(Closed) Catholic+Christian, not a sacrament?

posted 6 years ago in Interfaith
Post # 3
Member
3773 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: December 1999

Hhhmmm, I guess I am confused too. As long as you have received your sacraments prior to marriage and you meet the churches requirments for pre cana, I would assume it will be considered a sacrament to you, but not your husband and would still be recognised by the church.

Post # 4
Member
1210 posts
Bumble bee

@Igem:  Its in Canon Law of the church that with a dispensation, a marriage with disparity of cult is considered valid, but non-sacramental. That said, if your Fiance was to be validly baptized (either before or after the marriage occurs) it will automatically convert to a sacrament.

For the Catholic Church to recognize a baptism, water must be poured and the words “I baptize you in the name of the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit” must be said. Maybe your Fiance belongs to a church that doesn’t validly baptize in the eyes of the Catholic church? If he wants to get baptized, maybe he could consider participating in RCIA classes?

I hope that is helpful. You can google information about the Catholic Church and Canon Law to get more information.

Post # 5
Member
3886 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

For your marriage to be a sacramental marriage in the eyes of the Catholic church, both you and your future husband have to be baptized Catholics.  You and your fiance have to talk about what is going to work best for you.  You could check into his church to see if they would consider the marriage sacramental (if they even do such a thing) if you were not baptized Anglican; or one of you convert to the other religion; or go with the non-sacramental marraige for now and decide in the future what religion each of you wants to practice.

Post # 6
Member
3697 posts
Sugar bee

@fishbone:  For your marriage to be a sacramental marriage in the eyes of the Catholic church, both you and your future husband have to be baptized Catholics.

Not quite: they both have to be baptized Christians, but they don’t both have to be Catholic.

Post # 7
Member
2 posts
Wannabee

@Igem:  I would first ask you catholic priest to explain this stuff to you, all priest should know about this. here are some things to ask the priest about and if you are confused by the terms then ask your priest about that also:

The union between a Catholic and a non-baptized spouse is not considered sacramental. However, Hater adds, “Though they do not participate in the grace of the sacrament of marriage, both partners benefit from God’s love and help [grace] through their good lives and beliefs.”  http://foryourmarriage.org/catholic-marriage/church-teachings/interfaith-marriages/

This is my understnading: The reason it is not a sacrament for you is because the sacrament of marriage is administered by you and your fiance. And inorder to receive the sanctifying grace from the sacrament both parties must be baptised (cleansed from original sin).  We all are able to receive actual grace but sacraments provide sanctifying grace (which

look here:

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/06689a.htm

Actual Grace
Explains the concept of actual grace, which is defined in the article as “a supernatural help of God for salutary acts granted in consideration of the merits of Christ.”

Sanctifying Grace
->makes one more holy or more saintly (my understanding

Post # 8
Member
556 posts
Busy bee

if there’s no communion during the ceremony it’s not a catholic wedding. it’s basically like getting married in any other christian church if there’s not communion (which you can do as long as you accept christ).

the communion part is what makes it legit catholic. since he’s not catholic they can’t give him communion and it wont be part of your wedding.

you’re still married–legally in the eyes of the law. just not catholic spiritually. you are christian spiritually though.

Post # 9
Member
1310 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: December 2011

@MrsTCB:  No no no! You defnitely do NOT have have communion at a Catholic wedding, for it to be official in the Catholic Church! Many many Catholic marriages take place outside of Mass!

No offense but where do people come up with this stuff??

Here’s how it works;

A Catholic marries a Catholic in the Catholic Church. Their marriage is a sacrament.

A Catholic marries a Non-Catholic who has been baptized using the Trinitarian formula (I baptize you in the name of the Father and of the Son) – this includes Lutherans, Episcopalians, most Protestants. If you have been baptized you probably fall in this category. This marriage would be a sacrament.

A Catholic marries a Non-Christian or anyone who has not been baptized using the Trinitarian formula. This includes Hindus, Buddhists, Muslims, a follower of Christ who has never been baptized, or a follower of Christ who has been baptized using an alternative, non-Trinitarian formula (LDS) or just ANYONE who has not been baptized. This marriage would not be a sacrament.

But all of these marriages are possible within the Catholic Church. Just because a marriage is non-sacramental, does not mean it is not RECOGNIZED by the Catholic Church. There is additional paperwork and permissions to be obtained.

Some of the above marriages could take place in a non-Catholic house of worship. That doesn’t affect whether they are sacramental or not. Additional permission would be required.

Post # 10
Member
873 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

@Magdalena:  A Catholic marries a Non-Catholic who has been baptized using the Trinitarian formula (I baptize you in the name of the Father and of the Son) – this includes Lutherans, Episcopalians, most Protestants. If you have been baptized you probably fall in this category. This marriage would be a sacrament.

– I do not believe this is always correct.  If the marriage is invalid, it is also not a sacrament.

Post # 11
Member
990 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

@MrsTCB:  Funny thing is my preist scoffed at this notion. Many CATHOLIC non interfaith couples are forgoing communion. A marriage is about the vows, which are different in the Catholic church (only slightly) from other churches.

@starrynight:  It is a sacrament if it is in the Church. So yes this could be correct but only if it is in a Catholic Church

For any Catholic Sacramental wedding to take place one must go before God which is the Church as far as location and priest as far as celebrant that though is prob more tradition that Tradition though don’t see it changing any time soon

Post # 12
Member
49 posts
Newbee

I honestly don’t know. I am baptized Christian and my Fiance was baptized Catholic (but he never did his conformation) so it doesn’t really matter to us lol I believe i have to sign a paper saying that I won’t keep my husband from taking our future kids to a Catholic church. I find it utterly ridiculous because I would never keep him from sharing something like that with our kids but whatever. It seems important to my Future Mother-In-Law that I sign this paper. Ugh she is annoying.

Post # 13
Member
1 posts
Wannabee
  • Wedding: February 2010

@magdalena is correct.

I am a baptised (trinitarian baptism as an infant) Protestant married to a baptized, practicing Catholic. We went through pre-cana and married in his very conservative Catholic church. We did not have communion during our ceremony, per the priest’s recommendation (highlights differences during a time that should be about unity.)

Taking communion or not during the ceremony has no bearing on the legitimacy of the marriage or legitimacy of the sacrament. It’s a nice thing to do, but it doesn’t have to be part of the ceremony.

In fact, our priest told us that many couples who are both baptized Catholics forgo the communion simply because it makes the ceremony too long, haha.

Our marriage is a legitimate, valid, recognized, CATHOLIC SACRAMENT. 🙂 If your fiance gets baptized in the trinitarian forumla, so will yours. Congratulations and good luck!

 

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