(Closed) Can Bee bloggers become Ms.?

posted 7 years ago in Weddingbee
Post # 3
Member
11325 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: February 2011

Yep. A few of them already are.

Post # 5
Member
2859 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2011 - Bartram's Garden

Yup, I’m a Ms.! There are several of us. 🙂

Post # 6
Member
1542 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: December 2012

Ok, mexican girl here so I’m taking advantage of the thread to ask you ladies to explain it to me.

Miss, Mistress (Mrs), what’s the long form of Ms.? can you explain the difference?

Post # 7
Hostess
18643 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2009

@Coffee cup: I’m not sure if there is a long form for it.  I always grew up saying Ms. if you weren’t sure if someone was married or unmarried.

Post # 8
Bee
2362 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2010 - New York Botanical Garden

Miss is someone unmarried, as far as I know “Mistress” is for a female child but I never hear it used, Mrs (Misus – how it sounds, not a long form of it) is for married women who use their husbands name (technically – but I think nowadays any married woman can use it), and Ms. (Miz – that’s how it sounds, not a “long form” of it) can be used by anyone – unmarried, divorced, and married women

Post # 9
Member
4485 posts
Honey bee

@Coffee_Cup, there is no long form of Ms. It was an abbreviation adopted in the 60s and 70s as part of the Women’s Lib movement where they wanted some title that did not give any indication that they were married, since Mrs supposedly meant that they “gave up their identity” and became a possession of their husband once they said vows. Somw women still hold strongly to that belief even though it has been proven time and again that it isn’t true. These days, it’s referred to simply as a title where one doesn’t know if someone is married or not. Not everyone likes the Ms title either.

Post # 10
Member
1542 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: December 2012

MissAsB, hermitcrabEmber78: Thank you ladies. Yes I didn’t mean exactly a long form rather than a pronunciation and a meaning.

Post # 11
Member
5011 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: April 2012

Miss, Mrs and Ms all have the same root and originally emerged around the same time; they’re all forms of address based on mistress. We’ve given them distinct meanings that aren’t really theirs.

Post # 12
Member
3482 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: February 2011

@MrsSaltWaterTaffy: One of my English teachers used to say, “A Miss isn’t married, a Mrs. is. And a Ms. doesn’t know what the hell she is!” LOL

Post # 14
Member
1925 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2013

I’m definitely not a Miss now, nor will I be a Mrs. when I’m married.  I’m Ms. now and will be a Ms. forever!  I don’t need to be defined by my relationship to a man!  This is particulary important because I’m a teacher 🙂

ETA: I’m also not changing my name.

Post # 15
Member
1542 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: December 2012

@zagora: Really? cool I was starting to feel lonely here.

 @Ms.GoodEarth: It’s a bit tricky in the states, I read all those posts about ladies struggling with the decision of changin their names.

In Mexico nothing happens, you don’t have the option of changing your name and you just go from “señorita” (Miss) to “señora” (Mrs. I guess), but older women are refered as señora wether they’re married or not so there’s no problem there (unless you call a 20year old señora, then you can hurt some feelings).

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