(Closed) Best breed of dog to get?

posted 11 years ago in Pets
Post # 32
Member
299 posts
Helper bee

We have two chihuahuas (well, one and a half Chi/half Italian Greyhound!) and the second was a rescue- I HIGHLY encourage adopting a rescue dog!!! There are so many that need good homes! 

However,

I absolutely do not recommend Chihuahuas for couples that want children. I believe that’s common knowledge, but I think ALL dogs under 15lbs should be kept away from kids. For two reasons: one, they are so small that the groping, irresponsible hands of kids scare them and they can resort to aggression to escape or defend themselves, and two, kids are just too rough on them- I’ve seen rescue Chi’s with broken legs because some idiot parent bought their kid a Chi, and they did something stupid to it (I’ve seen an incident where a kid threw the dog off a porch and broke it’s leg- stupid freakin kid).  But you don’t want a small dog, so that’s good!

Norwegian Elkhounds are a lovely, super-sweet breed, and I had them when I was growing up. Such lovely dogs! Great temperment! Also Weimeraners, though they have oodles of energy. Greyhounds are also great, but they are one of those oddball dogs you have to have a thing for! I personally love Great Danes, and haven’t met one that I didn’t like yet, but they are big, and will pass sooner due to their size (bigger the dog, shorter the lifespan). If you have a small house, I’ve seen them walk by tables and knock things off! But you said they are too big anyway, so, lol!

 I do not recommend letting anything smaller than 20lbs roam free (due to predators, you’d be surprised what would go after a small pooch). I don’t recommend a particularly energetic dog unless you have a fenced in yard or plenty of time to walk them and give them the exercise they need. With water- a friend had a Scottish Terrier known for his love of water and swimming abilities. Then they moved to a house with a pool, and the poor thing jumped in and drowned one day. So no matter how strong a swimmer, they should be watched carefully! I don’t think kids under 6 and dogs are generally a good combination- kids can irritate animals unintentionally, and no matter how sweet the dog, they can give a surprise aggressive reaction if frustrated enough. Unfortunately, accidents do happen :/

 

*Also, avoid the words teacup, "-doodle" anything, or combined dog breed names, and allergy free, and such- these are advertisement words, and have extrodinarily bad results when used. There is no such thing as a teacup anything, just dogs bred small and unhealthy, designer dog "breeds" use creative breed name combos to make and sell puppies (a bit unethical), etc. etc. not trying to get preachy, but the effects of such sales tactics are unfortunate :/ 

I hope you find a pup that is perfect for you! 🙂  

Post # 33
Member
2606 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2009

If you are getting a job soon, I definitely would NOT reccomend a Border Collie.  They are great dogs, but because they are so smart and high energy, they need a lot more mental/physical activity than a lot of other breeds.  If you are planning on getting a FT job in the future, probably not the best breed for you.

Someone also mentioned Labradoodles.  Please be aware that these are NOT a breed.  They are mutts, pure and simple.  If you like the looks/personality of this mix, check out a shelter near you.  Way too many people are suckered into buying "Labradoodles" and "Goldendoodles" and "Puggles" and "Cockapoos" and…well, you get the point…because they think they are getting some rare or new breed.  Also, if a dog has fur, it WILL shed, despite claims to the contrary.  And no breed is hypo-allergenic, although many are less likely to trigger allergies, (this is also dependent on the individual person).

I suggest checking out petfinder.com for available dogs near you in the breeds that most interest you.  Also, please do research on any breeds you might be interested in before commiting to one.  If you think breed might be for you, but aren’t quite sure, (or even if you are), consider fostering one or two from a local rescue group to get some experience with the breed without a lifetime commitment to one.  Or, if it turns out to be the right dog for you, there’s no shame in "Foster Failure" (adopting your foster dog).  Our own dog is a "Foster Failure." 🙂

Also, several websites have dog breed selectors, which allow you to enter various information about your lifestyle and what you are looking for in a dog, and will give you some suggestions as to what breeds might be good for you.  They are not perfect, but can give you a starting point for your research at least. 

