(Closed) Bored at work. Should I move on?

posted 3 years ago in Career
  • poll:
  • Post # 2
    Member
    1011 posts
    Bumble bee

    You won’t get promoted for ten years?

    Post # 4
    Member
    387 posts
    Helper bee

    I’d leave. 

    You admit that you’re bored and that management isn’t giving you new tasks. You aren’t even a year into a job that you were told will send you to management when X retires. You don’t know if that person is retiring or when. The duties that you’re picking up, like getting lunches for bosses, is assistant/secretarial work, not work that a young engineer should be doing. 

    If money is the only reason that you’re staying, then you should be prepared to be incredibly bored at this job until you get your yearly bonus. Is that worth it to stay?

    Post # 6
    Member
    840 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: June 2013

    The grass is not always greener. A new job is a huge risk and can be a complete shit show and you cant just cry uncle and go back. If youre just bored and not actively unhappy, I would stay atleast another year  just so that you dont look flighty on your resume and  you can leave after a promotion with a higher title (and there for start a new job with that title).

     I would not be searching out secretarial lunch duty stuff either. Just pretend to be busy lol. Its part of work sometimes!

    Post # 7
    Member
    458 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: City, State

    harmonicsoul :  I feel like I could have written this post! But I was/am in the opposite situation. I’m over a year out of college now, I started out working in construction/engineering consulting doing marketing proposals. While I enjoyed the work, the company was very small, had extremely high turnover, and was having growing pains on how best to expand which led to a lot of nasty office politics and overall everyone was extremely overwhelmed with their day to day tasks.

    After a certain point, it became obvious to me that it wasn’t a place where I felt I could be successful in the long term. I switched roles to an administrative job at a university, and I love it! The work is way more manageable, and the university structure means that I have way more colleagues and a direct chain of supervisors and management, as well as a growth plan. Because the work is more manageable, there are days where it is certainly slower and perhaps boring, but many people here find productive ways to use their time by taking graduate classes or doing more research into programs or departments that are related to their job (and that is encouraged).

    It sounds like for now the job is working for you (good pay, benefits) but I do think that the high turnover is concerning. Also, it’s a little weird that your boss won’t give you more projects or allow you to shadow him when you ask (I had a similar problem at my last job!). If they really are grooming you for a higher position, you would think they would welcome your interest in taking on more work and going to meetings. 

    If you are content to sort of go with the flow and see where your current position takes you, you could look into taking graduate classes or starting a graduate degree in marketing/construction administration/business or something related. But, I also think in this situation, you very well might find a more challenging work environment if you leave. 

    Also, I should add to your latest update, I switched after less than a year and I had no issues (I accepted the new position before resigning). I think a lot people understand that when you are so fresh out of college, you are still looking for the right fit. So, I wouldn’t worry about having 1 year on your resume versus 10 months, because it doesn’t make that much of a difference. 

    Post # 8
    Member
    3451 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: September 2017 - Poppy Ridge Golf Course

    I’d leave. Not irresponsibly like walking out without another job secured or not providing adequate notice but I simply couldn’t stand being bored at a job where I have to spend 5 days a week of my time. Having to find tasks made me feel as if I were being paid for nothing and even worse the hours seemed to drag on forever. It was actually depressing to me and I value general happiness far more than money. But it all depends on if you can stomach this kind of situation for an extended amount of time. Unless you know there will be a lot of work coming your way in the near future I can’t think of many reasons to stay there.

    Post # 9
    Member
    1011 posts
    Bumble bee

    Went back and re-read.  I got a piece of advice from a VP years ago that I took to heart – during these early parts of your career you need to be looking at your jobs and your companies through the lens of what skills do I want to acquire.  Companies are using your talents, so what are you getting in return?  Getting lunch etc. is probably not a skill you are trying to acquire and hone and not one that is going to propel you to the next level.

    Do you have a good network established within the company?  I think you should reach out to some folks to try to get the inside on what the deal is with why your department doesn’t have much going on.  Also you need to figure out informally if you are truly on a path to being promoted or if management is feeding you fluff.  

     

    In these days of industry consolidation, you need to be looking busy.  If all you’re doing is getting lunch for people, your headcount will be the first on the chopping block.  

    Post # 11
    Member
    32 posts
    Newbee

    harmonicsoul :  Why are you volunteering to do secretarial tasks? I’m sure you could keep yourself busy, even with so much downtime. Make sure you look busy.

    I would stay at least another year, since I’ve heard you shouldn’t leave your first job before 2 years if you can avoid it.

    Post # 14
    Member
    840 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: June 2013

    harmonicsoul :  I would wait to see what happens at your review then. If youre not satisfied start looking. Dont ever bail before 1 year unless you are in a truly awful, abusive situation.

    Post # 15
    Member
    1547 posts
    Bumble bee

    harmonicsoul :  I was in such a similar position, first job after my degree, in a government agency. I also had barely any meaningful work, but was told I would take over my managers position as he was keen to retire. Well I felt I wasn’t learning anything and not contributing anything worthwhile.bi felt uninspired and miserable, like all my years of study were being wasted. At the same time I felt so ungrateful because so many others grads couldn’t find jobs, let alone at my pay level. Anyway I still decided to quit, found a new job in a private company, took a HUGE pay cut, worked much harder and longer hours, but it is mentally much better. I am being challenged everyday and constantly learning and developing new skills. I have no regrets. Within a year I got a promotion and pay rise. The manager at my old workplace was made redundant …. So I say go with your gut and don’t settle. 

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