(Closed) Charting Good News and Bad News

posted 6 years ago in TTC
Post # 3
Hostess
8145 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2012

i have the exact same thing!  mine is CD31!  sigh… i am not actively TTC, but i would be interested in what other bees ahve to say  🙂

Post # 4
Member
5107 posts
Bee Keeper

@ExcitedScaredBee:  I say continue charting a few more cycles…things may get more clear and you may O more clearly and earlier in coming cycles. Yay for thermal shift! Also, you have dotted CHs, so that means FF is not sure of your O date, looking at your chart it could have been as early as CD23. That’s pretty typical for someone with a longer cycle.

Post # 5
Member
2226 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: January 2012

Are you in a hurry? Clomid would help you ovulate earlier but it can affect the quality of your CM, making it harder for sperm to survive… Essencially, it’s a double edged sword. I also read in The Impatient Woman’s Guide to Getting Pregnant that all those statistics are a little off. A young healthy couple with well-timed intercourse have up to a 60% chance of getting pregnant on any given cycle.

I would suggest keeping track of your CM to help you pinpoint your most fertile days and capitalizing on them. The choice is ultimately yours though; especially if there IS a hurry!

 

Post # 6
Member
1527 posts
Bumble bee

Is this your first cycle off of birth control or just charting? If you just stopped taking birth control, that could easily be why you O later in the month. Regardless, keep charting. 

DO NOT take clomid just to “speed things up” because you are impatient. Most doctors will not let you use clomid for more than six cycles in your LIFE, so it is really best to wait until you’ve been trying for a few cycles to see if you need it. You could easily get pregnant next cycle and then you’d have saved time, money, and wouldn’t risk all of the side-effects. There are a ton of negative things that can make your fertility go down by using clomid if it’s not really needed. I’m sorry that your cycles are longer, but they could always shorten over time (especially if you’ve recently been using birth control). It’s generally used in people who don’t ovulate at all, and there is a risk of multiple eggs being released (as it stimulates your ovaries to produce follicles). http://www.drugs.com/pro/clomid.html There’s a lot about clomid there.

I’m very unless you need a drug, don’t take a drug. And if you do take it MAKE SURE you are being closely monitored with blood work and ultrasounds, because you can also grow cysts on your ovaries. It can be really helpful to women with fertility issues (specifically ovulating issues) but I don’t think having longer cycles qualifies as a fertility issue because you are ovulating on your own. It’s frustrating when you want to try as often as possible, but I don’t think it’s worth risking taking clomid quite yet until you’ve been trying for awhile. There are women on these boards who have gotten pregnant on cycles of around or over 100 days (ovulating on cycle day 80 or 90 something) without fertility drugs, so it’s very possible to get pregnant without fertility medication with longer cycles.

Post # 8
Member
753 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

I ovulated on CD 24 and got pregnant. Prior to that I had been off birth control about 9 months and only ovulated twice, one time being on CD 43 and I was still hesitant to try clomid. I was going to wait another 6 months or so before going that route, but fortunately I didn’t have to. I think it’s great that you’re ovulating on your own and CD 26 really isn’t that bad! Best of luck!

Post # 9
Member
5107 posts
Bee Keeper

@MrsRugbee:  May I ask where you have heard the 60% statistic? Most studies I have heard are more like 20% with perfect intercourse.

Post # 12
Member
818 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2013

@ExcitedScaredBee:  Has your Dr run any tests to see if there is a medical reason why your cycles are so long? Just curious, I would also continue to chart til April then take the next step, be that what ever your Dr suggests.

Post # 13
Member
1527 posts
Bumble bee

@ExcitedScaredBee:  There are a lot of natural supplements I would try before clomid to help regulate cycles. http://www.livestrong.com/article/94972-natural-regulate-menstrual-cycle/ There’s a list there. I would only use clomid if you’re prepared for multiples if they already run in your family. Maybe try a naturopath? A lot of girls have had good results with them. 

@MrsRugbee:  Having read that book, it’s not true. Here’s a pretty accurate study:

In one study, the pregnancy rates of couples who timed intercourse with ovulation were faster than typically seen among couples trying to conceive:

  • 38 percent were pregnant after one cycle
  • 68 percent were pregnant after three cycles
  • 81 percent were pregnant after six cycles
  • 92 percent were pregnant after 12 cycles

Even if the sperm reaches the egg and fertilization occurs, there is only a 66% chance that the egg will implant (which I think is what you’re thinking of). Watch “The Great Sperm Race” if you want a really good explanation of why the egg doesn’t get fertilized every cycle. Only about 20 or so (maybe) sperm reach the fallopian tubes, and then it’s a timing game. If there was a 67-76% chance of getting pregnant each month with perfectly timed intercourse, I would be knocked up at least twice by now. 

Post # 15
Member
5107 posts
Bee Keeper

@MrsRugbee:  Yeah, what I’ve read has been much more consistent with @glittermoon:‘s stats… I know that in that book she says that those studies are wrong, but they can’t be, there are just too many of them, and far too many factors that can go wrong in each cycle. They are much lower, and that’s coming from my RE and many studies he’s done. The chance of pregnancy with IVF aren’t even that high, I think it’s like a 58% chance of pregnancy in perfectly healthy couples doing IVF.

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