(Closed) can catholic baptism be revoked?

posted 7 years ago in Catholic
Post # 3
Member
103 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

I am not catholic, but….. I am lutheran and before my husband and i got married, my husband had to get baptised since he had never been, in order to get married. During the “baptism” meeting/classes with our pastor, he said that once you are baptised your are always baptised. I don’t see how you can un-do a baptism….

Post # 4
Member
1749 posts
Bumble bee

@Lorsee: I agree, once you are accepted into the kingdom of GOD, how can you be unaccepted? I would think his baptism would still be valid.

Post # 5
Member
270 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2001

I am also Catholic, and i have never heard of this being done.  She may have asked, but I doubt if they would have done anything about it.  I know when you start Pre Cana, they will get a copy of his baptism certificate.  This is done by calling the church where he was baptised.  This certificate carries all the records for that person.  For example, First Communion and Confirmation.  This certificate will tell you what you need to know.  

Post # 6
Member
375 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2015

She could have asked, but the answer would have been “No.” A friend of mine who left the Church actually wrote to the Vatican to see if he could officially be unbaptized, and did not get his wish. It doesn’t work that way. In the same way, you can’t call a Church and ask to not have had your First Communion, or ask a priest to de-absolve you of your sins after Confession. Just call the church where he was baptised and get the record.

Post # 7
Member
4336 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

I do not know, if, in the eyes of the Catholic church, you can be “unbaptized,” (I doubt it,) but I do know that you can write a letter to the bishop saying you renounce Catholicism. I highly doubt that a parent can do this for you.

(Writing a letter to the bishop is actually the only way to have this done. Many people go around saying, “I was baptized Catholic but I’m not Catholic anymore.” Well, actually, unless you’ve written a letter renouncing Catholicism, then the Catholic church still considers you Catholic, just unpracticing!)

I think the best way to find this out, if you are really curious, would be to call the diocesan office in which your Fiance was baptized, b/c I would assume they would keep a record of such a thing as an actual “unbaptism,” or they would be able to confirm that there is no such thing.

Post # 8
Member
730 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2010

I’m pretty sure you can’t undo a baptism. I’d call the church where he was baptized, and ask for a copy of the certificate. If there was any weird situation with his baptism (which I don’t think there would be), the church keeping his baptism records would know about it.

Post # 9
Member
347 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: April 2010

@Lorsee:  No.   Baptism is for life.   That said, just as we can invalidly marry, we can be invalidly baptised. 

You stated that a marriage can be annullled.  Its important to understand that an annulllment rules that the marriage was invalid.  It does not undo the marriage.  It states that something was lacking at the time of the wedding that rendered the attempt at marrying invalid.

There can be cases where people have been invalidly baptized.  The Church requires people to be baptized either through pouring water over the head or by emersion.  Baptisms are considered invalid if someone merely sprinkles you with water.  Also, a person can’t be baptised with a substance other than water (it seems people have actually attempted this).  We also baptise people in the name of the father, son and holy spirit. 

This is important when it comes to the fact that we recognize the validity of baptisms occuring among other Christian groups.  When non-Catholic Christian seeks to convert to Catholicism, if he was validly baptised in his previous place of worship, he will only receive his first Holy Communion and confirmation at the Easter Vigil Mass where he will come into full communion with the Church.  If he was not validly baptised, than he’ll receive all 3 sacraments of initiation at the Easter Vigil. 

Post # 10
Member
3220 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: February 2012

@twoangels:  When non-Catholic Christian seeks to convert to Catholicism, if he was validly baptised in his previous place of worship, he will only receive his first Holy Communion and confirmation at the Easter Vigil Mass where he will come into full communion with the Church.  If he was not validly baptised, than he’ll receive all 3 sacraments of initiation at the Easter Vigil. 


(You may know this, but the OP may not.) This isn’t a quick process– it’s called Rite of Christian Intiation of Adults (RCIA). RCIA is generally a 9-month long course in which you go to weekly classes and meetings after the homily each Sunday.  (I’m in it right now!)  Even if you’re baptised, if you haven’t received Holy Communion then you are considered a “Candidate” for the entire process until you receive the other sacraments at Easter Vigil. 

 

Post # 11
Member
229 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: November 2012

Once a catholic, always a catholic is what I have heard from a priest. Even if you convert to another religion or become an athiest, you cant cleanse yourself from the catholic baptism.

 

 

Post # 12
Bee
1433 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2012 - Historic Lougheed House

YES!  Your Catholic baptism can be cancelled.  It is called a formal act of defection. 

I was raised in the RCC and I requested a formal act of defection when I was 18.  This essentially nullifies my baptism.  I had to write a letter to the Bishop of the dioceses I was baptized in, and then meet with a couple nuns to show them they couldn’t save me.  

As far as my research, and the nuns and Bishop told me, the baptism can’t be “cancelled” because it was a historical event, but I am no longer a baptized member of the church, I am not counted in their numbers, and I am not free of original sin anymore.  

My baptismal and confirmation/communion certificates were destroyed.  Some people say that this process doesn’t exist officially in the church, but I went thru it and met with several religious officials along the way. It IS possible.  

If you’d like more information on the process of the formal act of defection… visit: 

http://www.atheistactivist.org/Defect.html

http://forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=11268

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Formal_act_of_defection_from_the_Catholic_Church

Post # 13
Member
347 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: April 2010

@eagle:  You need to read your own links. 

“the fact of this formal act was to be noted in the register of the person’s baptism. This annotation, like other annotations in the baptismal register, such as those of marriage or ordination, was unrelated to the fact of the baptism: it was not a “debaptism” (a term sometimes used journalistically): the fact of having been baptized remained a fact, and the Catholic Church holds that baptism marks a person with a seal or character that “is an ontological and permanent bond which is not lost by reason of any act or fact of defection”.”

It’s also no longer possible to do this:

The motu proprio Omnium in mentem of 26 October 2009 removed from the canons in question all reference to an act of formal defection from the Catholic Church.[5][6][7] Accordingly, “it is no longer appropriate to enter attempts at formal defection in the sacramental records since this juridic action is now abolished. “[8]

In late August 2010, the Holy See confirmed that it was no longer possible to defect formally from the Catholic Church.[9] However, the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Dublin declared on 12 October 2010 that it intended to keep a register of those who expressed the wish to defect.[9][10] Since this fell short of making an annotation in the baptismal register, CountMeOut, an association in the archdiocese that had been promoting formal defections from the Catholic Church thereupon ceased to provide defection forms.[11][12]

Although the act of “formal defection” from the Catholic Church has thus been abolished, “public defection” from the Catholic faith or from the communion of the Church is of course possible, as is expressly recognized in the Code of Canon Law.[13] Even private defection is subject to the automatic spiritual penalty of excommunication laid down in canon 1364 of the Code of Canon Law.”

Post # 14
Bee
1433 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2012 - Historic Lougheed House

@twoangels:  I did it pre 2009. 

Post # 15
Member
3771 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

“I confess ONE baptism for the forgiveness of sins”-Nicene Creed

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