(Closed) Bullmastiff anyone???

posted 10 years ago in Pets
Post # 18
Member
7429 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2009

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@ItWasntMe: Hmmm, I would say the sooner the better. I woudl call around to the training facilities to see how young they take them. Especially the mastiff, they grow really quickly and you want to make sure you can handle them and train them before they get too big and are too difficult

Post # 19
Member
138 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: November 2011

I definately agree there is nothing to worry about with large breed dogs. I prefer them myself especially since I was attacked by our family shih tzu when I was younger.  Most large dogs are just gentle giants and will try to be your lap dogs as long as you let them.  Just make sure they are well socialized and there should be no problem, and I agree with whoever said little dogs tend to get away with more.

Post # 20
Member
2560 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: July 2010

I wouldn’t be so concerned about the size, I have a Newfoundland dog, so he is about the size of the Bullmastiff, and I would trust kids around him more than any other dog I know.

Often those giant breed dogs, when properly trained and socialized (ie exposed to kids, many different people, and animals as early and frequently as possible) are the most gentle and kind dogs to have children around.

My Newfoundland dog as a natural affinity to children, and really likes to soothe and comfort them with kisses or by standing tightly beside them to be cuddled. 

I did put a lot of work into training and socializing my dog – we did the Petsmart obedience classes, because I loved that they were in the store, with lots of distractions and people milling around. If your daughter finds a trainer she trusts, they will really help her to find the best ways to cope with her dog, like when Charlie was about 100 pounds we had some pulling issues that weren’t easily remedied, so we ended up using a prong collar to help control him – initially I was opposed, but the trainer really thought it would help, and I trusted her, so I gave it a shot, and it worked really well for him.

We also made good use of my friends and families kids and pets to socialize him. We had a few “puppy parties” as well, because I had a few friends with puppies around the same age (and all different sizes, him my Newfoundland dog, to a Bishon).

I know this is getting long, but I hope it eases your mind a bit/

 

Post # 21
Member
3525 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

I have a pit bull mix and she’s the sweetest thing ever! Seriously. More gentle than my ILs Shelties.

There are a couple bull mastiffs on our block and they are so sweet and good natured.

And like all others said, like humans, it’s all in parenting.

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@MrsSl82be:

Agreed. As soon as they have all their shots they can start obedience training. We started our pup at around 11 weeks and we got her at 10 weeks. It’s important to start socialization with other dogs and humans early on!

Your local SPCA will likely have cheap obedience class and or puppy playgroups.

Post # 22
Member
275 posts
Helper bee

My boyfriend’s family has 3 English Mastiffs and they are huge! They’ve knocked me down when I’ve played with them because they don’t realize how strong they are. But they are all gentle giants, with any breed I think it all depends on the training. The sooner the better!

Post # 23
Member
2808 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

Sooner rather than later is always good when it comes to starting training. Getting them well socialized to children and other dogs is really easy to do when they are still puppies.

That being said, there is a Bullmastiff in my neighborhood dog play group and she (her name is Lily hahaha) runs around with the little kids and my 25 pound Corgi like it’s nothing. Super gentle and very sweet. Huge and drooly, but really a pleasure to be around.

 

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@norab2684: Not trying to pick on you or anything, but it’s not always good to make sweeping generalizations about a particular breed. I’ve been bitten by my parent’s weiner dog, and my brother was bitten by a rat terrier. Not to say that there aren’t a few poorly behaved Bullmastiffs out there, but I think it’s all in the way they’re raised. Like I said, not trying to pick on you but I just don’t want the OP to be frightened of a perfectly good dog just because it’s big or because someone on the internet somwhere knows someone who got bitten ๐Ÿ™‚

Post # 24
Member
4822 posts
Honey bee

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@Ms Mini: Ditto.

Who cares the size (in terms of personality and temperament) but the type of dog.  

At my small dog park there are the most annoying dogs and yappy ill-behaved dogs! (mos are chihuahua sp?)

