(Closed) Bees with high mileage vehicles…

posted 6 years ago in The Lounge
Post # 3
Member
339 posts
Helper bee

As long as you continue maintenance, it should be just fine! I bought my first car, my 97 Toyota Camry with a little over 140,000 miles. Right now I’m dealing with repairs, but the thing with old cars is every once in a while a lot of routine maintenance of suff that quits working just happens (like my brakes, ball bearings, etc.) I’ve never had any major problems and am almost up to 170,000 miles now! My mom is driving a 2000 Dodge Grand Caravan with over 200,000 miles on it, and it still drives. She’s a careful driver but doesn’t put a lot of money into her car. 

I have no idea about the transmission fluid flush, maybe aske a mechanic? The only thing someone’s told me is that the best thing to do is when you first start up your car, always wait at least 30 seconds or so to let the oil get through the engine before shifting into reverse or whatever. It’s some old neighbor, but I think he may have been a mechanic, and was saying that he’d replaced lots of transmissions but as soon as he started doing that he hasn’t had a problem. Not sure if it’s true but it can’t hurt! 🙂

Post # 4
Member
3241 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

My 2004 Toyota Corolla has 130,000+ miles, my husband’s 2003 Subaru has 240,000+ miles. He does most of the mechanical work on our cars. I think with regular maintenance you should be ok.

Post # 5
Member
1079 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

My Subaru has almost 130,000 miles on it.  She’s still pretty much running like a dream.  Sure I need to do more maintenance on it than you would a new car, but if I average it out to a per month payment it is waaay less than I would be spending on car payments each month.

Post # 6
Member
9549 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2013

I just had an accident that totalled my 2000 Saturn with 140,000+ miles. It was driving perfectly fine prior to the accident. I wouldn’t really consider 84,300 to be very high mileage. In looking for a new car I’ve been doing a ton of research about car reliability. We were only looking at cars with excellent reliability (Toyota, Honda, Subaru, Mazda) and for these cars over 200,000 is expected, 250,000 is a reasonable mileage to attain, and 300,000 miles is not unusual.

That being said, Chevy’s aren’t as reliable so you probably won’t get that mileage out of your car. Consumer Report didn’t review the 2006 Aveos, but they did review the 2007s and the scores for major engine, minor engine, drive system, and electrical system are all the worst score that consumer report gives. The fuel system is still bad, but not as bad as the others. The major transmission repairs were better than average and the minor transmission and engine cooling were excellent. But the real kicker is the bad score on major engine repair. So that is something to keep in mind. But even if it only gets half the mileage of a Toyota, that’s still a lot more miles than you have now.

But if your car is running fine now, it makes sense to keep taking good care of it and you’re likely to get another several years out of it. If it starts needing more and more repairs, then it gets to be time to consider if it’s worth repairing. But you’re about to have it paid off, so I would drive it as long as you can without it being a money pit. According to consumer reports you’d likely only get around $3800-$4100 if you sold it and I think you’ll get more use out of it than that if you drive it into the ground over the next several years.

Post # 7
Member
1251 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 2009

@Stace126:  My toyota is a 2006, I have around 90k miles on it, and I expect it to make it to 200k miles, easily. I have great gas mileage and toyota’s last a long time. I drive my car to and from work (15 miles to, 15 miles from) with no problems.

 

Post # 8
Member
1460 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

I drive a 2005 Saab 95 that has just over 170K miles on it.  I drive a little over 80 miles per day and about half of that is hard stop-and-go traffic.  I have no worries about the car.  I get regular maintenance and she still drives as smooth as the day I brought her home.

I would suggest you skip the transmission flush unless you notice that your gears aren’t shifting smoothly.  Sometimes after they flush the transmission they don’t get a good seal and you end up having to get a new transmission.  They’ve told me, unless I notice a problem, not to touch mine because if that happens it will cost a fortune to fix it because they stopped manufacturing Saabs.  I would be better off getting a new car for the money I would spend.  I’ve never had my flushed and I’ve had no problems.

