Cleaning Home – Coronavirus

posted 3 months ago in Home
Post # 2
Member
1551 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2020

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Post # 3
Member
64 posts
Worker bee

I just googled it and yes, washing surfaces with soap and water will disinfect as long as you scrub them. 
rubbing alcohol, hydrogen peroxide and bleach will also do the trick. 

Post # 5
Member
123 posts
Blushing bee

 Remember that this is a novel coronavirus, so cleaning products advertising ability to kill it will not be able to kill this particular case AFAIK. 

Post # 6
Member
9808 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2013

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zstbee84 :  

I have a force of nature which in theory should most likely kill coronavirus as it kills norovirus and others similar to covid-19 (I believe area might need to be wet for 10 minutes though to work, most things with have a contact time in order to kill the virus).  It is an EPA registred disinfectent and santizer.  It is just a system to make hypochlorous acid in your home.  It lasts about 2 weeks before it breaks down.  It seems like they are in stock.  Personally I bought mine originally because I can use it on fabrics, furniture, etc and it’s perfectly safe to use around babies/kids without having to worry about them touching something you are trying to clean.  https://www.forceofnatureclean.com/lp-cleaning-disinfecting-test-results/

Bleach solution would work if you can get bleach but it would need to be made fresh often (daily).

I do have wipes, lysol, and other cleaning products now but it’s an option if you are looking for something in stock right now that is more more than dish soap

Post # 7
Member
426 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2019

If you’re not leaving the house and not having visitors, you probably don’t need to clean as much. I don’t understand the hysteria around cleaning products. I’m just going to clean with vinegar like I always do. Where needed (door knobs and delivery packages) we’ll use gloves and disinfect with some cheap tequila. My husband and I are quarantining and don’t plan to have any visitors so I don’t think there’s a high risk of the virus entering our house. 

Post # 8
Member
13054 posts
Honey Beekeeper

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revonue :  AFAIK, that is incorrect. The products have not been specifically or extensively tested on this strain, but they kill similar or even hardier pathogens and are likely and presumed to do so here. 

Post # 10
Member
15020 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

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lucyinsky :  this exactly.  I don’t  understand the cleaning supply craze and why I would have to clean my house any differently or more than usual.   My shoes stay at the door,  I wash my hands upon entering and change into house clothes.  Additionally, I’m washing my hands before leaving anywhere and getting into my car now too.  And for me, I enter through my garage which no one uses by myself and my husband who is a bigger germaphobe than me.  Nothing should be any different virus, corona or otherwise, in my house.  

Post # 12
Member
15020 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

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zstbee84 :  Lol uh oh.  never mind regularly, I’ve never once cleaned a light switch or door knob, cabinet pull, etc.   Its just never occurred to me.  Should I be??   One of us is sick  once every 2, maybe 3 years and we manage not to spread it (except between my son and me cause we share food), so I guess it’s ok.  I don’t really disinfect other than in the bathroom and kitchen counter where I cut raw meat. 

Post # 13
Member
1681 posts
Bumble bee

Remember to keep perspective.  Are people going nuts using harsh chemicals on their moppable floors and then walking around on the carpet they only vacuumed?  Using bleach all over the bathroom and then lying down on the bedspread that hasn’t been washed in weeks because it’s bulky?  Some things to remember… For most germs frequent thorough cleaning with soap and warm/hot water will remove the germs even if it doesn’t directly kill them.  The virus seems to have a three day shelf life based on CDC research with this particular strain.  If you are self isolating, cleaning is the best approach for most areas.  If going out, take off your shoes before going in.  Change your clothes and put them in the wash immediately upon entering the house and take a thorough shower, washing your hair and scrubbing your nails with a nail brush.  Do not eat from any container,or worse fresh produce, that has come from a store sooner than four days ago unless you can wash the container or item under hot water with lots of soap.  Letting it sit in an isolated area for four days to let the virus for on its own is best, then wash everything that can be washed as an extra measure.

Keep your purse, coat, sweater in an isolated place and don’t touch them more than necessary. If getting into your purse to use your wallet etc wash all surfaces your wallet touched and scrub your hands with soap and warm water using a nail brush.  I bought nail brushed when I heard about what was happening in Wuhan, not toilet paper.

Those basic habits can take care of most risk.  Carry wipes while out to wipe down screens before you touch them if you can, like the little screen at the gas pump.  Or say to heck with it and scrub up when you get home.  Just don’t rub your eyes  or your mouth or nose.  Decontaminate upon entry to the house each day if you’ve gone out.  I did this when working in an animal rescue shelter and in a vet clinic to keep my pets safe.  It’s doable even without a pandemic.

But I realized the importance of consistent caution because at a young age, I watched helplessly when a puppy was delivered to us from a breeder already infected with parvo, coincidentally an older Corona virus.  He died.  It was awful.  I’ve treated every animal I worked with as if it was infected and contagious ever since.  And now I’m doing it with people.  I’ve handled some very sick animals in my day and never had anything spread.  Off with the clothes and shower EVERY TIME is the best approach we can take.  And shoes off at the door.

Post # 14
Member
517 posts
Busy bee

What about steeming? Has anyone looked into it?

Post # 15
Member
1681 posts
Bumble bee

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theweddingunplanner :  

I’ve been searching for the critical heat tolerance of this virus and I have yet to find anything concrete.  But very few microbials can survive boiling temperatures.  I got a steam mop for practical purposes pre-pandemic and am looking forward to using it.  Just be careful.  Many surfaces don’t hold up well to extreme temperatures.  In fact, “steam cleaning” carpeting usually just involves heated water, but not full-on steam.  Cheap carpeting might not hold up well.

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