Good luck!

Post # 35
Member
410 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2010

I love animals! Maybe that id why I worked at a pet store for so long even with my allergies trying to kill me.  But anyways, I wanted to jump on the rescue dog wagon.  Me and my FH adoped a dog from a no kill foster shelter and he is GREAT! He is a boxer mix, about 80ish lbs and a lick monster.  I know people give boxers and pits a bad rep, but if you teach a dog to be good they are. 

If you go the adoption route, just keep your patients and dont give up.  most of the dogs you will run into have been abused in some way.  If you love them they will snap out of it and love you too.  Our baby had really bad seperation anxiety when we first got him, like busting the metal crate bad, but he learned that we were coming home and got over it.  He was house broke when we got him, but he still had some accidents just because of being in a new place and all that.  

I love that you guys are wanting to adopt.  If you have any questions let me know.  And just remember to keep your patients and ask questions.  Make sure the shelter answers all of your question: Does he/she do well with other animals?, are they house trained? crate trained? any medical conditions? recent vaccination forms, tests… I think that about does it!  Good luck

Post # 36
Member
411 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

Please if you do anything tessa, adopt a dog.  If you rescue a dog it could very possibly be saving their life.  I work for an animal rescue and it’s heart breaking to see some very healthy and wonderful dogs go unadopted.  There are hundreds of shelters, rescue groups and adoption drives.  Go to a Petco or Petsmart on any weekend during the day and you should find one.  As for breed, there are so many out there to choose from.  Lab mixes are great.  Our little one is a lab/beagle mix.  She’s 2 and a half now but here’s a pic of her as a puppy.  She was great to train, calm and lovable.  Her only issue is wanting to stop and sniff everything on her walks.

 

[attachment=260692,29966]

Post # 37
Member
2470 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

EAQ — that is HYSTERICAL! FI’s parents have a Cheasepeake Bay Retriever and he can be stubborn too. He’s gettin ga little old and has arthritis but he is a great dog! 

My parents have a yellow lab and he is HUMONGO! Definitely see if you can get a look at the dogs parents first and check out the paws if its a puppy to see how big it will likely become.

I personally won’t get a dog from a shelter but this is DEFINITELY just me. I think every animal needs a home so go see what you can find. The reason I will not go to a shelter is because my aunt’s dog who they adopted had a flashback/episode and attacked my 85 year old grandmother (literally bit right into her neck… less than an inch from the jugular) and then AGAIN attacked my mom giving her a black eye. They think he had a flashback or something triggered his memory and he got violent and defensive. I’m wary of adopting since you don’t know the animal’s past and there is a risk of something like this happening. But again, this is my personal decision from experience. 

Post # 38
Member
512 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

I echo everyone else’s comments regarding getting a rescue/shelter dog.  We have a pit/spaniel (supposedly) mix and she’s WONDERFUL.  I grew up with purebreads but after getting Charlie I will never get another dog that’s not a rescue.

Post # 39
Member
440 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

I would say a beagle or a cockerspaniel – both are good medium sized dogs and cockers are usually pretty intelligent. Neither should have too many fears of water but they are not labradors so don’t expect them to go jump in the lake with you. Both of these usually do fine with moderate excercise. I would recommend if you have never had a dog going to a breed rescue group (just google the breed and the area you live in – they have these all over the country) to get an older dog that is already house broken and just needing a good home. I also like breed rescue groups because usually these guys are not living in a shelter with minimal human contact they are usually living in a foster home and their personalities are more known than most shelter dogs. I am in vet school right now so we do see a lot of cases where people got animals and then just abandon them on the steps of the school (yes people really do this – they will tie them up and just leave them there). Make sure that you are ready to commit time and money. If you are having any financial issues make sure that you can afford this. 

