(Closed) Calling all Nurses

posted 5 years ago in Rings
Post # 2
Member
47203 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

lola5:  Nothing. Rings are fomites that can carry and spread disease.

Post # 3
Member
154 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: September 2015

I agree with PP. Our policy states no jewelry below the elbows and I think all units should have the same policy, regardless of patient population. I don’t see any reason to risk spreading germs.

Post # 6
Member
32 posts
Newbee

At our hospital I see soooo many nurses wearing beautiful rings (1-2 ct usually). Nurses know how to pick good rings and I can’t help to stare!

Post # 7
Member
1169 posts
Bumble bee

I’m an xray tech and I’ve worked in a hospital and doctors office. Both places stated no rings or watches due to not being able to clean underneath properly.

Post # 8
Member
2092 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2015

I work at a hospital and all the nurses wear their wedding sets along with anniversary RHRs, big or small, stones or not. Even our infection control manager wears her diamond rings. I think the rule about no jewelry depends on your specific workplace. 

Post # 9
Member
303 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2008

I personally don’t wear rings but I see a lot of other nurses do so. I also have come across the idea of having rings strung through a short necklace and considered it once, just haven’t yet out of habit. 

Post # 10
Member
47203 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

 The rule may change as different institutions have different policies, but frankly, the policies shouldn’t be necessaary.

All health care personnel are taught in their education program that is is absolutley impossible to properly clean in and under a ring. Even wearing gloves does not protect you or the patient.

if a nurse came to my bedside to do some care, I would ask her to take off her rings and wash her hands within my view. Antibiotic resistant bacteria are too high a risk for patients to let a nurse, or anyone else, get away with shoddy practice.

If you are not well enough to look after your own interests in hospital, I recommend you have someone with you to act as your advocate.

Post # 11
Member
67 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: May 2016

Respiratory Therapist here, and I still wear my engagement ring occasionally to work. Our hospital only has a policy in place for the NICU, so when I go work in that ICU I put my ring in my locker safely tucked inside my purse. I have a plain band that I’ve been using recently due to being scared of losing or damaging my ring, but once I get married I’ll just wear my wedding band. 

I wash my hands after patient contact/use gloves etc. There’s no way to be absolutely sterile in a hospital. Sure, rings are fomites, but so are MDs stethescopes, food trays, pens, pensils, the tv, computers, the table in the break room that every staff member eats on , and millions of dirty dirty grime under fingernails that no one ever really cleans before gloving up. Antibiotic resistant super bugs are due to a huge abuse from decades of over prescribing antibiotics. 

Post # 12
Member
212 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2015 - Bellagio, Las Vegas

I don’t wear any rings to work. Infection control and all that. Plus, I’d be afraid of losing it when taking off a glove or setting it aside to wash my hands a billion times a day. It seems like most women I work with wear their rings, though.

Post # 13
Member
47203 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

ecmj563:  But, I’m sure you have heard the old saying “two wrongs don’t make a right.” Just because other things are also fomites, doesn’t make it right for health care personnel to deliberately place their patients at risk.

Re: MDs stethescopes, food trays, pens, pensils, the tv, computers, the table in the break room that every staff member eats on ,

In our ER we all clean our stethoscope between patients, and none of the other things on the list are in direct contact from one patient to another.

We all know the cause of antibiotic resistant bacteria. We also all know we have a duty to help stop the spread from patient to patient.

Post # 14
Member
67 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: May 2016

julies1949:  You’re certainly correct that we can all do better, but I don’t deliberatly harm patients. Even when universal precautions are followed there will still be human error. No need to point fingers on the boards. 

Post # 15
Member
47203 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

ecmj563:  Deliberately choosing to wear rings around patients with compromised immune systems is an error, but not human error. It is a deliberate choice to put yourself above the safety needs of patients.

This is not pointing fingers as we are all anonymous. It is however, education for those who are not health care personnel. They need to know that it is in their best interests to ensure that their caregivers are following best practice guidelines.

The topic ‘Calling all Nurses’ is closed to new replies.

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