Bees who used a Certified Nurse Midwife (CNM) in a hospital

posted 1 month ago in Pregnancy
Post # 16
Member
881 posts
Busy bee

I had an OB who oversaw a team of midwives at the hospital. I felt like it was the best of both worlds for me. My OB had trained with midwives early in her medical career and worked with them daily, so she had that same warm, friendly vibe and always made me feel like my needs and wants were heard, and didn’t push interventions. But at the same time, knowing I was in the hands of an OB with the training and experience to immediately know what to do if shit happened to go sideways gave me enormous peace of mind throughout my pregnancy and especially labor and delivery. 

Post # 17
Member
3243 posts
Sugar bee

dianaj17 :  I totally agree. People just assume every doctor has the same knowledge, know-how, experience and should all have the same trust. I love the idea of midwives, I don’t really like the idea of an OB delivering but I can’t go through that trauma again. I interviewed about 7 OBs this time and my OB is awesome. He’s very much hands off in the “hey, if that’s what you’re comfortable with, I’m cool with it,” “Yeah of course we can run unnecessary hormone checks if it makes you relax,” type of thing. I have good insurance, let’s use it and keep Mama not stressed out here! So he’s very much on board with a natural birth unless things get crazy and that sort of thing, so I’m grateful. He’s also head of the OB/GYN department at our local college, and hires all the OBs in the hospital group I’m a part of, so he’s very knowledgeable and seasoned (and he has 7 of his own kids that be delivered), which is what I need this time around. He doesn’t normally take patients that are super low risk and “boring” but given the shit show that went on with my son’s birth and my desperate need to deliver in the hospital with the level III NICU, he kept me on! Whew! I definitely couldn’t do a super pushy, or super aloof OB, but I also can’t do a midwife again. The trauma is real, and it wasn’t even *that* close to life and death. But we’re talking about my baby here!

Post # 18
Member
3082 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

chillbee29 :  my husband’s work was about an hour by public transport from our hospital / home. Luckily I went into labour on the weekend both times 

Post # 19
Member
6773 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2015

In response (why can’t I hit reply on my computer?), I used Contraction Timer for my first kid (red icon with a heartbeat line).  Scrolling through my apps, I’m going to assume I used the same thing this time around, because I’m not finding another app, though I could have sworn I got something else.  Anyway it lets you time your contractions and mark how horrible they feel so you notice if they’re feeling worse.  There are a lot of similar apps.

Post # 21
Member
7021 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2015

chillbee29 :  We drove 20 minutes to the hospital from home.  It would have been 40 minutes in traffic, but it was Easter Sunday.  

Honestly, I’m worried about going quicker this time around.  It took my husband about 40 minutes to pack the car up and get the house ready to go after my midwife said “We’ll expect you in the next hour.”  My plan for this time is to pack the car as soon as I’m in labor, alert my daughter’s caregiver as soon as I’m in labor, and so I can still labor at home and go in when I’m ready… not leave 40 minutes later.

If you’re concerned about the distance and mode of transportation, express that with your midwife group.  My midwife group’s rule was 3-1-1.  Contractions every 3 minutes lasting one minute each for 1 hour, then go in.  Depending on the practice, it might be different.  I hear 5-1-1 the most, and 7-1-1 for people who live super far from a hospital.  However, my contractions STARTED at 4-5 minutes apart, even in early labor.  I was so confused, because they were mild (so mild, I even went to Easter brunch and went grocery shopping for my husband’s hospital snacks!).

As for the ride to the hospital, I was doubled over in the back seat the whole time.  When I got to the hospital, they tried to get me in the wheel chair, and I kept telling them “No, that sounds miserable!”  I did not want to sit down.  My contractions were pretty back to back by that time.

Post # 22
Member
8629 posts
Bumble Beekeeper

chillbee29 :  I’m in Boston and used a CNM for both pregnancies. Excellent care both times (and excellent delivery with the first – second is still cooking lol) and they work closely with OB and mfm doctors if needed. I really wanted a minimal intervention, unmedicated vaginal delivery and that is exactly what I got! Planning on another one this spring. 

