Breeder v. Rescue

posted 2 years ago in Pets
Post # 61
Member
381 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2016

I volunteer at a local rescue and it’s really, really hard for me to see dogs be put down because nobody adopts them, while some people looking for dogs only go to breeders. It’s difficult for me NOT to judge people who buy from breeders. I really try to be open minded about it but it’s something I can’t seem to get over. That being said, I’d never be rude to someone for buying from a breeder. I just don’t agree with it. It’s not my place to push my morals onto someone else. I do like to educate people about rescues, though! I think that can be done tastefully and politely.

Post # 64
Member
2128 posts
Buzzing bee

I have leonbergers, so I used a Breeder. She is amazing, she health tests for absolutely everything she can, is very strict on keeping lines apart, produces beautiful dogs that outlive the breed standard, and will always take back the dog if the owner’s circumstances change or she doesn’t like how the dog is being kept. 

I would LOVE to adopt a shelter dog. Every part of me wants to, except the really big part of me that is terrified of most dogs. I just can’t be comfortable around new dogs. I think they are gorgeous creatures, but I get so damn nervous. I wish this wasn’t the case, but it is. My life with my leonbergers is forcing me to interact with more dogs I don’t know, so I am slowly overcoming this, and I hope that one day I am brave enough to adopt a shelter dog of my own. 

Cats on the other hand… I will only ever adopt. My family has always adopted/rescued cats. We had a purebred Persian at one stage because the owner was using her to pump out kittens and didn’t want her once her kitten days were over. My mum was waiting to pick up another pet from the vets and this lady came in saying “I want my cat put down, I have no use for her” so my mum was like “I’ll take her!” 🙋‍♀️ I have no need for a specific cat, so rescue cats suit us just fine. 

I also think that all pet shops should be banned from selling animals UNLESS they are from shelters. It boggles my mind that you can walk into a pet store and just buy a dog with no prior planning, and no knowledge of where that dog came from. Animals should never be an impulse buy. 

Post # 66
Member
1842 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2016

ChasingZenith :  I think it’s fantastic that you were able to find hypoallergenic rescues. Really. But no, if those who are allergic to dogs can’t find a hypoallergenic rescue, I don’t think they’re entitled to dog ownership. There are other pets out there, which hopefully they aren’t allergic to, but if not, then that’s how the cookie crumbles. I didn’t create allergies, and neither did the dogs who are dying in shelters. 

You can call it presumptous, that’s fine. But it’s how I feel. The philosophy that underlies my beliefs is that dogs (or any animal for that matter) do not exist for humans’ pleasure and wants and desires. Many people do not agree with that opinion, but it is still my opinion. 

Post # 67
Member
7039 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2012

Honestly I think the super judgy people hurt their case more than help it. Most people are not interested in listening to those who make them feel bad about their decisions or try to shame them in any way.

We have two Labs, one rescue and one pure bred English Lab.

 Both Darling Husband and I grew up with labs and just feel they are the best fit for our lifestyle and future family. We’re huge animal lovers, and while I generally love all dogs we just knew labs were right for us.

We got our English Lab as a puppy, after extensive research on breeders. We knew we wanted an English Lab for their temperment. A lot of times American labs tend to be very hyper but English Labs are much more mellow. She has been the best dog ever, and is currently 13 years old. We went that route specifically because we live on the coast and spend a lot of time on the water and boating. We could never have a breed that doesn’t like to swim or go in the water.

When we got our second lab we had no intentions of getting another dog. She fell into our lap, along with her son (she’s had 3 litters). We kept her, and our good friends adopted her son.  As a rescue came with some bad habits that were hard to break, and some we still haven’t been able to break even after 3 years. When she came to us she was very much a growler, protective over her food, and we felt like we needed to watch her around people (we have NEVER felt any unease with our older lab at all, around anyone including babies and children she has always been a 100% gental giant her whole life).  We love her and she’s the sweetest dog who just wants to be on you at all times.

