(Closed) Birth Plan (Long) Revised

posted 6 years ago in Pregnancy
Post # 3
Member
2790 posts
Sugar bee

Personally I think it is long. I think some of it is unnecessary to share with your Dr. Things I think you could cut out:

  • The following people will be present during labor and delivery

  • David  (Husband)

  • Fae

  • Christina

  • Carol

Unless you are worried about nosy people entering your room without your permission this is not something your Dr. needs to know. He doesn’t know these people.

  • I would like hypnobirthing play list to be playing 

  • I would like lights to be dimmed

    These are things that you can control when you get there and not something that needs to be addressed previous to you arriving.

  • I would like to handle my pain using the following methods

  • Massage

  • Hypnosis

  • RelaxationBath/Shower

  • Position changes

  • Birthing ball

  • Walking

Unless your asking your nurses to assist in these things you should be free to do so as you please.

 

I think the rest of it is great things to focus on and to stay firm with your Dr and your team. I think some of the above things would be really great things to make sure you share and discuss with your husband so that when your in pain he can advocate for you so you don’t get peer pressured into the more serious things you don’t want. I am very impressed with your vigilance and organization though. Props to you!

Post # 5
Member
9029 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

I agree that this seems long. I also have a birth plan and it is very precise and to the point and fits on one page. My reason for having a written birth plan is to avoid me having to repeat myself over and over. If the birth plan is long winded and they cant get the basics from a quick glance they will probably still ask you about it or not take it very seriously.  Aside from the first sentence most of the first paragraph isnt really necessary. i would work on summarizing it so all the really important facts are easy to read from one page at a glance.

 

 

Post # 6
Member
2095 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

We didn;t have a birth plan. We talked things over with the midwife as each situation occured and chose our best options. Then again I am not a first time mom so I accepted that I would have to go with the flow.

Post # 7
Member
2790 posts
Sugar bee

@MarryMeTiffany:  That sounds like a great idea! Having someone this is family as well as practiced in birthing will be a great advocate for you. Has the hospital said things that make you feel like they will be against some of these things or that they will be pushy towards you? Or are you just being very cautious?

Post # 8
Member
5296 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: January 1993

yeah agreed with other posters – gets a bit lengthy and slightly condescending in a couple parts – (don’t shoot!) –

I do not want my water broken at any time; it will break on its own.

I would like to push when my body tells me to, I do not want to be told to push or be queued by doctor or nurse.

 

what is the overall attitude of your hospital toward (less conventional, let’s call it) your birthing preferences? I know one hospital in my area is very open and ok with all this – they actually have an online pdf asking basically everything you are answering here (Do you want a birthing ball available, do you wish to be able to move/change positions, etc.) But I know the hospital near my hometown is probably much less open/experienced with these ideas.

So long story short, if you have a more open-minded hospital, they would probably have no issues with what you have written out, but otherwise, I can see a little bit of side-eye to you, if that makes sense? I don’t want the staff to get the idea you are trying to tell them how to do their job or think you know more about birth than they do.

 

Best of luck!

Post # 13
Member
5296 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: January 1993

@MarryMeTiffany:  eeeeks. that’s what I wondered. Then I can see being a little more ‘strong’ in your wording.

Post # 14
Member
1115 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2009

@MarryMeTiffany:  Wow, sorry you had such a bad first experience. I try to put Dr. Google aside, and my many bad hospital experiences, and acknowledge the doctors there know more than I do and be cooperative most of the time. Being uncooperative or trying to dictate ANYTHING while in a hospital is a losing battle anyway, and just makes me more stressed and frustrated.

I think if you give this list to your Dr./Hospital, you might be setting yourself up for disappointment. While you certainly have a right to want to do things this particular way and I know you sacrificed and made some adjustments to make this shorter, but it’s still way too long IMO. Even a dr. WANTING to please you would have to be referring back to this list constantly on your delivery day, trying to remember and be courteous of everything that’s on there, so they are likely to forget some stuff or get annoyed with you trying to follow it. The hospital may very well not be so willing, and it might just piss you off even more that you took the time to write out this whole list and then everything on there that isn’t followed is going to make you a big cranky b*** on the day. Especially things like:

  • I would like to push when my body tells me to, I do not want to be told to push or be queued by doctor or nurse.

