(Closed) Can you spot a moissanite (versus diamond) in real life?

posted 7 years ago in Rings
Post # 153
Member
83 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

From “Moissyco”

“Unlike diamonds which are most commonly cut to maximize carat weight, Moissanite gemstones are cut and faceted to maximize the superior fire and brilliance of the gemstone.”

<Of course unless you have an ideal or super ideal cut stone, which IS cut to maximize fire and brilliance, but most people don’t>

“The Moissanite ideal cut pattern was established after years of studying the angles of light refraction through Moissanite. Although the facets on a standard round-brilliant cut Moissanite are the same in number and are very close to the measurement to the customary 57-facet round brilliant cut diamond, subtle differences exist. These subtle differences are exactly what contribute to Moissanite’s ideal cut standards different than “ideal cut” proportions that might be associated with other gemstones or diamonds.”


Moissanites are cut differently to maximize the beauty in that particular substance. Diamonds are cut the way they are to maximize their beauty. Moissanites are flat and have large tables. They commonly look like they have black holes in the middle. The cutting style looks haphazard from the top view and they do not have arrows. They are also doubly refractive and have a different kind of sparkle, as many have mentioned previously. They do not sparkle more, they sparkle different and LOOK different. Not from 10 feet away, but if you were to actually take a look and examine and attempt to differentiate them, it is easy.

 

If you were going to ask me to differentiate a diamond OEC vs a moissanite OEC it would be a bit more difficult given that they mimicked the cutting style well, you would have to be able to see it in person and see how it plays with the light to tell.

Post # 154
Member
6354 posts
Bee Keeper

@JoolyBee:  a $15K 3 carat diamond would not look very nice at all. Your estimates are actually very conservative!

Post # 156
Member
127 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

@JoolyBee:  a decent 3 carat stone is more in the $25-50K range. 

Post # 157
Member
1784 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

@EffieTrinket:  But are you a real Tiffany or a fake Tiffany?  If you’re a hologram, then I don’t want nothin’ to do with you.

Post # 158
Member
477 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

I think that the “fake Tiffany” thing was weird too.  It’s a round diamond solitare.  I can’t think of anything more basic.  Besides, its just an inscription on the inside of the ring, so it doesn’t matter much.  Now if the inscription was on the outside and “fake” Tiffany rings were being sold with that I could see taking issue. 

Post # 159
Member
1146 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

@JoolyBee:  Well, thanks, I did do quite a bit of research when my fiance and I started looking into it, and I’d like to think I learned something 🙂

My ring actually cost a decent amount more more than that range, but we got a great deal going through a friend whose family has a wholesale license. I didn’t say large diamonds are affordable for “a lot” of people in general — I just meant that they absolutely are affordable to some, and in my area, quite a bit more people than just “some!” I live in Los Angeles where I dont even know anyone personally with under a carat..fatoring in total weight, i know few with under 2. I also don’t know many people that DONT drive luxury cars or have at least a few designer bags — that’s just the situation here, in my circle. I am also in my late 20s, so I am not sure how “young” that makes me…but my fiance is in his mid 30s and worked very hard in finance for about a decade before we met, no family money on his side allthough there is a decent amount on mine.

My point was really to say that I would never assume, from the size of a stone alone, that it is real or fake. I wouldn’t assume a large stone is more likely to be fake because that person could not afford it, just like I would not assume that a small stone probably means that person could not afford larger. Some people choose a small stone regardless what they have in the bank.

I was (perhaps poorly) trying to make a statement about what I see as all this weirdness surrounding assumption. I feel like there is such a double standard — if you have a large ring, then it must be fake, or he must have gone into debt, or you must not also be able to afford a nice house/cars/trips etc in addition to the ring. But if you have a smaller ring, then it’s none of that, its just simply beautiful and god have mercy on the soul of anyone who says ANYthing remotely negative about it, even if its just a personal preference/opinion.

But I digress 🙂

 

Post # 160
Member
1146 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

@BuBuBubbles:  I’m not sure what you mean, because first you say people just CANT tell the difference…but then you qualify that by u saying “unless….” So…can’t you deduce that you can, therefore, see a difference? The OP asked “CAN” you tell the difference….not “if you remove XYZ factors, then can you STILL tell a difference?”

So…what if you are in the right lighting, have exceptional eyes, knowledge of how diamonds are cut, AND have somehow found a way to spend a few minutes out of their busy schedule to look at the stones up close….and spot a difference? Even if it takes all of those circumstances to spot the difference…said difference is still spotted, and therefore it’s possible.

I don’t know what purpose it would serve to LIE about being able to tell a difference. Even the companies that produce these things can point out actual differences between the two…are they lying too?

I apologize if I’m being argumentative, I just didn’t see the reasoning there.

Post # 161
Member
1926 posts
Buzzing bee

@BuBuBubbles:  The “fake Tiffany” commented was first directed at the Legacy…cause you know, god forbid someone would want to stick their cushion cut stone inside a bezel halo… 

Post # 162
Member
1443 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

@gsu02olliff:  I agree, who cares?  I have a diamond, but I never heard of Mossy until I came to this website.  People can be very judgmental; that’s probably why some choose to “pass off” their non-diamonds as diamonds.  It’s not the ring that truly counts, it’s the sentiment.  I’m sure those who on here who are either engaged or married have to agree.  Life’s too short to be snarky.  I’ve seen so many lovely rings, of assorted stones and sizes and think that’s awesome.  Play nice, people.

Post # 163
Member
242 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: February 2008

@valintine:  I’m sorry, and I say this with respect, but how you can say what other people can and can’t see with their own eyes?  I agree that the difference between the two is difficult to see in pictures, and I don’t think I could tell the difference on a passing glance, but when looking at the 2 stones close up – yes, I CAN tell a difference.  They simply perform differently.  No better, no worse, just different.  

Post # 164
Member
242 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: February 2008

double post.  sorry.

Post # 165
Member
553 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2013

@wellheeledmama:  That makes it even less affordable then! 

Post # 166
Member
553 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2013

@polyblonde:  I think where I live determines my perception a great deal, and why it’s easier to question the size of a stone vs what type of stone it is. It would make sense for what you are describing to be the norm in LA where the standard of living is higher in some areas. I love expensive beautiful jewelry no matter what type of stone, just haven’t gotten myself a good collection yet, so maybe I’ll need to move myself out your way 🙂

Post # 167
Member
553 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2013

@joya_aspera:  Well, I’ll be the first to admit I really had no clue, I was hoping you all would know the answer! 

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