(Closed) BTDT moms: transitioning back to work after baby – what did you do?

posted 4 years ago in Babies
Post # 2
Member
4057 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

…I dunno, I think at 3-4 months you might be underestimating the time you would actually spend with her, and how much work you would really be able to get done. My husband works from home fulltime, and there are days when the dog is sick and he barely has time to deal with THAT!

Post # 3
Member
9818 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2013

I’m not sure what your job is and how demanding the workload is…does it take you the full 8 hours to get everything in or is there more downtime/flexibility?

All I will say is that working a fullday (or fulltime) in most normal jobs from home while watching a child means that you really WILL NOT be able to put in the full 8 hours of work. And it will only get worse (meaning you’ll get even less work done) as the kid gets older. I have seen plenty of WAHM who also put in working hours after the kid goes to bed simply because they are too distracted during the day to get all their work done

I worked from home one day a week ago (forced to due to power outages) and didn’t get anything done hardly except during a 3 hours nap window.  That is how demanding toddlers can be.  Now, if this is only a temporary thing until the baby is maybe 6mo old it is more doable.  They can’t move around much before 6 mo so it will be easier on you to get more work done.  I’d probably do 3 days in the office and 2 at home though to swing the balance more to being at work.  You will spend more time with the baby than you think. 

My husband works from home full time and we even have a sitter part time and when he’s alone with our toddler he gets almost ZERO done.

Overall I think it would be doable for the first 6mo but after that probably not so much unless you had a sitter or help.  Of course, a lot of this depends on what type of job: how much concentration is needed? if it’s work you can get done piece by piece (like in a minute or two- like data entry) or takes you 10 min to figure out where you left off from last time?  Do you have lots of phone calls or conference calls to make (cause crying baby in the background doesn’t work there), is it more independent work or email/customer service focused?  etc.  

I am not in customer service exactly but the “customers” I work with need emails and updates every day so it’s a lot to stay focused on many different ongoing projects.  I could have worked at home I think the first 6 mo.  I would say NO WAY after that age though.  In other fields, like maybe web design or graphic design or something where you have a project to work on that you can pickup/put down easily and not have people relying on you for constant updates/help/feedback eveyr hour might be a little easier to be a WAHM.

Post # 4
Member
7430 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: February 2013

I’m a Stay-At-Home Mom now, but I went back to work PT after DD#1 was born. I can’t imagine how work at home moms can get anything done without having someone else in the house to be there to take care of the baby. They’re just so needy and time consuming!

Post # 6
Member
7430 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: February 2013

rittenhousenewbee:  I think a lot of it depends on the baby too. Mine wouldn’t sleep alone or let me put her down almost at all during the day. She took 30 minute naps for a very long time. Banking on being able to get work done while the baby sleeps isn’t something I would do until you get to know your baby’s needs/personality.

I think taking baby to grandma’s house/having grandma over to watch the baby could work, but I think it will be much more difficult once baby turns into a running/jumping/needy/noisy toddler with opinions!

Post # 7
Member
3823 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

You will not be able to multi task. Their schedule changes way too often to schedule meetings, teleconferences around them.

I telework twice a week and both days, my daughter goes to glorious wonderful daycare. I can get a lot done for the house – and not just for her. And I get more time to bond with her because I don’t have a long commute cutting hours out of my day. So I drop her off a little later and pick her up on time and sometimes we go for walks right after, or we run errands together. I love it.

I also feel like I’m taking care of home a lot better without feeling exhausted all the time.

I went back to work at 11 weeks. I tried to keep my daughter at home for 2 weeks after I started back and it was terrible.

Here’s a photo of me holding my daughter’s pacifier in her mouth (because if I didn’t, she would cry and wail and then it will fall out, and then she would cry louder) while I’m on the other side of the camera, trying to listen in to a conference call and write with my left hand. I’m right-handed 🙁

Trust me. 12 weeks at home with your baby is enough. Arrange for childcare and keep your teleworking days to yourself. You will need the time.

 

Post # 8
Member
1445 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2015

rittenhousenewbee:  I work from home full time and could not be the primary caregiver for an infant during my shift.

Even though I am in a management position and do not always have to be tied to my computer, oftentimes with meetings and scheduled activities, I am. Some days I can’t even get away to grab something to eat.

 I don’t know how flexible your work schedule is, but it could be unrealistic to expect to get any real work done while caring for an infant, so the company would likely be getting the short end of the stick.

Maybe you could have the grandparents keep the baby in your house so that you’re at home with him/her, but not the primary care giver and you are actually able to get work done while still sneaking in some bonding time. That’s my plan when we conceive.  

Post # 9
Member
7310 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2011 - Bed & Breakfast

You can work from home, but you still need someone there who can provide childcare while you are working. Otherwise you’ll end up half-doing both tasks 9working and childcare).

I’ll be working from home 3 days a week after LO arrives, but we will still have a full-time nanny. Nanny will be there on the days that I work from home as well as the days that I head into the office. I will be available to nurse LO when he’s hungry, and will consider those my break + lunch times. But otherwise, Nanny will be responsible for diaper changes, playtime, cuddles, etc. because I will be working and I owe my employer my attention. Afterall, that’s what they pay me for!

Post # 11
Member
6886 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

 

rittenhousenewbee:  I know where I work you can not have a child at home with you unless you have another adult to watch said child. I telecommute and honestly you are not going to get any work done if your child is there. I know there are days when we do not have daycare so at times we have my mom stay with us and watch our child.  Even with them upstairs it is hard for me to get work done, especially if hear my little boy crying out his eyes for something.

 

Post # 12
Member
597 posts
Busy bee

I think your plan is a good one! I’m sitting here with my three month old right now – it’s 4:30pm and the only work I did all day was to swap two loads of laundry and feed myself. 😛 But he does actually sleep a lot, just not in nice convenient two hour chunks in a crib. So if you had grandma look after him while you worked, and then you spent your breaks and lunch bonding with baby, that could work out really well! Plus you could continue breastfeeding on demand if you were into that.

Post # 13
Member
1007 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: December 2016

I think your last idea is great and I woud also play it by ear. My daughter happens to be an easier baby who rarely cries and slept a LOT the first 6 months of her life. Friend’s babies were only taking short 30 to 45 minute naps at a time but my daughter took two 2 hous naps. So I was able to get a lot done and probably could have made phone calls etc if I needed to. (I am sure the next baby will not be like this, cant be that lucky). 

So you might have a better idea after your first month with her. 

Post # 14
Member
1007 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: December 2016

I also wanted to add that it is so great that your schedule is so flexible. That is wonderful!

Post # 15
Member
1341 posts
Bumble bee

TaurianDoll:  that’s a big statement to make, that 12 weeks at home is enough. I think it’d be very personal. Most of our friends have taken 9-12 months off (in Aus they have to hold our jobs for a year), and all have barely been ready to go back then. 

 

is it an arrangement you have to work out with work before you have bubba? I think it’s something that you’ll get a better sense off after bubs comes so if you could keep them posted them and make decisions then, you are more likely to make one that is right for you. 

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