<h4>My average food bill for my 2 dogs can be high! Not to mention the cost of vet care – If you get a puppy you are going to have to do rounds of shots and they have annual vaccinations. Since you live near a lake you probably need to have your animal on a heartworm preventative year round (unless you live somewhere really cold – and then you don’t need it in the winter). Also because you live near a lake odds are that you have snakes. Dogs love to mess with snakes – fortunately a snake bite usually doesn’t kill but is expensive to treat. Grooming is another issue for each of my dogs it cost between $50-75 everytime. And if you have to kennel them for any reason (vacation, house guest etc) you can look at about 20-30 per day. </h4>

 

I say all of this because I see tons of owners who abandon their animal or elect to have them put to sleep for conditions or issues that are 100% treatable but expensive.

 

I am now off my soapbox. 

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Post # 40
Member
107 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: June 2010

I say adopt, I understand GaBGal’s reasoning for not wanting to adopt, and respect that. Something like that would deterr me from adopting too. Most mutt’s from the adoption center are great. Make sure you go to a repatable shelter and talk with the people who work there about your needs. Also spend some time (a few visits) before you take one home for good.  Hope you find the perfect little pup for you!

Post # 41
Member
150 posts
Blushing bee

I have two pound puppies. My pit bull swims like a champ! (the black and white one) We haven’t gotten her to jump in but she loves to run down the boat launch and swim all over the place! My brown mix is quite…buoyant :)….but she would rather wade in the water than do too much swimming.&nbsp;

&nbsp;

I’ve grown up around labs/retrievers. My sister’s lab is crazy and scary, my dad’s golden retriever is incredibly stupid and is not much for the water….with any breed you can get a bad/weird seed.

I definitely say visit your pound!&nbsp;

&nbsp;

[attachment=260736,29969] [attachment=260736,29970]

Post # 42
Member
150 posts
Blushing bee

Oops, here’s the other photo. [attachment=260740,29975]

Post # 43
Member
250 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

I think you’ve got a lot of good suggestions. I’m partial to beagles myself – my pup is a bealge mix. The only caution there is that without a fence, if they ever get loose, they’ll catch wind of a scent and never look back!

Whatever breed you decide, please please go check out some shelters. There are so many loving, sweet dogs out there that need to be adopted. We got ours at the SPCA and he’s the most wonderful, gentle dog I’ve ever seen

Post # 44
Member
2207 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2009

@Galbgal and EAQ – I LOOOOVE Chessies!&nbsp; My baby is a chessie mix and he is STUBBOOOOORRRRN as all hell, but its funny stubborn.&nbsp; He just gives us this look like &quot;You want me to do WHAT?&quot; but then he mumbles and grumbles when you make him do it.&nbsp; I wish we could post video, he seriously grumbles and pouts like a child.&nbsp; It makes us laugh hysterical.&nbsp; He is kinda pouting in teh 2nd pic because Bubba (the puggle) wouldnt play with him and he wanted to play SO BADLY

[attachment=261111,30028] [attachment=261111,30029]

Post # 45
Member
1074 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2009

Just butting in to say ‘ditto’ to NO border collies and NO beagles. We have a (rescue) beagle now and as much as I love her, she REQUIRES a fully fenced backyard and vigilance about making sure she doesn’t get out. They’ve been bred for many, many generations to follow their noses!

Similarly, border collies require a very active household and room to run. They’re so so smart and consequently get bored VERY easily!

Good luck, tessabella!

Post # 46
Member
325 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

Lots of good suggestions already, so I’ll skip most of my advice and just say that Border Collies aren’t always great at being introduced to kids, unless maybe the collie is raised from puppyhood around slightly older kids. My grandparents had a border collie and, while she was a very good dog, her herding instinct was so strong that she would physically push me and my sister all the time, nipping at us like we were sheep if we didn’t go where she wanted (when we were toddlers until we turned about 8). So that’s something to think about if you’re planning on having kids. I’m pretty sure all traditional herding dogs have this instinct to some degree, like corgis, etc. (but at least corgis are short ^_^)

Good luck finding the right puppy for you! ^_^

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