(Closed) Career Woman or Stay-At-Home-Mom

posted 5 years ago in Parenting
  • poll: What should I do?
    Career Woman : (24 votes)
    27 %
    Stay-At-Home-Mom : (11 votes)
    12 %
    Career Now, Stay-At-Home-Mom Later : (54 votes)
    61 %
  • Post # 2
    Member
    391 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: January 2015

    New grad RN jobs are hard to come by, and its even harder for a old new grad (graduated more than a year ago) to get a nursing job. I understand having baby fever, but do not choose to not work after graduating! I would graduate, get a solid year of working experience, then switch to per diem when you have the baby and only work a couple of shifts a month to stay employed and keep your skills from hgetting rusty. Maybe start trying to get pregnant aftr 9 months of working? 

    I know alot of nurses who have years of nursing experience that are having terrible time getting back into the workforce after taking just one or two years off to have kids. 

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 8 months ago by  Vanilla-latte.
    Post # 3
    Member
    9225 posts
    Buzzing Beekeeper

    I’ll leave it to other Bees who know more about the intricacies of the nursing world to give more pointed advice, but I’ll just say that the majority of people who say that they’ll go back to school in 5 years don’t end up ever going back, especially if they have a 5-year-old at that point in time. Even the most well-intentioned. So I would keep that in mind.

    Post # 4
    Member
    61 posts
    Worker bee
    • Wedding: January 2013

    I’m not sure why this has to be a mutually exclusive situation. Growing up, both my parents worked and raised my brother and I. Today, I run my own business, and my brother makes a decent living. I guess the question is really for yourself: Would you rather have your kids look up to a woman who can and have it all: a successful career and a successful family earned through hardwork and determination, or would you prefer your kids to look up to an accomplish house maker? There’s no right answer. It’s just a question of your personal values.

    Post # 5
    Member
    6447 posts
    Bee Keeper

    mariatcast:  I did both.  Career woman and mother.  Its hard but it is doable.  My husband is more the stay at home father than I am.  And it is hard, I miss my daughter terribly, but I know it’s for the good of her.

    Post # 6
    Member
    158 posts
    Blushing bee
    • Wedding: May 2015 - backyard wedding!!

    Vanilla-latte:  agree with PP- I’m a nurse for 20 years- it’s really hard for new grads now to get jobs- much harder if you graduate and then start working right away because you take time off d/t family or whatever. It will be difficult. I suggest working for a bit then having a kid- but that’s just a suggestion from a random person you don’t know! Congrats on being almost done w your nursing degree! We always need more nurses! Yay! 

    Post # 7
    Member
    1552 posts
    Bumble bee

    Im a daycare worker and I see parents go through these struggles all the time. Im firmly in the ‘establish family before career’ camp. It just makes more sense to me to have a family and raise children before establishing a career and then having to take a big break from it/ struggling with idea to put kids into full time daycare. Especially if you have baby fever, want children and are financially able to do so now. There is no reason to rush into children at your age but at the same time if you want them and can financially do so, there is little point waiting (my opinion based on knowing many parents who waited and now struggle with fertility- of course this isnt the case for everyone but it can happen). I agree with others that its good to be a role model to children by working but honestly your children will not understand all your hard work until they hit their teens so it is still possible to be a role model by developing your career when they start infant school. 

    Post # 8
    Member
    2449 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: May 2013

    I’m a nurse, 29 and 6yrs experience. I did bedside for 5.5 yrs and just started a great office job doing safety reporting, almost the same salary and totally flexible hrs and working for the same company so I keep my benefits. I also recently found out I’m pregnant! That’s how I will get to have it all. We will use the onsite daycare at my hospital when baby #1 arrives in November and I will likely work 7-3 But I can adjust that to whatever I need as long as I get in my 40 hrs/week. Might be worth it to look into alternataive nursing jobs, but it could be a problem if you want to do bedside as you don’t gain or practice those skills in a job like my current one. I do know that people have gone on from my dept to return to bedside so that is an option if I choose it later..but I have no plans to do so. Bedside is rough on the lifestyle-schedules at work take priority over family and I was just done with that. You also need certain amounts of clinical experience for certain advanced degree programs though. 

