(Closed) Born in the USA… And what happens next

posted 6 years ago in Pregnancy
Post # 76
Member
2814 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

ChantelleC90:  It really had nothing to do with loopholes or my doctors knowing anything. I got put off work and handed a sick note from my doctor. As per the maternity leave policies on the Government of Canada website, I applied for my sickness benefits:

For biological mothers, however, the maximum number of weeks payable could increase to 102 weeks when <abbr title=”Employment Insurance”>EI</abbr> maternity and parental benefits are combined with <abbr title=”Employment Insurance”>EI</abbr> sickness, compassionate care and PCIC benefits. Please note that proof of entitlement is required for each type of benefit.

This means that mothers who have given birth and have not received <abbr title=”Employment Insurance”>EI</abbr> regular benefits during their current benefit period could potentially receive <abbr title=”Employment Insurance”>EI</abbr> sickness benefits for up to 15 weeks, <abbr title=”Employment Insurance”>EI</abbr> maternity benefits for up to 15 weeks, <abbr title=”Employment Insurance”>EI</abbr> parental benefits for up to 35 weeks, EI compassionate care benefits for up to 6 weeks and EI PCIC benefits for up to 35 weeks, as long as they meet the entitlement conditions for each type of benefit requested. If they do receive <abbr title=”Employment Insurance”>EI</abbr> regular benefits during the benefit period, then they can only receive 50 weeks of benefits during the 52-week period.”

Post # 77
Member
2598 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

urchin:  So the only way to care for one another is by forced government subsidies to people for their personal life choices?  

Look, I’m sure its nice to be handed something for nothing and get paid to breed but at the end of the day, its still not anyone else’s responsibility to finance your decision to procreate.  

Post # 78
Member
2814 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

Zhabeego:  You obviously feel really passionate about this (or angry, perhaps).

Our country seems to be happy with the system, as do many others. I’m happy to disagree with your beliefs on how the world should work.

Post # 79
Member
2183 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: November 2011 - Florida Aquarium

My three months of American leave ended March 6. I came back to work and resigned that day. My boss and had made an agreement prior to my leave that included work flexibility, but she rescinded it. I have a baby, now, and working must fit my family. Speaking from experience, three months is not long enough, and I cried at six weeks thinking of all of the moms who had to go back then (i was still hormonal :)). 

The workforce is slowly (slowly) adapting to a more flexible plan. If my boss had let me work from home, with childcare, I wouldn’t have resigned because I would have been able to go to my daughter’s daycare 3 times a day and nurse her– rather than pumping in my office. 

The US is very slow to adopt new ideas. This is sad. And this fails our families. Working, I was literally getting home in time to nurse her to sleep. That was my time with her– nursing in the morning, nursing at night and bedtime. It felt like being less than a part-time mom to me, and I was miserable.  

Post # 80
Member
923 posts
Busy bee

urchin:  I would just ignore her. Like I said earlier she has nothing other than some personal vendetta backing up her opinions. Some people are just nasty and negative. 

Post # 81
Member
923 posts
Busy bee

also not everyone in america is even entitled to 3 months leave, paid or unpaid. I work for a company that is small enough that they aren’t required to hold me job at all. If the company you work for has less than 50  employees they aren’t required to give you any leave at all, same with if you have worked there for less than 12 months. 

Post # 82
Member
2814 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

 

Moonbear17:  lol… just the tone of responses seems so angry. I’m happy with what we have here..so that’s all that really matters to me. I understand her POV to an extent, but she seems to have an awful time grasping mine 😐

Post # 83
Member
2598 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

Moonbear17:  LOL.  Yes, I have a personal vendetta against people picking my pocket to fund their personal life choices.  How selfish of me.  

I also hate stork parking.  Nonsense.

Post # 84
Member
923 posts
Busy bee

how is anyone picking your pockets? I pay taxes for a reason, and I expect to be able to use some of the benefits of them when I need them. I don’t expect to get to stay home for 5 years on my full salary, but a few months would be nice considering that I do pay a ton of  taxes and I work hard. I don’t think that makes me a begger or a drain on society. 

Post # 85
Member
1348 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

Just so it’s clear:

In the USA, according to the Family and Medical Leave Act, you can take up to 12 weeks of unpaid job-protected leave. You must work for a company that has 50 or more employees and you cannot be in the 10 percent compensation bracket. You also must work 25 hours per-week at that job.  Paid maternity leave is sometimes offered by companies and usually lasts 6 weeks.  So knowing what the policy is at your company, and how many people your company employs is really important. 

Zhabeego:  “Oh, and by the way, what about all those people who don’t have kids?  They just get to pay for others to take their baby vacations year after year?  They get to take up all the slack at work AND finance it.  Yeah, that’s fair.”

What are you talking about people paying for others taking “baby vacations”? I was under the impression that the company pays for the maternity leave, not the government. So unless you are talking about individuals picking up slack while someone is away, I’m very confused. Usually, companies hire temps to work that position as well. In order to take maternity leave, you also must put in your notice at least 30 days in advance which is more than enough time for a company to make accomodations. Unless you live in California, New Jersey, or Washington, there is no government required-by-law paid parental leave. So, you shouldn’t be paying for it out of your tax dollars. If your specific company is over loading you with work because someone took parental leave, that is on your company, not the government or the practice itself. 

