(Closed) Breast feeding is hard!

posted 8 years ago in Babies
Post # 3
Member
2867 posts
Sugar bee

Wow, thanks for the advice.  I’ll keep this info in the back of mind for when I have children.  I read an article once where a lady went through so much pain breastfeeding her first child that she gave up a month into it after using lanolin and other stuff, all the LLLI people and lactation consultants were like “it shouldn’t hurt!”  Well on her second child she decided to just let her nipples scab over and continue breastfeeding, she said it hurt sooo badly for awhile but eventually she got used to it and she got acclimated.  She made a point to say that it does hurt but it’s worth it.

Post # 4
Member
46451 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

This is one of the few times in your life when you and your baby will be learning a new skill at the same time.

It is not at all like they show in the movies where the woman puts the newly delivered baby to breast and all goes well. Give yourself permission and time to be a learner. Do nothing in the first few weeks other than breastfeed and otherwise care for your baby, take care of oyur personal needs, eat (preferably food prepared by someone else) and sleep! If the baby is sleeping you should be sleeping too. You will never again be so tired in your life as during the first two months of first time new motherhood.

La Leche International is a support organization for breastfeeding mothers. They have great resource books available and lots of information on their website

http://www.lll.org

 

 

Post # 5
Member
2821 posts
Sugar bee

Thanks for sharing, always good to know what to expect even when I’m not expecting yet. 

Glad you guys found a good solution that will work best for both of you.  She’s still getting lots of your nutrients and immunity even if your milk is in a bottle sometimes.  Honestly, even mothers who only give their babies breastmilk I haven’t known one that hasn’t pumped and put it in a bottle sometimes and I’ve never heard of any confusion in any of their babies. 

Does milk typically come in after labor and trying to feed or do some women start before giving birth?

Post # 7
Member
311 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2008

Sorry you’re having such a hard time, but thanks for sharing your story.  If you continue to have trouble, I know one of my friends was really helped by La Leche League staff.  Also, I’m not sure what hospital you work at, but do they have a NICU?  Are there any OT/SLP staff there that do feeding?  If you know one of them, they can be a great resource too.

Post # 8
Member
2058 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

Hi Mrs DG – – are you part of a Seattle PEPS group (Program for Early Parent Support?)  One of my very dear friends who is 34 has two little girls.  She doesn’t work on Wed’s because she has been part of her PEPS group for 2.5 yrs and she doesn’t want to stop meeting.  She began when her oldest was 3 weeks…Not sure if you’re interested but thought I would throw it out there Laughing

Post # 9
Member
8353 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: March 2011

When I nursed my babies, it helped to lay on the bed on my side and have baby lay next to me. You want to make sure your baby isn’t hurting you. If your baby gets a bad hold on you, put your finger next to the corner of the babies mouth and pop him/her off of you. And then try again. Take a break if you need to. It should not hurt. It can be a very rewarding experience, if done correctly. Nowadays, there may even be a utube video on how to do it. I nursed 3 babies and didn’t have to use any cream because I was lucky enough to have a nurse that taught me the right way. Good luck to you.

Post # 10
Member
7052 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2010

I had my son prematurely and my body wasn’t yet ready to fully be able to nurse yet, so I worked w/a lactation consultant and she was great.  Spent a good deal of time with me and I basically pumped while my son was in the nicu.  My body finally decided it was ready to go, and after a month, around when my son was discharged, it went smoothly.  However, I knew it was an uphill battle (as per the consultant) because I had him early and was only able to nurse for 3 months, but it really did help him grow imho.

It does get sore for a while.  I really think getting a hospital grade pump to help things along is good too. 

Post # 11
Member
7052 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2010

Oh I forgot..the one thing I loved?  Don’t laugh.  I was told by the consultant to get bags of frozen english peas.  Take em’ out of the freezer and sqoosh them in the bag and put them on your breasts if they are hurting really bad or get inflammed. 