Training is key. 

http://animal.discovery.com/breedselector/dogprofile.do?id=2380

Good news Bullmastiffs are easy to train and low energy, but tend to not be friendly to strangers, so early socialization is key

Pitbulls I wont comment on because it is a highly debatable, but I do not like them.

http://www.dogsbite.org/dangerous-dogs-pitbull-myths.htm

Post # 25
Member
7286 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2011

I’d like to throw out there that BREEDING makes a huge difference. A reputable breeder that is known to produce quality dogs with good temperament is your safest bet. Second to that is your socialization, exercise and training!

Post # 28
Member
438 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: April 2011

I didn’t read through all of the other remarks, so I’m sorry if I’m repeating what someone else said ๐Ÿ™‚

I have a great dane and a ridgeback, and I’m a lover of big dogs.  I’ve been around many of them and I have to say that, although the size of them can be daunting, it seems to be that the bigger the dog, the bigger the heart… and the more they think they’re a lap dog.  They have the opposite of a Napoleon complex, in that they tend to be big scared-i-cats haha.  But, the biggest thing to know is, as with all breeds, you need to make sure you start training with them young, and keep with it as they go through the adolescent stages.  And include your children in the training so the dogs will know their place.  It’s so worth it in the end!

LOVE those pictures!!!!

Post # 29
Member
7429 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2009

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@lefeymw: Yeah that’s awesome, I soooo believe what I read online. Just because its .org doesn’t mean its true.  I will not take over this thread to post all of the info that totally goes against everything that site says.  I will say this though, pit bulls are not even in the top 5 national average of most dog bites. You wanna know who are? Little dogs “ankle biters” if you will. There are a lot of dogs that have certain undesirable traits, but pit bulls are among the sweetest dogs around. Just look at all the news (besides all the crap they throw out there, I find it apalling that they only put pit bull “attacks” in the news, and not all the good things) out there of the great stories of the Michael Vick dogs.  Dogs who are used as bait dogs, or fought to within an inch of their lives, but then go on to be totally rehabilitated and live out calm, non aggressive lives after the fact.

You can feel the way you want, but please don’t put up a site that targets certain breeds, and don’t target ALL breeds. I think if you looked elsewhere, you would find that pits are much more docile than a lot of other vreeds

Post # 30
Member
7429 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2009

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@BabyBoecksMom: I LOVE Great Danes!! I can’t wait to have a big enough yard to get a bunch of dogs, including a Great Dane, bull terrier, Old English bulldog… ๐Ÿ™‚

Post # 31
Member
4822 posts
Honey bee

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@MrsSl82be:I do know all that you wrote, but I also know more than a few “good dogs” gone bad. unfortunately when these dogs go bad, its not just a bite, but a full on attack

example 1) a friend that had pitbulls for his entire life (hes nearing 40) he had two siblings and one turn on the other after 6 years. They had to put one down. They were from reputable breeders

example 2) A friend that is rescued 3 pitbull puppies less than a year old at different times. She can not keep two of them anywhere near each other or they will go at each others necks.

I have never known another dog to attack to kill, bite yes, but not attack to kill. Both these people were avid pitbull advocates until these things happened. I witnessed one of the attacks of example 1.

They are bred to fight in many areas, which means those that don’t fight well die. Which means those that do fight well live on to breed, which helps to define its DNA in some aspect. Its the Darwinian theory with a human involvement. Something from the ASPCA.

“When two dogs fight, the conflict is usually ritualized. The objective is for one dog to win the disagreement with little or no bloodshed. The participants try to intimidate each other by engaging in plenty of dramatic-looking behavior, which may include posturing, circling, growling, showing teeth and snarling. Bites delivered during a fight are typically inhibited because the point is to cause pain but not necessarily to inflict serious injuries. Pit bulls have been bred to behave differently during a fight. They may not give warning before becoming aggressive, and they’re less likely to back down when clashing with an opponent. When provoked, they may become aggressive more readily than another breed might. Sometimes they don’t inhibit their bites, so they may cause injury more often than other dogs.”

http://www.aspcabehavior.org/articles/193/The-Truth-About-Pit-Bulls.aspx

And its not to say there are not GREAT pets that are pitbulls. I know several that I love but I will not allow those owners to pet sit my dog. Just in case.

EDIT: I only mean I dont trust pits in relation to other animals… not towards humans (for the most part as long as they are not instigated- like most dogs)

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