Post # 9
Member
682 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2013

My ’98 Acura 2.3 CL is a piece of garbage lol it breaks down and need repairs constantly and it’s at about 189,000 miles.  I don’t have helpful advice except I think your car is not really that high in mileage- I got mine at 120,000 my senior year of high school ( 2004) and it ran fine for a few years before it started constantly dying.

Post # 10
Member
100 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

Our car (2000 Toyota something-or-other) has 194,000-ish miles on it, and we’re planning on keeping it for at least another year or two. The car I used to drive was a Saturn that went to around 220,000 before falling apart.

 

I don’t have experience with long commutes, but we go on sustantial road trips a couple times a year and the car has been fine aside from needing some minor repairs. Keep on top of your oil changes (no need for high-mileage oil, though — that stuff’s supposed to be kind of a scam!) and general maintenance, and make sure you trust your mechanic, and you should be fine for quite a while. 84,000 miles is practically new! Wink

Post # 11
Member
246 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

84k really isn’t very much. My husband drives a 1992 (yes, it’s about 21 years old now, and we joke about how it’s old enough to have ethanol in it’s gas now) Toyota Hilux pickup 4×4 to work everyday. I think it has 220-some thousand on it at the moment. The fact that he drives it to work everyday is fairly impressive because we live in the middle of nowhere. Literally. He works at a remote gold mine. The mine is 55 miles by unmaintained dirt road; town is about 130 miles by, you guessed it, unmaintained dirt road. That ancient Toyota is the only vehicle he’ll trust! Older vehilcles are usually built without so many computers, technological gizmos, etc., so they’re a lot easier to fix and there’s less parts to break. It’s never broken down. We’ve added things on and done work to improve it, but we’ve never had to replace a part because it was broken. That’s what I call a quality vehicle. The fact that it has manual everything also helps.

If you live in a climate where there’s a lot of de-icing salt on the roads you might not get super high mileage out of your vehicle. We used to live in the Northeast US, and the engine would be fine, but the frame/ suspension would break in half from rust :/

My somewhat longwinded point is that older vehicles can be super reliable, and as long as it’s protected from rust and properly maintained you ought to get many more miles/ years out of your car!

Post # 12
Member
2488 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

When I was 4 my parents bought a 1989 ford probe and replaced the moter in it. When I was 16 they gave it to me and I drove it for 4 more years before it started having problems and I sold it however it still could have gone forever and it had well over 300,000 miles on it !

Post # 13
Member
246 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

@Stace126:  The transmission flush depends on whether you have an automatic or manual transmission. Automatics need to have the filter changed and sometimes the fluid changed occasionally. Manuals do not. I’d get a well-respected competent mechanic to do the flush/ filter change if you do have an automatic transmission. Like pp said, if they don’t seal it up properly afterwards all your fluid will run out (creating an environmental hazard) and destroying your very expensive transmission.

Post # 14
Member
680 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

I have a 1998 Nissan 240sx and bought it with high miles on it (124,000 at the time, which was 7 years ago).  It now has about 202,000 miles on it and is doing just fine and will probably have hopefully another 5 years in it.  My dad is a mechanic and takes pretty good care of it and I have the oil changed in a timely manner.  I think as long as you take care of your vehicle, it shouldn’t matter how high the mileage gets. 

Post # 15
Member
431 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: November 2014

Haha my parents have a Buick Century and it has well over 250,000 miles and its still kicking!! You just got to keep up with matinance.. some cars seem to last longer that others though! We use to have a Dodge Caravan and after 100,000 miles the tranny went! Crazy!

Post # 16
Member
2743 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2014 - Disney

I have two cars. One is a high mileage 121k jeep liberty 2002. I was putting about 1400 in repairs a year so I bought another jeep as the main driver earlier this year. I drive the old one for errands and 1-2 days a week and the new one to work as the commuter and for long haul trips. These summer trips are why I’ve already put 6k miles into the new car in 5 months. Good news is because she got hit I havent driven her in 3 weeks saving about 600 miles, and it will be 2 more before I drive it again so that 1000 mile trip becomes negligible after this month down :). We are going to also start commuting one day a week together we own 4 cars actually :/ his high mileage car has 160k we put about 2k of work into it a year.

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