  • As long as baby and I are ok I would like to push in my own time and not have a time limit on pushing.

So when you’re ready to push, what if there isn’t a doctor in the room? They aren’t going to sit in the room waiting for you to be ready. Then you have to sit there and wait for a Dr. to come in, which from my extensive hospital experience can take up to a half hour even in an emergency situation. Can you imagine laying there for a half hour with the strong urge to push and not being able to? It also just sounds kind of snarky and if the hospital is offended they might make you wait longer out of spite. I also don’t think hospitals have a “time limit” on pushing, but do you really want your baby hanging there halfway out of you while you wait to be ready for the strength for the next push? That can’t be good/dont see the point of this.

All that being said: Our birth plan. Go to hospital and do whatever doctors tell us to have a healthy baby. I know you said you did that the first time and it didn’t turn out so well, but you did get a happy healthy baby, and who knows how it would have turned out if a strict birth plan like this one had been followed instead. Just playing devils advocate.

  • ETA: This is another one: “I do not want pain medication offered to me. I will request it if I needed.”

Why is it so offensive to you to just be OFFERED medication? How hard is it to just politely say no? It’s also asking a lot to have all the newborn procedures done in your presence, I’m sure hospitals have a room set up with everything they need for this, and it would be a huge inconvenience to move all that stuff, IF it’s even all mobile. I also don’t see the point and it sounds really controlling. Do you even know about enough about medicine to know if they are doing something wrong?

 

Post # 15
Member
180 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

@PandasWifey:  ‘“I do not want pain medication offered to me. I will request it if I needed.”‘ We had a long discussion about this during my natural childbirth class and this is one thing I that will definitely include in my birth plan. This is my first pregnancy, but my understanding is that mothers are often overwhelmed during labor and even if the plan is to have an unmedicated birth there is a time that the suggestion is enough to push a mother into accepting pain meds. You can be easily tempted to change plans when tired and in pain. If you are planning/hoping to have an unmedicated birth it is strongly recommended to include this language.

Post # 16
Member
686 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: December 2011

 @PandasWifey:  

  • ETA: This is another one: “I do not want pain medication offered to me. I will request it if I needed.”

Why is it so offensive to you to just be OFFERED medication? How hard is it to just politely say no? It’s also asking a lot to have all the newborn procedures done in your presence, I’m sure hospitals have a room set up with everything they need for this, and it would be a huge inconvenience to move all that stuff, IF it’s even all mobile. I also don’t see the point and it sounds really controlling. Do you even know about enough about medicine to know if they are doing something wrong?

I think Tiffany is right in having this in her birth plan and to be honest I don’t think it’s controlling- I think its smart. It would be one thing if hospitals asked you once if you would like the medication/epidural/whatever they’re offering but they ask you multiple times even if you refuse. They hound you about it because honestly they don’t care if you have a natural birth or even the birth you want a lot of the time- they want what’s going to be easiest for them. And what’s easiest for them will obviously be to “take her pain away” so she doesn’t complain. Since you’re open to whatever the doctor wants, that’ll work for you but its clearly not what she wants so she should say it.

@MarryMeTiffany:  

We have very similar birthplans going into very similar hospitals. I took a comparable approach to MsBrooklynA’s post and deleted everything that we could control ourselves /things I knew the doctor wouldn’t care about. I’m hoping we both get the result we’re looking for- the OB I got stuck with has a C-Section rate higher than 50% because he (his words) “pretty much induces everybody”. Maybe discuss your plan with your team well in advance? That’s my plan to attempt to avoid angry discussions in the delivery room. Good luck fellow October mama!

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