments it reflects the above. Bees would rather a young couple pay an exhorbitant amount for their own insurance than use the insurance their parents have, which is legally available to them. Bees who can’t even construct a legible sentence are criticizing another Bee for not standing on her own two feet.

It’s such a sad situation.

Post # 48
Member
2454 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2017

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Sassygrn:  I think you are misunderstanding me.  I am making several assumptions- namely that the EXTRA paid for a family plan (not just the base for the employee) is less than what an individual would pay.

Let’s use your example.  Employee only is $700.  Family (which I assume includes spouse?) is $4000.  So that’s an extra of $3300.  This covers the spouse and any other dependents.

Unless there is extra paid for every child added, it’s doesn’t matter if there is one child or 20- it’s still $3300.  In this case, there is no reason for one of the under 26-ers to pay extra for insurance.  Total cost for all people involved (employee+dependents) would exceed $4000, as the “adult” child is still paying greater than $0.

Now how about when part or all of that extra is paid just to keep that one dependent on?  If the dependent can find cheaper insurance (less than $3300) and is the ONLY one who benefits from that extra paid, it makes more financial sense to go with the cheaper individual plan.  But let’s assume that the individual insurance they find is more than $3300.  Let’s say it’s $3800- that’s the plan offered by their employer.  What makes more financial sense in very basic math, if all else is equal?  Stay on the parents plan, which would be $3300 for that one person, or take the individual plan for $3800?  If you say the individual plan, that would be incorrect, and would essentially be “throwing money away” as was previously stated.

Note: I’m not advocating that the parents continue to pay for their child’s part of the insurance if said individual got married.  I’m just saying that if the parents are willing, it may make better financial sense to stay on the parent’s plan.

Post # 49
Member
814 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

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SammiCoJo:  yes you can stay on your parents insurance! I got married last summer at 23 and I’m still on my parents insurance. My mom gets excellent benefits through her job, whereas my hubby’s is terrible and would be crazy expensive to add me to his plan..like over $300/month when we currently pay $120 for just him! My parents premiums are the exact same whether I’m on their plan or not and they have no issue keeping me on it, as my mom and I are both in healthcare and know the importance of health insurance! 

Post # 50
Member
814 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

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NFLwidow:  just because I stay on my parents insurance until I’m 26 doesn’t mean they’re paying any hospital bills for me! I actually spent a few hours in the ER about a month ago and just got the bill. Guess what..my husband and I are paying for it, NOT my parents!

Post # 51
Member
4238 posts
Honey bee

 

mrsdfarrar: sure, you may be paying the hospital bill.

I only pointed out that by having a parent be the policyholder, and the married adult child remain a beneficiary on that policy, they are exposing their parent to financial risk. That is not “smart” finance for the parent. If the parent wants to act emtionally and not economically, so be it. But the proverbial umbilical must be cut at some point; that is the way of the world.

Nothing personal.

 

Post # 52
Member
4238 posts
Honey bee

 

melissa & tinatiny: while I agree that “the general public” may be getting their information from the jon stewart show or the 6 o’clock news or wherever, and never fact check for themselves, I still take issue with those who act as “judge and jury” over another’s citizen’s right to liberty and pursuit of happiness, according to their own conscience. Not everyone agrees with socializing the cost of health insurance, which, by its nature, is already aggregating costs for the pool of insured. ijs

 

Post # 53
Member
882 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

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Sassygrn:  what skin is it off your nose what OP does? You act like this money is coming out of your pocket. 

I’m sure you are correct that family coverage has more expensive premiums than employee only but if OP leaves her parents plan that may not necessarily change anything for them. Some employers offer Employee+Spouse but some only offer Employee+Family. Regardless, it will probably not be a huge difference in premiums to keep her on the plan and would be helpful to her, considering how expensive it is to get coverage for an individual, even through your workplace.

Your arguments don’t hold water because parents often want to help their children out as much as possible when they are first starting their own family and there is nothing wrong with that. I work full time and my husband goes to school full time. We bust our asses to do it on our own and for my husband’s birthday every year, his mom pays his car tags and auto insurance. We could handle it on our own but it sure is nice that we don’t have to. 

There is a difference between making a financially sound decision to stay “dependent” in some aspects versus just riding your parents checking account while you still can. 

Post # 54
Member
882 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

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NFLwidow:  not really. If you incur medical costs and you are an adult then the costs are billed to you, not your parents. It makes no difference who is included on the policy. That’s like assuming that since your child is on your insurance policy, they will be financially responsible for your medical bills.

The only way OP’s parents will have to deal with anything as far as her medical bills go might be forwarding her EOB statements that come to their address. 

Post # 55
Member
11519 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: May 2014

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SammiCoJo:  I was covered by my dad’s until I graduated university at 22, I think my coverage under him would have stopped at 21 if I hadn’t been in school (maybe it was 25 but because I didn’t live at home I didn’t count…I don’t remember for sure)

Either way, I got lucky and the first job I had after graduation had good medical benefits.

I would check your dad’s specific plan and make sure the age cut is 26 – don’t trust everything you see on the internet 😉

I would also be pretty confident in saying that once you’re married you can no longer be called a dependent of your father and therefore wouldn’t be covered under his plan.

Post # 56
Member
15002 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

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Apple_Blossom:  Yes, thank you, that is exactly what I meant. 

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Sassygrn:  This thread isn’t a discussion about having insurnace or not.  It was being covered under your parents or your own plan, no where did say it was a good idea to not have any insurnace at all.  We don’t know if OP has a younger sibling on her insurance plan, but if she did, then it does NOT cost her parents or her parents employer anymore to cover another child.  With my company, it’s cheaper to go from a spouse plan to a family plan than for individual coverage, so even if it did cost them anything, it would still be less, and if coverage was better as OP mentioned, then why not stay covered and give them money for the extra premium instead of buying my own plan.  As for the extra a company has to pay… the day any corporation cares more about me as an individual and my well being than their own bottom line, is the day I give a crap about how much more they have to pay for family covereage, one that anyone in in their complete right to elect.

Post # 57
Member
1111 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2015

our parents are allowing us to stay on till we are 26 since their plans dont cost any more or less with us on it …. When a baby comes around I will have to re look into what wI’ll be best but for now no baby planned and we are staying on we will be 22 and 23 when married 

Post # 58
Member
15002 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

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NFLwidow:  I only pointed out that by having a parent be the policyholder, and the married adult child remain a beneficiary on that policy, they are exposing their parent to financial risk.

How does this expose the parents to financial risk.  A medical bill is billed toward the individual.  Insurance deducts and covers what it will, then the hospital bills the patient, and no one else.  The hospital doesnt bill the policy holder for any remaining balance.

Post # 59
Member
48 posts
Newbee

To the posters who philosophically object to the OP remaining covered under the family policy, can you explain the test that you use for determining what expenses should be carried by someone in the position of the OP?

what do you say to parents who assist with house deposits, loan guarantees, car usage, use of frequent flyer points, use of holiday houses, free childcare, employment in a family business? How are these actions qualitatively different from insurance? 

To the posters who believe that the OP is exposing her parents to extra risk / cost, how can you determine that position without seeing the terms of the policy? I’m assuming you mean that the OP could use up the value of the policy herself with a major accident, but that requires assumptions about a policy that no one here has read. 

if the marginal cost of comparative coverage is cheaper on plan x than plan y then it is, all things equal, sensible to use plan x. 

The topic ‘Bees under 26-Did you have to get your own Health Insurance once you got married’ is closed to new replies.

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