Breeder v. Rescue

posted 2 years ago in Pets
Post # 31
Member
1143 posts
Bumble bee

Lavender28 :  that’s a good point. Forced breeding. Slavery. Ew. 

Post # 32
Member
1361 posts
Bumble bee

I’m a shelter dog only person.  I have one purebred that I got from a rescue and one you might call a designer dog that I got from a shelter.  I personally can and will only get a shelter/rescue animal.  

I do judge people that get dogs from pet stores and backyard breeders.  I judge people that advertise a litter of pups free to a good home.  

As I understand it there are responsible legitimate breeders that are truly invested in the breed, that love the breed, that are picky about accepting customers.  They are highly recognized within the industry and really seek to advance the breed in terms of the best health, temperament, etc. it’s a dedicated passion.  I have no problem with breeders like this and I would not judge someone for getting a dog from a breeder like this.  

Post # 33
Member
1631 posts
Bumble bee

I get pretty frustrated when people buy from dog stores or obvious Lancaster puppy mills, but rescues don’t make sense for everyone. 

Post # 34
Member
2922 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: March 1996

bewitched :  To be honest, it’s probably because they volunteer at high-kill shelters and see sooo many dogs being put to sleep.

I think it’s kind of you to assume this, but in reality those of us who volunteer at open-admission shelters know better than anyone how many purebred dogs come through the doors. If I asked a stranger on the street if their dog was a purebred and they said yes, my brain wouldn’t immediately go to “backyard breeder!!!” because I’ve seen all the beautiful purebreds surrendered and then adopted through our shelter.

Post # 35
Member
347 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2018

As someone that previously worked in a shelter, I have a few thoughts on this. If allergies are involved, sure, do your research and get a dog from a breeder. But what drives me NUTS is when people go to puppy stores. I had a coworker that was literally SHOCKED when I told her there were other ways to get a dog than at a puppy store.

I know this post isn’t about puppy stores, but just an aside – I will also say that we had plenty of very, VERY sick puppies brought to the shelter by people who had purchased them from puppy stores (I remember multiple people who had purchased the puppy the DAY before) and were unable to pay for their medical costs since they had just spent so much on the puppy. They would end up relinquishing them to us, where we provided extensive medical care, and then adopted them out.

As for breeders – in my experience, many purebred puppies end up in shelters from people who previously purchased them from breeders and were unable to handle the puppy. These were typically high energy and/or large dogs – in the time I worked there I saw multiple Labs, Golden Retrievers, ALL OF THE GOLDENDOODLES AND LABRADOODLES, Huskies, Akitas, Great Danes, etc. These dogs were bred to have a job, and they became destructive, bored little puppies without the exercise and mental stimulation that they needed. 

All this is to say – do your research, and know that there are many purebreds to be had in shelters.

Post # 36
Member
1762 posts
Buzzing bee

nerk :  Exactly what do they think happens to the puppies who don’t get adopted at a rescue? This pisses me off, puppies are more manageable for many people to train, so what the hell is wrong with getting a puppy? 

Post # 37
Member
542 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2026

I have a rescue dog and he certainly came with a lot of baggage. He’s my first dog ever, so he’s definitely quite an experience. As other posters have said though, not all rescue dogs are going to come with issues, and a good breeder puppy can potentially have behavior problems too if not properly socialized and taken care of. The lady was angry because there are so many perfectly good family dogs that are euthanized each year. She didn’t have to be rude about it, but there are a lot of dogs that are worth saving that sadly never get that chance. That said, I am not against purchasing a dog from an accredited breeder. I really want a white german shepherd and am considering getting a second dog once we get a house. There are some white shepherds at rescues, but I wonder if getting a puppy would be different from getting an adult dog who already had a traumatizing past. My current pup must have been in the shelter for a year or so, and like yours, needs structure. 

Post # 38
Member
113 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: May 2018

Adopting from a shelter is great. But I’m more concerned about what people do with their dog once they have it instead of where they got it from. Too many people leave their dogs outside all the time or never take it on walks. A family on my block owns a golden doodle. When they let it out, they attach it to a very short lead in their backyard. The dog can barely go out in the backyard with that lead. They have a fence but it’s a small one. I have never once seen them walk that dog in the almost year we have lived here. I feel so bad for that dog, he has so much obvious pent up energy. People need to take care of their dogs, no matter where they came from. The dog didn’t ask to be created, he/she deserves a good life no matter where it came from.

