(Closed) Charting Bees: Where do you draw the line between “light” and “spotting?”

posted 7 years ago in TTC
Post # 3
Member
5572 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

I googled and found this 🙂

Realize that 1 tablespoon = 3 teaspoons, teaspoon = 5ml. A normal pad holds 5ml when full (1/3 – 1/2 of pad covered, blood seen clearly through the back). A super pad holds 10 ml. This is the same for tampons. Anything les than 5ml is too light and more than 80ml is too heavy. To amend the scale I went in and added measures by day for some of the levels.

The Mansfield-Voda-Jorgensen Menstrual Bleeding Scale can give you indication about how much you are bleeding:

1. Spotting. A drop or two of blood, not even requiring sanitary protection though you may prefer to use some. Use of a liner appropriate at this point. It will not be filled only marked.

2. Very light bleeding. You would need to change the least absorbent tampon or pad one or two times per day, though you may prefer to change more frequently.

3. Light bleeding. You would need to change a low or regular absorbency tampon or pad two or three times per day, though you may prefer to change more frequently. 15ml/day – 4 days of this is 60ml

4. Moderate bleeding. You would need to change a regular absorbency tampon or pad every three to four hours, though you may prefer to change more frequently. 4 pad changes =20ml/day 3days is again 60ml

5. Heavy bleeding. You would need to change a high absorbency tampon or pad every three to four hours, though you may prefer to change more frequently. 4 pad changes/day is 40ml and 2 days of this is 80ml

6. Very heavy bleeding or gushing. Protection hardly works at all; you would need to change the highest absorbency tampon or pad every hour or two. If this happens for longer than an 8 hour stretch you should call your DR.

Most with lighter to moderate, bleeds last longer; in general heavier are for shorter durations. 5ml will turn water in a toilet dark red and look like an incredibly massive amt. Many women have days that vary. If you change pads more frequently and they are not full you would double the number of pads to get the same amt of loss per day.

Your flow is a factor of the efficiency of uterine contractions – felt or not. The better you contract the sooner you expel the contents. Blood does not carry over month to month. Older/darker blood is the product of inefficient contrations causing blood to remain in the uterus hours after it is released from the lining and exposure to oxygen has occured. All blood is expelled before the lining regenerates. That is dictated by your hormones. This blood is actually more than blood; it is a mix of different cell types and vaginal/cervical/uterine secretions that can account for variations in texture, color and thickness (or thinness).
Edited to add most dosing cups that come with meds that have a 5ml mark for the smallest dose – this is for a visual reference for those that need to “see” the amt.

Post # 4
Member
2538 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: November 2009

@MrsCarnival:  It won’t matter for your chart.  It doesn’t use any bleeding to calculate anything, it’s just there for you to note and look for patterns.

I personally call spotting anything that doesn’t require a tampon.

Post # 5
Member
5892 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: October 2010

@Running Elley:  Who know there was a scale?! What is frustrating is that a few months ago I was between level 5-6 for several weeks. The docs were concerned, but not alarmed. I must have been losing 60+ml per day for weeks on end. But unless you go through a heavy pad every 1.5-2 hours, they just aren’t alarmed. 

Post # 6
Member
20 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: June 2011

 

@MrsCarnival: I’ve always wondered the same thing! I chart also and don’t know what to put sometimes.  I was having a hard time determining CD 1 until I started getting bad cramps which was always the start of AF.  I also have a hard time telling the end because of spotting.

 

@Running Elley:  this is great, thank you!

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