(Closed) Can Catholics become ordained?

posted 6 years ago in Ceremony
Post # 3
Member
1695 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 2012

I dont really understand your question. Can you please clarify? What do you mean ‘on or off court’? And what do you mean ‘dire hard’?  Get ordained for what? To officiate at your wedding? 

Post # 4
Member
151 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

@WillyNilly:  Hmmmm. Well:

 

1. In the Catholic faith, only a Priest or a Deacon can oversee a wedding. (I don’t know if the word ‘oversee’ is correct, but I say it instead of ‘perform’ because the Priest or Deacon does not ‘perform’ the wedding, the couple does.)

2. Only males can be Priest or Deacons, just as only females can be Nuns. As a consequence, she could not oversee the wedding because she could not be a Priest or Deacon.

3. Ordination is not something one does on a whim, it’s not merely something one does so that a couple can get married. It is a serious commitment, not a gag! I think that almost any religion would find this offensive, and besides, it would take many years of study.

Post # 5
Member
3697 posts
Sugar bee

@WillyNilly:  Grixis857 is right on all counts. The best word, I think, would be “witness” the marriage, which your friend could certainly do as Maid/Matron of Honor, but as a good Catholic she couldn’t fill the role of celebrant/officiant/presider.

It depends, too, on whether you are Catholic/wanting a Catholic wedding, or if you just want your Catholic friend to become qualified to perform a secular service so that you will have a legal wedding (i.e. have her get “ordained” over the internet in the Universal Life Church or something). The short answer is yes, asking her to do that could put her in a troublesome position, theologically speaking. How troublesome depends, in part, on what you do or don’t believe and whether you and your fiance are baptized, but I’m pretty sure that no matter what, it would be problematic for her.

It’s a little complicated, but, the Church believes that when a Christian (any baptized person) enters into marriage, it is a sacrament. For Catholics, we are obligated to marry in the Church, and if we marry outside of it we are committing a sin and can’t take Communion unless and until the marriage is convalidated (i.e. receives a blessing from the Church). So, in a nutshell, if either you or your fiance were baptized (even if you aren’t practicing) and your devout Catholic friend helps you get married in a non-church wedding, that puts her in the position of facilitating a marriage that the Church regards as invalid, so that would make her guilty of committing a pretty serious sin.

If neither of you are Christian and never were baptized, then I’m not 100% sure. I still think that it would be problematic for her because she would be assuming a function that, according to her beliefs, she should not be undertaking. However, one could make the case that by helping you to get married in a “natural” marriage (i.e. a marriage between unbaptized persons, a non-sacramental marriage) she is preventing you from living in sin … so this might still be sinful but perhaps less serious.

I realize that if you’re not Catholic this all probably sounds like silly hair-splitting to you, but think of it this way: if your friend really is devout, then these are important distinctions because it matters to her whether or not she is in good standing with her own faith, right? The best thing for her to do would be to go directly to her priest with the question and all the relevant details and just ask. Be prepared that the answer will probably be “no,” and that might be frustrating to you, but the most loving thing you could do for your friend would be to respect her beliefs even if you disagree with them and not put her in a difficult situation vis a vis the church.

Post # 6
Member
163 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: June 2011

Well technically speaking no.  However I was married by a catholic person who works at a catholic college, gasp.  It is more about the persons convictions and beliefs it is something she will have to pray about and decided.  By the way the person who married us and I both talked to two priest on the matter both of them understood the situation and believed that God would as well. But technically it a reason your friend could not receive communion, if she believes that you can not get communion due to certain sins.  

Post # 8
Member
151 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

@WillyNilly:  Oh, now it makes so much more sense why he said his faith “doesn’t allow it.” Yes, that would be accurate – his faith does not allow him to preside over a wedding if he is not ordained.

In any event, he can probably get ordained in some kind of generic “Christian” religion online in a few days, but then again I don’t know if he would find that sacreligious.

Post # 9
Member
131 posts
Blushing bee

If it is Roman Catholic only a priest can marry the couple

Post # 10
Member
151 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

@braz:  That’s not entirely true – it could be a Priest OR a Deacon.

Post # 11
Member
131 posts
Blushing bee

@Grixis857:  Sorry ! I should have researched it, I was totally sure about it… thanks for the info 🙂

Post # 12
Member
151 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

@braz:  No problem. I should correct myself, though, because this is a bit complicated.

-Some Weddings are Masses, others are not.

-A couple where both the man and the woman are practicing Catholics will often opt for a Mass. They may always choose not to have a Mass, though.

-A Priest is neccesary for a Mass. So if the Wedding is a Mass, then a Priest MUST be present. A Deacon may also be present, but a Priest is required.

-A Priest is NOT necessary for a Wedding that is NOT a Mass. Therefore, it is OK for a Deacon to preside at a Wedding without a Priest in these situations.

 

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