Both of my huskies are pure bred rescues. They have issues, and I’m glad we were able to take them into our home. The female was heavily abused and was very underweight when we got her. She had food aggression issues. Working with her we were able to correct that. She still is a little weary of strangers, especially large men with beards, but she is fine as long as no one grabs her by the collar. That triggers her and she freaks out a bit. She’s not perfect, but she has come so far. Our male is a tripod. He is missing a rear leg. He wasn’t walking well when we got him, his leg removal surgery had happened a couple months before we rescued him. An MRI/x-rays later, he’s physically fine. They think it’s just he has a lot of muscle memory in that leg, plus the rescue didn’t remove quite enough of the leg so he still tries to use it. He’s in physical therapy and he has become so much stronger!

My point is, I rescue. But I don’t judge those who don’t. I will judge you on how you treat your dog though. That is really all that matters.

Post # 39
Hostess
9632 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: March 2014 - Chicago, IL

Over the course of our relationship we’ve bought four purebred French bulldogs from breeders and one purebred Ragdoll. Our animals are our life. I would never own a breed other than a bulldog, for personal reasons. Even though we’ve spent a small fortune on our animals we still donate time and money to local shelters. We do our best, I guess. I would like to get a Frenchie from a rescue one day.

Post # 41
Member
1328 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2005 - A Castle

It was by total chance that I got my dog, and while he’s a purebred, I feel I rescued him from his situation. I never knew backyard breeders were a thing, but he definitely came from one. He was malnourished, could see his ribs, and was sleeping in a carrier he probably outgrew a month before I got him. He’s now almost 10 and he’s been a wonderful dog his whole life. 

I know people get heated about this, but like a lot of other things in life, I find it to be a “you do you” kind of thing. 

Post # 42
Member
1762 posts
Buzzing bee

wildflowerz :  Why judge people who are giving away accidental puppies free to a good home? What should they do with the puppies? Sell them for a profit? Take them to a rescue? What are they supposed to do when their dog accidentally gets pregnant? Abort the puppies? 

 

Post # 43
Hostess
9632 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: March 2014 - Chicago, IL

DaniGirl03 :  I think *maybe* because when you give them for free animal abusers and people that fight dogs have an opportunity to get puppies and use them for not so great reasons. Plus, those people aren’t helping to control the pet population by just letting their animals randomly breed. (I have cousins in the Southern US that don’t fix their animals and are, seemingly, always giving away free puppies. It seems ridiculously irresponsible to me). 

Post # 44
Member
1507 posts
Bumble bee

There is a difference between a backyard breeder and a responsible breeder.

I fall into the responsible category – I DNA test my cats to ensure that there are zero signs of genetic disease; I ensure that the cats I breed are champions in both CFA and TICA (I don’t show overseas so I don’t show in FIFe).  I also don’t breed more than once a year and keep the kittens with mom until they’re at least 16 weeks old and know how to be a cat.  They’re also raised as fearless members of the family.  Pets are spayed or neutered and microchipped, in addition to shots, before they leave my house.  And, those that go to breeders only go to breeders that are known and respected in the NFC community.

I also work with breed rescue and overall rescues.  

No one should shame you because of your choices.  Backyard breeders are the problem, not the responsible ones and the responsible pet owners

Post # 45
Member
1762 posts
Buzzing bee

mrstaylorlevy :  I have a golden retriever and I knew what I was getting in to for activity levels and that she would be puppy like well into her adult years. She didn’t calm down until she was 5, she’s also the derpiest, most loving and caring and attention needing dog ever. Who of course we love to death. Somedays the dog ran out of energy first, some days the kidlet ran out of energy first.

I think my biggest pet peeve with pet owners of rescues or breeders or pet stores pups is when they don’t research and prepare for what they’re getting in to. It’s not hard to prepare what you need at home for a puppy, it’s not hard to find training instructions for different methods online, it’s not hard to research different breeds and get a huge amount of information of what to expect. 

When we got our dog, I was already prepared at home, I had already been getting everything we needed, I had already researched what breeds I felt I had the skills to train and what I thought would be a good fit for our household. I’d been actively looking for a dog. I also took several days off so we could start training and bond with puppy before bringing her into our routine and lifestyle. So I guess what makes me pissed off is bad owners.

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