(Closed) Bummed about grad school

posted 7 years ago in College
Post # 5
Member
570 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2012

@cares: YOu are correct , for my graduate courses I had a fee waiver not sure if it covered a portion of the fee or not however it was due to financial hardship that I had to prove with paystubs etc.  

I second your advice on library since they have GRE books that many community members never check out, I donated all my college course textbooks to them so that if any student ever applied to  my same college they could get it for free. The books were over $500 .

 

Post # 6
Member
3261 posts
Sugar bee

I know they are rewriting the GRE, and I heard from someone if you take it in August before the revised one comes out, the price is half off? 

Post # 7
Member
10588 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: January 2011

If you’re able to go and ask to see your file.  It’s happened to me and I’ve seen it happen to other people at different universities.  They claim they are missing a transcript/reference letter/some paperwork.  You send another, the same thing happens.  You ask to see your file, there are both copies!

Post # 8
Member
916 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: April 2011

I used to work in an admissions office, so here is my advice based on how our office ran: If you request more transcripts, I would have them sent to your home address.  Do not open them though!  Then, if you can, hand deliver them to the admissions office, or mail them with delivery confirmation (yes, this is expensive, but less expensive than requesting new transcripts).  As long as the envelopes are unopened, it should not matter who they are addressed to. Are there any other names your transcripts might have been filed under? It’s usually undergrad student workers who file the stuff as it comes in, so stuff gets mixed up, especially if you have a first name that sounds like a last name, a last name that sounds like a first name, or a hyphenated last name.  When resending them (if you can’t hand deliver them), call and confirm the exact address they should be mailed to. A lot of times people would just address stuff to “College XYZ Admissions,” which would go to the undergrad admissions office, instead of “College XYZ Graduate School Admissions.”  When people insisted they had sent stuff, we would usually send an email out to the other admissions offices on campus, and sometimes other people would have it.  So make sure you send it to the right address!

If you are confident in your letters of recommendation and personal statement, you might be able to ask them to evaluate your application without GRE scores.  This is taking a risk, however, because you need everything else to be perfect to outweigh no test scores and a low GPA.  I have known some people who got in without taking a GRE even when it was requested, but they were people with years of professional experience in the field and stellar recommendations.  Your GRE scores will be good for 5 years, and you don’t have to pay to send them if you put in the grad program’s code when you take them (make sure you have the correct code though…some schools have one code for the whole school, others have a specific code for each department. I would recommend contacting the dept to ask). 

Finally, I don’t think it’s worth it to rush taking the GRE, because it is expensive.  I would recommend asking the school if they can delay your application to admission for the spring semester (starting January 2012).  Not every school offers admission on a semester to semester basis, but if they do, you are better off doing that than rushing to apply.  They should be able to just change the semester on your application, and not charge you a new application fee.  (again, this is my experience, but every school runs their admissions differently)

Good luck! 

Post # 9
Member
10366 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2010

In all honesty, it sounds like you fumbled the process. As someone who has gone to grad school, and then sat on the other side of things helping with admissions of new students, it would appear to the committee that someone who submitted an incomplete file, had a low GPA, and had not taken the GRE wayyyyy late in the game either doesn’t care enough or is not organized enough to handle a graduate program.

Applying to a school is about putting you best, most responsible foot forward. If the $65 is such a big deal, why did you not have all your ducks in a row – early – then? Most grad schools that start programs in the fall in the USA have March deadlines and students are required to give notice as to whether they accept or not by the end of May. It is a pact amongst the school in the entire country to keep things like this from happening. The fact that it is almost August really makes me wonder what kind of program you are applying to, and whether it is reputable?

Post # 10
Member
916 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: April 2011

@crayfish: In the OP’s defense, it varies a lot between different types of graduate programs.  Yes, PhD programs usually have early deadlines and binding decisions as of April. But I used to work in the admissions office of a top-10 Library Science masters program, and they accepted applications until the class was full.  If the OP is applying to a terminal degree program, my understanding is that they tend to have more of a rolling admissions style, rather than the hard deadlines.

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