(Closed) Breast reduction and breast feeding

posted 6 years ago in Babies
Post # 17
Member
1088 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2014

My older sister had surgery at 17. She had her kids at 29 and 34, and was unable to breast feed either, but I don’t know more details 🙁

Post # 18
Member
336 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2009

@SouthernPearl:  I had ONE morning where I woke up and had one little drop of colostrum on my tank top from the previous night.  I was so excited because it meant there was actually something in there!  But that was all… so while it was reassuring it didn’t really help convince me. 

FWIW, I don’t really think the surgeons know.  And they hedge their bets so you don’t come back and sue them.  I called my surgeon when I was pregnant to find out the technique he used.  He used the inferior pedicle approach, which gives the best chances for breastfeeding.  You can call your surgeon and ask because it’s hard to tell from the scars.  

Also, I think another factor is how much feeling you have in the nipple.  That’s really important for let down.  It had been so long since my surgery I think I have just about full feeling so I really think that helped a lot as well.

Post # 19
Member
53 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: October 2014

Hey guys, NICU nurse here! I have done  a lot of lactation work and also helped a friend out with her breastfeeding issues after her breast reduction. Milk supply will all depend on what type of surgery you had and how long it’s been since the surgery. The most common type of reduction involves a lift and, according to the lactation consultant I’ve studied under, results in a poor milk supply. The basis of it is that the breasts might make milk but the nerves to cause a let-down are severed during the surgery and don’t function as well, if at all, when trying to breastfeed – kind of like someone who breaks their neck and becomes paralyzed. Whatever milk glands are left after the surgery will make milk but often the issues with let-down will cause difficulty in maintaining proper supply. There are still lots of options though! THe most important step is breastfeeding in the first few days of life to get baby all the colostrum – this will be in your breasts regardless of leakage or type of reduction and it is SO beneficial to the baby! Your lactation consultant will also most likely (again, depending on the type of reduction) have you pump after nursing for extra stimulation. Only time will tell if you will produce enough to maintain your baby’s wait but please remember that ANY amount of breastmilk is good for your baby! Even if you only produce an ounce or two each day, you can still use breastfeeding as a bonding time and then supplement with formula if you have to. Make sure that your OB, Pediatrician, and of course lactation consultant at your hospital are all aware of your reduction because they will likely keep a closer eye out for feeding-related baby issues like jaundice, weight loss, etc. Good luck, hope everything works out for you mommas!

Post # 20
Member
49 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: February 2012

@mtler:  I had breast reduction surgery in 2010 and a baby boy last August. They detached the areola for the surgery.

I breastfed him for one month and then switched to exclusive pumping since I had to go back to work. I have not had any issues with supply. He is starting solids right now, so he eats around 24 oz of milk and I’m producing 35-40 oz a day! I’m freezing the leftover milk. Also, I pumped nonstop in the beginning to mantain supply.

Eventhough I produce a lot of milk, my right boob produces 2-3 oz less than the left one and I’ve noticed some milk coming out from my areola. When I breastfed my baby, he HATED the right boob, so I guess something must have been messed up.

I hope you have a positive experience!

 

 

Post # 21
Member
312 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: April 2013

commenting to follow;  I have always wondered about this, I had my reduction 7 years ago and will start TTC within the next few months.

Post # 22
Member
167 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

@MsJ2theZ:  Thank you! I think I maybe knew that but you confirming it is reassuring

Post # 23
Member
1285 posts
Bumble bee

I had one, but after I was finished having children. My surgeon reccommended it after having kids, but said if I change my mind and decided to have more children and wanted to breast feed, that I shouldn’t have any problems at all with breast feeding.

 

Post # 24
Member
167 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

@NurseNess17:  Thank you! Good information. Question.. will the colostrum automatically come out or does it come out by the baby sucking or pumping. I had given up all hopes on Boyfriend or Best Friend due to my surgery so this is something I need to gather all the info I can on now. I dont really wanna go through the the latching on stuff Ive always wanted to pump instead. Should I have a pump ready in the hospital?

Post # 25
Member
1285 posts
Bumble bee

@SouthernPearl:  No, they don’t remove your nipple completely, They cut around, make the areola smaller and move the nipple up, without removing the nipple from the inner tissues. 

 

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