    Post # 9
    Member
    4192 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: July 2012 - Baltimore Museum of Industry

    My vote is to finish your education and get a year of experience before TTC. If you have more than one child, you may be out of the work force longer than expected. Having prior work experience will make a *huge* difference.

    Post # 10
    Member
    9595 posts
    Buzzing Beekeeper
    • Wedding: September 2015

    I think it’s much easier to get back into the workforce if you have some experience before you leave. 5 years out of school with no work experience doesn’t make you too desirable of a candidate. 4 years work experience will only put you at late 20s its win/win. Establish yourself as a professional so you have no problem getting back into it later. 

    Post # 11
    Member
    2449 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: May 2013

    Especially in nursing where chances are you won’t get your top pick of specialty/location/schedule for your first job. May take a few years to actually get into what you want! 

    Post # 12
    Member
    372 posts
    Helper bee

    I’m a nurse of 8 years experience and I would strongly suggest you get some real life experience before trying to conceive, especially if you are also saving up to buy a house, if you can pay off a bit more on the house to start with then all your future mortgage repayments will be way more affordable. You don’t want to set yourself up for a difficult ride when having a child is so difficult already and if you do have some experience you can always pick up a casual shift here and there to keep up your registration/skills.

    Post # 13
    Member
    71 posts
    Worker bee

    NEW GRAD NURSE HERE!! i 100% recommend putting that baby fever on hold. I graduated in May, passed NCLEX in September, & started my first nursing job at the beginning of this year. SO & I have MAJOR baby fever, but I want to wait until I’ve been there a year before trying to get pregnant so that I can go PRN and make my own schedule & have a very small requirement of hours to work while I raise out kids. I want to keep my foot in the door, because if you leave nursing even for a little bit it’s REALLY HARD to get back in. 

     

    Also, being a new grad nurse is REALLY stressful. I got my DREAM job & I’m still crazy stressed out, worried all the time, constantly thinking about work. Also, I’m working nights (which you most likely will if you work hospital bedside). I cannot imagine taking care of a baby right now, I barely have the energy to care for myself. 

    Post # 14
    Member
    1169 posts
    Bumble bee

    I was an xray tech for 6 years. I had son#1 in 2005. I stayed home with him until he was 2 then returned to the workforce. I had son#2 in 2007. I tried to return to the workforce when he was 1 but unfortunately due to medical issues that he had, I was unable to do so. The best thing for me to do was stay home with the kids. I have thoroughly enjoyed being able to be there for my kids. I get to volunteer in their classes and go on field trips with them.

    The only negative thing I am finding is that no one wants to hire a tech that has been out of work for 6 years. I still have all my credentials up to date but why hire me, when they can hire the new students that are fresh out of school. I am considering going back to school to get a degree in ultrasound. It is what I wanted to originally do, when I went for diagonostic xray. The school made you go through the xray tech program first before you could specialize. Now of course things have changed. But my kids are older and more independent now and it would make it easier for me to go back to school.

    Post # 15
    Member
    1430 posts
    Bumble bee

    I have been a nurse for 7 years.  It is really competitive to get a newgrad RN position these days. We just had 2 openings on our unit for over 200 applicants. It should improve in the years to come as more baby boomers begin retiring but I really think finishing school and getting pregnant and leaving the workforce for 5 years is a bad idea and could make things difficult to get back the field. But I dont neccesarily think prolonging TTC if you are both ready and financial stable is the best answer either. 

    One other option.. Finish school, get some experience and once you get pregnant/have kids go from full time to a per diem position. Per diem requirements are very low, usually only work once a week, or several times a month so you could very much be a “stay at home mom” 6 days a week and only work one day so you aren’t ever really out of the job market. 

    The topic ‘Career Woman or Stay-At-Home-Mom’ is closed to new replies.

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