Post # 24
Member
136 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: July 2014

I saw CNMs and delivered at an inhospital birth center. they were basically just bigger rooms with a tub and no epidurals on the same floor as other L&D rooms. I really loved my prenatal care with the midwives, it’s a big practice and I’ve seen quite a few, and they’re all great. I’m pregnant again and back at the same practice. The CNM group is affiliated with a state of the art hospital with a level 3 NICU. Both Nuchal and anatomy scans are reviewed by perinatalologists and include a consultation with them. 

For delivery, I was just shy of 5cm when I got to the hospital and they were pretty hesitant to admit me. I luckily had a Doula who suggested breaking my water after hours of stalled labor. (20+ hrs in). Once I started progressing they checked in on me more often and I had a wonderful delivery experience. I labored in the tub and then pushed for an hour max on hands and knees. Completely unmedicated, no IV. I did need some stitches which healed super fast and well. 

I think CNMs in a hospital are a great option, however it won’t be as personal as a birth center so I’d still highly recommend a Doula. The CNMs aren’t going to hang out and coach you through your whole labor (niether would an OB). I liked that the NICU and OR were only a floor away instead of an ambulance drive away in case anything went wrong.

Post # 25
Member
8629 posts
Bumble Beekeeper

chillbee29 :  I took a natural childbirth class and did a lot of reading online for mantras, natural pain techniques, etc. And I told my husband all of it as well so he could remind me of my plans while I was in pain! 

Post # 26
Member
696 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2019

 

chillbee29 :  The hour drive definitely worries me, but I also don’t really feel like I have a whole lot of choice. I live in the south, where you don’t tend to have sprawling cities. My medium-size city has two hospitals. They’re very meh, and I have yet to meet anyone who loved their doctor. If any complications arose, a transfer to the city an hour away would be necessary anyhow. Most people I know who have babies opt to deliver in the bigger city and think it was worth it. I definitely plan to ask some questions when the time comes about being strategic with our appointments (as in, let’s not put in extras unless needed), and I know that it would mean not being able to labor at home for very long most likely. I’d rather get there on the early side and not have to deal with transition in the car. The have tubs in every room and are fairly hands off if that’s your preference/it’s all going well, so that doesn’t really concern me too much. 

Post # 27
Member
8629 posts
Bumble Beekeeper

dianaj17 :  as someone who went through transition in the car I completely agree with that assessment lol. I had a very fast labor so it wasn’t an issue of the hospital being too far but I distinctly remember screaming at my husband for not driving the way I wanted him to (i.e. a fuck ton faster and more aggressively – he was under the speed limit and stopping for other people to go even when it didn’t make sense because the midwife on the phone told him to slow down our arrival because they weren’t ready for us yet). My daughter was delivered 30 minutes after our arrival at the hospital though so I felt pretty justified in my yelling! 

Post # 29
Member
696 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2019

LilliV :  I’m already learning, pre-TTC even, that flexibility is key! If I lived 10-15 minutes from the hospital, I’d probably be more apt to decline cervical checks at appointments and labor at home when the time comes. Instead, I’ll probably have to be open to checks (I’m sure they’d want those patients who walk around at a 3-4 for weeks and live far away to come in at the first sign) and come in fairly early to avoid that stress. On this side of things, I think it’s worth it, but who can say. My mom, grandma, and maternal aunt have all had very similar labors (spontaneous labor in week 38-39, ~12-16 hours, no complications), so I’m hoping I follow suit and don’t have a precipitous labor!

Post # 30
Member
8629 posts
Bumble Beekeeper

dianaj17 :  Babies do what they want! I’ve been warned by multiple midwives and doctors that my second child (due in May) is likely to come early (like his sister) and probably even faster! My biggest fear is not getting to the hospital and having a lobby baby a la Seth Myers new comedy special, but my husband keeps reminding me that we are fortunate enough to live in the Boston area with a hospital every 5 feet. I may not get to my PREFERRED hospital, but I will absolutely get to A hospital in a true emergency. 

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