Chemical Free Makeup

posted 6 months ago in Wellness
Post # 31
Member
311 posts
Helper bee

AB Bride :  And I am an environmental  geochemist. In geochemistry, we don’t view natural elements as chemicals. You can say that NaCl is a chemical compound while C6H12O6 is an organic compound but geologically, NaCl is called halite. We call them naturally occuring compounds. Fe2O3 is hematite. Fe3O4 is magnetite. As we study the properties of these minerals and rocks, we look at them differently. Even though we learn about them as chemicals in school and  Intro to Chemistry when geologists take more mineralogy, petrology and other classes, we get more indepth with these minerals and rocks and start seeing them differently. We dont think of H2O as a chemical. We know that Hydrogen atoms combine with O atom to form water, of course. The basic concept is that water is a colourless chemical substance formed by two hydrogen atoms bonded to an oxygen atom. The mentality later changes or the basic is perhaps thrown out of the window as we learn new infromation especially when we use “naturally ocurring” vs “anthrogenic” etc

I woudn’t want to thnk of halite or sylvite as a chemical when I lick them for identification purposes in the field. By The Way, I am developing a geochemistry course for a university, and it looks like I will have to bring our conversation as a review for the students. 

Post # 32
Member
2906 posts
Sugar bee

As can be seen from the answers, geology and chemistry are so much more fun than makeup and skin products.

As we know from history, yesterday’s good products are today’s bad products, and today’s good products are probably going to be tomorrow’s carcinogens.

My advice would be just to use half as much makeup and skin products as usual. This will give you half the amount of chemicals, harmful or otherwise.

I’d make an exception for suncream. It prevents wrinkles forming in the first place and so when you’re older, like me, you won’t need any chemical-infested anti-ageing products.

Post # 33
Member
791 posts
Busy bee

AB Bride :   odaile1 :  I think we can all agree that OP made herself clear when she specified what type of chemicals she was looking to avoid. I do not use makeup so I cannot give first hand experience, but second checking out Whole Foods.

I realise that geologists may use slightly different terminology to describe compounds, minerals, and elements. However, as the last post pointed out NaCl is a chemical compound although it can also be called halite. However, those terms are not mutually exclusive. I do believe that chemicals are getting a bad reputation because peolple generally use the term in a negative way, but that does not mean that other compounds or elements that we use on a daily basis are not chemicals. Water is definitely considered a chemical, but the idea that chemicals are bad, makes some people prefer to look at it as water. I think the discussion could be useful for your class, but I think saying water is not a chemical is incorrect, misleading, and gives chemicals a bad reputation. Minerals are definitely chemicals too.

Post # 34
Member
2372 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: December 2017 - Courthouse

piper628 :  I don’t wear a lot of makeup but I love Pacifica products for makeup, skincare, bath products, etc. I wore their shades of pink pallette for my wedding 🙂 

It’s a lot more expensive but Beauty Counter is great for safe skin care and makeup. 

Also, I don’t know if this counts, but I love Burt’s Bees. Their lipstick crayons are some of my favorites of all time. They’re not as drying as lipsticks.

Post # 35
Member
94 posts
Worker bee

I admit I used to be a member of the Semantics Police, but quit when I realized that IT DOES NOTHING BUT DISTRACT FROM THE POINT.

Post # 36
Member
843 posts
Busy bee

piper628 :  what are the hair products you’re using? 

I use tarte, milk, and too faced usually. 

Post # 37
Member
2906 posts
Sugar bee

norapunch :  Sometimes semantics matter – especially when it comes to an unscrupulous advertising industry which is not above throwing around words like “pure”, “healthy”, “natural”, “organic”, and “chemicals” in a very dishonest way in order to gain sales. 

By the way, “89 out of 113 women” said they preferred plastering cheesecake on their faces to makeup because it was made with pure, healthy, organic, natural dihydrogen oxide (spring water) and there were fewer chemicals in it (I made up this statistic – but hey it’s so tempting) and, of course, it’s 30% better (than what, I hear you ask).  🙂

 

Post # 39
Member
94 posts
Worker bee

Supersleuth :  I’m with you on the subject of the dishonesty of the advertizing industry and look forward to the day we can take it down with cheesecake and the truth :). But for the time being I think we may be stuck with doing our own research and patronizing brands we trust. Or, *gasp* choosing not to wear makeup at all!   

piper628 : In terms of this discussion, it’s true, you should watch out for arbitrary terms like “natural”, “chemical free”, “healthy” and “pure”. These really do mean nothing. Certifications such as vegan, kosher, organic, cruelty free, etc., however do imply that certain standards were adhered to during manufacturing when they are stamped on product labels (you can look up exactly what they mean online—it’s not always what you think). It’s confusing at times, and it’s up to you to decide what certifications you care about, but it pays off to investigate. 

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