(Closed) childhood vaccination schedule?

posted 8 years ago in Babies
Post # 3
Member
2829 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2011

are you sure the doc wasn’t referring to flu vaccs being “bad?“ (there are only vaccs made for what is projected to be the most virulent strain each year so the flu shot is not overly effective though it does add some* protection).

 

I think our vaccs schedule was 3months, 6 months 12 months 18 months and 4 years. I would have to dig out the vacs record to tell you which ones when specifically.

We did not do a delayed schedule.

Post # 4
Member
2767 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2009

You should definitely vaccinate your children on time.  EVERYONE SHOULD.  This is coming from an immunologist.  The people who don’t vaccinate are messing up the herd immunity.

Also, I’ve never heard of any doctors telling their patients that vaccines are bad.  What kind of doctors are those?  The only reason a doctor would ever say that is if the person had an allergy to something in the vaccine or something else along those lines…

Post # 5
Member
2161 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

I followed Dr. Sears schedule the best I could.  (I’m in Canada)  His book was a great read, he didn’t push you one way or another about any of the vaccines.

Post # 7
Member
7081 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2009

Traditional US schedule here…

Post # 8
Member
1944 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2009

We will follow the traditional schedule when the time comes. Worked in pediatrics as a nurse and saw many different schedules for vaccines and as long as you keep up on with what you need to get each time that is fine. Personally for me, I want my child to stay on schedule bc sometimes with delayed schedules, there are many children that do get behind. Making them up at a later age is more traumatic bc now they will remember it and it was quite difficult sometimes.

Post # 9
Member
311 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2008

I have to meet with a pediatrician first, but our current plan is to do most shots on schedule, but delay Hep B (this isn’t really an infancy disease) and delay chicken pox. 

Post # 10
Member
536 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2007

Definitely traditional schedule here.

Post # 11
Member
13096 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2010

Me and all of my siblings were vaccinated on the traditional schedule and I intend to do the same when I have kids.

Vaccinations and herd immunity are sooo important and I’m not willing to take any chances with my child’s health.

Post # 12
Member
2313 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2011

Definitely vaccinate. Many daycares and public schools will not accept children who have not been vaccinated unless you can prove it was for religious reasons, and you will end up having to get your child vaccinated before enrolling them in school anyway. I can only imagine your doctor was against the FLU vaccine because I’ve never heard of a pediatrician being against vaccines in general. They are FOR your child’s health and do not lead to autism or anything else the great doctor Jenny McCarthy claimed. I’d recommend vaccinating your child on the traditional schedule; this is what we do for our daughter.

Post # 13
Member
6009 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: May 2009

We’re on the traditional US schedule, but we make two to three vists during the week of Addie’s vaccinations so she doesn’t get all of her shots at the same time; she gets all of the vaccines within a couple days of each other, but we limit it to two vaccines each visit.  I have co-workers who’ve used Dr. Sears’ alternate vaccination schedule and they’re pretty happy with it.

It’s so weird that your husband’s doctor was against vaccines?  Everything I’ve heard indicates that it’s super important for new parents (and any care-givers of newborns) to be current on the DTaP vaccine; our hospital even offerred both of us the booster before we left right after birth.  Our doctor said many of the new pertusssis cases cropping up are a result of adults not being current on their DTaP boosters, and then transferring their sickness to newborns, who haven’t had a chance to be vaccinated yet.  Pretty scary stuff.  We both got DTaP boosters when Addie was born, and we had our nanny get a booster, as well, when she started working for us.

Post # 14
Member
22 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: July 2012

My son just turned 18 months old three days ago and he doesn’t have a single vaccine. I have done extensive research and made an educated decision. I am VERY happy with my decision and wouldn’t change a thing.

Post # 15
Member
2767 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2009

@bri.dear – who is educating you to help you make your decision?  I don’t think you will feel very good when you son gets sick.

Post # 16
Member
536 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2007

That is nuts that his doctor was discouraging vaccines.

Surprise (as a reaction), I’d understand more- if you’re a male adult under the age of 65 who doesn’t work in health care, you generally don’t need any vaccines (besides the yearly flu vaccine) (and unless you are spending time with an infant, as in this case), so presumably their office doesn’t do a lot of vaccinating of healthy young people. But I can’t believe they’d actually encourage him not to get them!

Your post made me curious about adult vaccination schedules, so I found this linked to on the CDC website if anyone is interested: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4030.pdf 

I didn’t realize that I should get a tdap vaccine- now I’m going to ask about it at my next OB visit, so thank you for that!

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