(Closed) Bra size and Breast milk supply

posted 6 years ago in Babies
Post # 3
Member
2142 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

@bells:

I have wondered the exact same thing.

Pre-pregnancy I was barely A and now am a A.  You would think if the storage was smaller that would equate less supply right?

Say it ain’t so!

Post # 5
Member
6009 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: May 2009

I only breastfed for a few weeks, but for me, milk came in really fast and I had a very abundant supply!  Even after I quit breastfeeding, and I let my milk dry up, I still leaked for a few months afterward.  It was like I couldn’t turn it off even when I wanted to!

For reference, I am normally barely a B cup; I went up to D after my daughter was born, and then back down to an A after my milk finally dried up for good.

Post # 6
Member
65 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: March 2013

No. 🙂 You’ll make as much as your baby needs, regardless of how big/small your boobs are! It’s all about supply and demand.

Post # 9
Member
5296 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: January 1993

I don’t think so – it’s more about the number of milk-producing alveoli that you have inside. Bigger boobs could just contain more fatty tissue, not necessarily milk-producing tissue.

And if you need to increase production – feed/pump more often. Prolactin, which is the hormone that tells the body to make more milk, works off of demand. So the more you demand it, the more it will make – to a point.

 

*disclaimer: I don’t have kids and am not a lactation specialist, but did grow up on a dairy farm and took lactation as a class in college. Yes, it really is its own class.

Post # 10
Member
145 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

Definitely not…prior to pregnancy I was barely a B cup and now I’m a D/DD and supplying plenty of milk for my daughter.  Whereas my sister was a Dirty Delete (or larger) prior to pregnancy wasn’t able to breastfeed because she didn’t produce enough.

Post # 11
Member
3587 posts
Sugar bee

Nope. I’m a 38D and I breastfed for a while before my supply died off.

Post # 12
Member
2562 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: July 2010

I am going to chime in as well, and say that I am an NICU nurse, working on my LC certification, and there is no corrolation between breast size and milk supply whatsoever.

The only issue would be if you were very small breasted, due to lack of gladular tissue in your breast(s), which is quite rare. That being said, I have seen a large breasted woman with no glandolar tissue in one of her breasts whatsoever. She still nursed twins with the breast that did have glandular tissue, she just looked really lopsided when the milk came in.

Post # 13
Member
63 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

For what it’s worth, I had size A breasts pre-pregnancy and had/have serious problems with low milk supply. For me, the supply-demand thing doodlebug and others mentioned is simply not true — I’ll never make enough. 

Post # 14
Member
2142 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

@Ms Mini:

How do you know if you have lack of glandular tissue in your breasts? Because honestly I really do have really small breasts.

@Zippy:

🙁 I’m sorry. That is what I’m afraid of. Are you still breastfeeding? Do you supplement with formula?

Post # 15
Member
720 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2009

Ah, just tried to comment and there was an error.  Hopefully I won’t double post.  Anyway, I am not even an A cup when not pregnant/breastfeeding.  I breastfed for 5.5 months.  I supplemented for that last feeding of the night (when supply is usually lowest) because it was frustrating for everyone.  I did, however, have a hard time pumping.  The nipple shields were all too big.  I eventually used a hand pump that worked way better.

Post # 16
Member
720 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2009

Oh, and my boobs never got huge.  I was probably a legitimate full A.  And you ladies with large breasts?  I no longer envy you.  Well, maybe a little. 🙂

The topic ‘Bra size and Breast milk supply’ is closed to new replies.

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