Know it sounds silly, but it really did work.

Post # 12
Member
403 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

I used to work in maternity, and I always told my patients that the biggest misconception about breastfeeding is that it’s natural so it must be easy! I also always told them that 9 times out of 10 there was some sort of issue with breastfeeding, so it’s absolutely common, if not the norm!

I know what that nurse was getting at by not being “forceful” enough. A very common mistake is not getting the baby latched on at the split second that their mouths are open wide enough. The second very common mistake is not waiting until their mouths are open wide enough. You’ll know she’s open wide enough when her mouth is open as much as it is when she yawns. She’ll probably make several semi-attempts before she gives you the big one. 😉 You have to sort of teach her that she’ll only get to nurse if she opens that wide, and she’ll eventually catch on.

It’s normal to hurt (as in the “yowza!” factor) for the first several seconds, but it should definitely get better after that. If it doesn’t, insert your finger into the corner of her mouth to break the suction (allow her to suck on your finger instead of your nipple if you need to), then pull her away and start over. If it still really hurts after those first few seconds, it’s usually because she hasn’t opened her mouth wide enough so she’s sucking more on your nipple than your areola, which is where she should be.

I hope that helps (someone, at least!), and I really hope things continue to go well for you both!

Post # 13
Member
403 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

PS: Mrs. DG, are you cup feeding her with the formula, or using a bottle? If she’s latching and sucking well, the bottle is fine. Nipple “confusion” really seems to be more like nipple “laziness”–babies who are frustrated with nursing obviously choose the easier, more instant gratification of the bottle. If this isn’t an issue and she’s continuing to nurse well, great! If not, cup feeding may be an option. You just fill a little med cup with the formula, pinch it a little bit to make a little spout out of it, and just rest it on her bottom lip. Tip it up so the formula touches her upper lip and she’ll start to drink! All babies can do it, but only for the first couple of weeks.

Post # 14
Member
2195 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: January 2013

I’m sorry it’s been so hard–I have been hearing many mommies moan lately about how hard breastfeeding is!  I would have never suspected it until this.  I hate the idea of leaky nipples too, but apparently that’s unavoidable? :/  Thanks for sharing your story, I have really been appreciating all these mommy info-packed posts lately.

Side note, I would have freaked if a nurse grabbed my breast without my permission.  It may be used to feed a baby atm, but it’s still my boob!

Hope it gets easier for you!

Post # 15
Member
2695 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: February 2008

Mrs. DG – thanks so much for sharing, but sorry this has been such an ordeal! I met  a woman the other day who told me the best thing she ever did was get a lactation consultant who could visit after she came home from the hospital – and give it to my husband.  I think I am going to get that number handy!

Thanks everyone for sharing your suggestions, esp. Hope. I have several friends who gave up on breastfeeding and pumped exclusively because it was too hard and I really want to breastfeed, so the more knowledge the better!

Post # 16
Member
403 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

@Janna: no problem! My sister gave up on breastfeeding after a week, and it was because she was so desperate to get him to nurse that she sort of took what she could get. I mean, she got him to latch on, but because she didn’t wait until his mouth was wide enough or she didn’t get him on quickly enough when he DID open his mouth wide, he only got her nipple. As a result, it hurt her and he didn’t get the amount of colostrum/milk he otherwise would have (it’s the suction on the areola that triggers milk release–the nipple is only the conduit). He became jaundiced so she ended p switching to the bottle. I had tried to explain these things to her, but she was understandably frustrated and emotionally vulnerable so she wasn’t really able to process it and understand the connection.

On the plus side, most women who want to nurse are able to. It’s just that sometimes it’s a lot of work! The times that I’ve seen nursing be unsuccessful despite doing everything right are usually when the baby just doesn’t get the hang of it. Even then, though, there are often things you can do to help (but I’ll leave that to the lactation consultants–that’s beyond me!).

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