(Closed) Calling all catholics…

posted 6 years ago in Catholic
Post # 3
Member
3000 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: July 2012

In the Catholic Church, receiving the Eucharist is one of the seven holy sacraments. I know that other Christian churches do similar rites, but it is just one of the “rules” or traditions of mass. People go through a lot of religious education to prepare for their first communion and it is seen as a sacred thing that is part of the Catholic Church and our form of mass.

It’s not meant to separate guests or discriminate, it’s just a holy rite that Catholics are allowed to partake in.

Post # 5
Member
5977 posts
Bee Keeper

@Birdee106:  Hey there, not Catholic (Russian Orthodox here), but we have the same rule in our church. I believe it’s b/c you haven’t been confirmed into the faith. At least that’s why in the Orthodox church…

Post # 6
Member
1573 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2009

you have to be baptized and take first communion first before you can do this

Post # 9
Member
5075 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: October 2012

@Birdee106:   It’s just the rule of the Catholic Church.  Every religion has it’s own rules/ideas.

Post # 10
Member
408 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

Catholics believe that the bread and wine actually BECOME the body and blood of Christ – transubstantiation.  When protestant denominations serve communion, it is as a representation of the body and blood.  That’s why protestants are not allowed to take communion in the Catholic church – it means different things for Catholics and non-Catholics.

Post # 11
Member
2907 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

My understanding is that non-Catholic Christians are not supposed to take Communion because they do not believe in transubstantiation – that is, non-Catholic Christians think of Communion as symbolic of the body and blood of Christ whereas Catholics believe that the wafers and wine actually become the actual body and blood of Christ. 

Post # 14
Member
5977 posts
Bee Keeper

@Birdee106: It does matter to Catholics and Orthodox that you view it as just a symbol while we view it as the ACTUAL blood and body of Christ. That’s the point. Just b/c it doesn’t matter to you doesn’t mean it doesn’t matter to us.

Post # 15
Member
3697 posts
Sugar bee

The “Together For Life” book that is used in a lot of Catholic marriage preparation does a good job of explaining this (from p. 111-112):

… The Catholic discipline of not practicing intercommunion is based on a theology of the Eucharist: what it is, what it does, and what it signifies. Many Christian denominations do not share our Catholic understanding of the Eucharist. Some view communion as a rich symbol and a memorial of what Jesus has done for us, but for Catholics, the Eucharist is more than a memorial meal … Catholics believe that the Eucharist is a sacrament and therefore a particular kind of sign that effects or brings about what it signifies. In essence, we believe that Holy Communion doesn’t just point us to the presence of Christ, but that – through a profound mystery – it is the presence of Christ, which we consume in order to better become that divine presence in the world. But these differences regarding what Holy Communion is are not the sole obstacle to intercommunion. There is also the matter of what Holy Communion does. Catholics believe that the Eucharist draws those who receive Communion into greater unity within the Body of Christ and at the same time signifies that unity. The Eucharist, simply put, is both a sign and source of unity in the Church. Thus, the Eucharist is not only about uniting individual believers to Christ through a share in Communion but more fundamentally about uniting a community of believers together. When one receives Communion, he or she is saying yes to a communion of mind and heart with the Church. It is an act that signifies not only a spiritual union with other members of the Church but also a public affirmation of being united in the beliefs and practices of that community.

The reception of Holy Communion by members of another Christian denomination cannot be a sign of unity among those believers when, in fact, significant differences in belief and practice still remain between Catholics and those of other Christian churches. Eucharistic communion would then be a counter-sign: it would signify a unity that does not exist among these Christians …”

Sorry for such a long quote. The gist, then, is that “actions speak louder than words,” and through the action of taking Communion, we make the statement that “I believe what the Catholic Church teaches.” If you don’t consider yourself a Catholic, then that’s not really a statement you want to be making, right?

The topic ‘Calling all catholics…’ is closed to new replies.

Find Amazing Vendors