We would not change having our second dog because she’s a huge part of our family, but I know that we will continue to get any future dogs from the breeder we used before.

Post # 69
Member
1336 posts
Bumble bee

Lavender28 :  I’m also an adopt don’t shop person.  But in regard to you believing that animals do not exist for the pleasure, wants & desires of humans – haven’t a few dog breeds been intentionally bred over many many years specifically to be companion animals?  

Post # 70
Member
2986 posts
Sugar bee

Saying people don’t deserve dogs unless they rescue is the same as saying people shouldn’t have kids unless they adopt. 

Dogs in shelters, like kids in foster homes or orphanages, are there because OTHER PEOPLE are either irresponsible, or can’t/don’t want to take care of them. That doesn’t mean that everyone else has to be the ones to do it. 

This is where freedom of choice and free will come in. If people feel they can only get a quality dog, for whatever criteria or reason they deem fit, from a breeder, far be it from anyone else to start passing judgment. 

Should people only be allowed to have kids once every single kid worldwide is adopted? Likewise, should people only be able to buy a dog from a breeder after every shelter is empty? 

There’s a time and a place to adopt a dog from a shelter, and there’s a time and a place to get a dog from a breeder. Neither one is worse than the other. 

Disclaimer: Except puppy mills – there’s a special place in hell for people who abuse animals. And by breeder, I mean reputable, health testing, registering, true definition of a breeder. 

Post # 71
Member
1842 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2016

ChasingZenith :  I understand that they exist now and today because humans have bred them in the past. Same for cows and chickens and all other “food animals.” I just don’t think that the continued practice of breeding them, especially when so many are forced to die due to overpopulation, is necessary. 

Service animals are a slightly different matter. I wish we didn’t have to breed other creatures for humans, but I get it in that circumstance. However, breeding non-service animal hypoallergenic dogs simply for people who have allergies and want a pet, I do not agree with from a philosophical point of view. A lot of people get specific bred dogs because “they won’t bark as much” or “they won’t shed as much” or “they’re good with kids.” I do not think those are good excuses in my world view. Again, a world view that I acknowledge is not shared by everyone. 

Post # 72
Member
2986 posts
Sugar bee

Lavender28 :  Wolves don’t exist for human pleasure. The dog breeds you see today, absolutely do. 

It’s not as though there was a pack of labradors running around pulling fowl out of a lake, or rat terriers digging tunnels to get varmin, or border collies herding bison randomly across the world. Breeds of dogs were bred, very specifically, over decades to get desired qualities to aid humans. Every breed you see today was somehow crafted over years and years to be what they are today. 

Now, lots of “breeders” have ruined breeds and breed standards aren’t necessarily what they used to be, but that doesn’t change the origin of these breeds. 

Post # 73
Member
1842 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2016

MsPlucky :  To me, it is irrelevant how dogs were bred over the years. What happened before us, we cannot control. What happens now and in the future, we can control. I do not believe that as humans we have the right to own dogs for our pleasure, whether that’s to help us hunt (can’t really support that anyway because I’m against hunting) or to cuddle with us when we watch tv. Especially when the supply and demand sides are so skewed and so many perfectly good dogs end up dead. 

Post # 74
Member
5109 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: December 2014

Lavender28 :  So you believe we should just let dogs die out? Or we should set them loose and let them be wild?

Post # 75
Member
1842 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2016

SithLady :  I’m not really sure. I don’t have strong feelings about that. If they’re able to be in the wild and survive without human intervention, that might work. But if they died out, I don’t think that would be the worst thing ever. Just like when people say “what would happen to all the cows if everyone stopped eating meat?” If they don’t exist anymore I guess that’s how it works. 

Realistically I know this isn’t going to happen anytime soon, so I’m not set on any particular outcome. Given that there are very few restrictions on breeding today, it would take years for us to get to the point where no one is breeding at all, and beyond that, that all dogs are spayed and neutered so none were born “naturally.” Of course, it would take even longer since most people don’t agree with me in the first place. 

Leave a comment


Find Amazing Vendors