Having a child, or adopting one (since that hasn’t been brought up) is a huge adjustment for families. Some women bounce right back, others take a bit more time. Some women want to solely breast feed (no pumping) and others are fine with formula/pumping. Some moms are totally okay with their infant being in daycare, while other moms aren’t. Regardless, there is an adjustment period. That’s okay. After the 12 weeks is up, if they need more time, they should absolutely save up for it. There, I agree with you. But your rampage otherwise has my head spinning. 

Viewing the addition of a child to a family as a “baby vacation” leaves a nasty taste in my mouth. What are women to do? Never have children? It’s not about special consideration, entitlement, or wanting “more more more”. It’s about needing time to adjust. 3 months without pay for many is impossible. Are families that reside in the higher tax brackets the only ones that are supposed to have families? What about an accidental pregnancy? Should all of those families abort because they cannot afford to take time off of work to have a baby? Having a child isn’t necessarily always a “vacation” or a cool/hip lifestyle choice.

So the waitress that gets pregnant and loses her job because her company has under 50 employees and she works part-time, that’s okay? 

Maybe when affordable child care is easier to access and school systems work on the same schedule as normal jobs, we can talk a little bit more. But it seems to me that your elitist way of thinking is entirely selfish and inane. You do realize that you pay for social security, wic, disability,etc. ? Should people begin saving in case they were to become disabled? Isn’t it a choice to retire? One could argue. 

As far as stork parking goes, I’m not sure if you’ve ever been pregnant, but it’s an awesome feeling to get a good parking spot when you’re swollen and uncomfortable and your child is jumping on your bladder and feels like they are going to fall out of you. Plus, the only stork parking I’ve ever seen has been at a babies-r-us. Do you frequent there often? I guess the “families with children” parking really inconviences you as well? Maybe the handicap parking? 

I implore you to gain some compassion for those that aren’t all cookie-cutter upper class families. If your personal paycheck is being affected by parental leave, I would suggest switching companies. 

By the way, other countries who do actually pay for maternity leave (and SHOCKER have paid paternity leave) pay WAY more than our “exorbitant” taxes. 

  • This reply was modified 5 years, 7 months ago by  lolita39.
Post # 86
Member
2814 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

Zhabeego:  … AND you hate pregnancy parking?

Seriously?

With my medical problems, those parking spots enabled me to get out and buy food or shop for necessities.. When my child was an infant, it enabled me to get to the grocery store quickly without exposing my child to the cold. I seriously have no clue why you detest anything to do with helping mothers. It’s quite disturbing how angry you are.

Hateful.

I’m not picking your pockets…nor would I be if you lived in Canada. I pay a lot in taxes over my working career, and take out substantially less that I will personally, on my own, pay in throughout my working career.

Post # 87
Member
3356 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

Keep in mind that maternity leave policies in the US are generally specific to companies. Yeah there’s no mandated law or whatever, but my employer’s maternity benefits (not that it applies to me at all) are pretty dang competitive. Also, with all this complaining about maternity policies and such in the US, don’t forget that European countries have up to 50% income tax. Would you like that too? Zhabeego:  Agreed. Being pregnant is not a disability.

Post # 88
Member
3823 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

Zhabeego:  lol Listen, I pay taxes, my husband and I make almost $200k combined. I think we deserve a little more than a measly 6 weeks off (that’s what my company provides). I know what you’re doing. You’re picturing someone who made poor life choices “mooching” off of you. I highly doubt that I’m mooching off of you by asking the US Government that I vote for to amend the rights of mothers in the US. Highly doubt it.

Post # 89
Member
1348 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

strawbs:  I believe you are thinking of the maximum tax possible, not the maximum payroll tax. The United States is also very high. 

Also, their taxes go towards things such as universal healthcare, subsidized daycare, & free universities. It doesn’t soley go towards parental leave. They also typically tax people in higher brackets more. Which isn’t a always a common practice in the USA. 

Pregnancy as a disability is another topic. A normal healthy pregnancy is not considered to be a disability under the ADA and therefore employers do not have to provide accomodations that they would not provide for other similarly situated workers. When a woman is diagnosed with gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, sciatica, carpal tunnel, etc. that is when it becomes tricky and pregnancy is then a disability. Therefore, accomodations MUST be made by law under the ADAAA. 

End of the day, I would MUCH rather have a government that supports families and the growth of the community, than working until death and dying in debt. 

Post # 90
Member
2598 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

urchin:  You can keep calling me angry, it doesn’t make it true.  I’m not angry.  I just don’t think people are entitled to be paid for personal life choices or get preferential parking for those same life choices.  

If you had medical issues, you likely qualified for a handicapped parking spot.  If your medical issues didn’t qualify, then they weren’t that severe.  

Parking is first come, first served.  That’s fair.  If you want a close spot, find one or wait for one.  Lots of people have painful medical issues – pregnancy isn’t more worthy of special parking than any of those.  

I totally use the stork parking.  Keeping your kid warm and safe is your job.  Stork parking is just another example of the ridiculous entitlement of modern day parents.  I didn’t become a second class citizen because someone else got knocked up.  

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