(Closed) Co-Sleeping

posted 6 years ago in Babies
Post # 3
Member
9669 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2012

Oh, I remember those precious, sweet days of sleeping with my little baby.  Actually, he was in a cradle next to my bed so I could Boyfriend or Best Friend on demand and I did my best to stay awake, I was so paranoid to squash him.  I held him in a recliner and let him sleep on my chest a lot.  Darling Husband (ex-now but H at the time) joked that he would think I was his bed because of that.  I moved him to his crib eventually but not until he was about six months old.  My pediatrician gave me some wonderful advice as to how to make the transition, and it was harder on me than it was on the baby, haha!  All babies are different, some like to snuggle and cuddle and some prefer to be left alone while sleeping.  Trust yourself that you’ll figure out what works best for you and your little bundle of joy.  Also, there are lots of great books on the subject, I really liked Penelope Leach back in those days, she wrote some good stuff.

Post # 4
Member
2190 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2011

I co-slept with DS–it was the only way he would sleep for 4-5 hours straight for the first 6 months. We had him sleep in his crib during naps at around 5 months which was a slow transition but by 7 months he would fall asleep in his crib for bedtime, then would wake up by 1am and sleep with me until 7am. I held onto him all night but I never fully slept either. I would wake up every 30 minutes to make sure he was okay. It wasn’t easy. With Dirty Delete we plan to have her sleep in her bassinet next to our bed for the first few months but I won’t co-sleep this time. It was too hard in the long run and felt almost impossible to get him to transition fully to his crib (it wasn’t until he was a year that he actually slept in his bed all night).

Post # 5
Member
6009 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: May 2009

I’ve co-slept with both my babies; we moved Addie to her own bed around 11 months, and we plan on having Henri sleep with us until around a year, as well.  Here’s some of the basics of safe co-sleeping (I’d also recommend researching it a bit more so you can be sure to do it safely every time):

    1. First of all, there’s a few different techniques of co-sleeping; sometimes people use specific names, sometimes all of these forms are referred to as “co-sleeping”: room sharing is simply sharing a room with the baby; bed sharing means sharing a bed with the baby; side-carring means attaching the crib/co-sleeper/bassinet to the bed so one side is shared between the baby’s bed and parents’ bed.  We bed-share, for reference, so that’s where my advice is coming from.

     

      1. The most important thing you can do to ensure a safe co-sleeping is to prepare your environment.  The bed should be firm and free of all soft materials; keep pillows/blankets/comforters/etc… far away from the area the baby is sleeping in.  There are different ways to block off the side of the bed so baby doesn’t roll out, but the safest are mesh bed rails or co-sleepers with mesh sides.  The mattress should also fit firmly into the bed frame, without any gaps between the mattress and wall or headboard (this is very important as entrapment/suffocation is the number one way babies are killed while bedsharing).

       

        1. Prepare yourselves for safe co-sleeping.  Generally, mothers (especially breastfeeding mothers) can safely co-sleep as they synch their sleep cycles with their baby’s cycles, meaning you’ll wake and sleep at the same times.  Fathers are not as in tune with baby’s cycles, so baby should not sleep next to him.  Instead, place the baby between the mother and the side of the bed, with one of the aforementioned barriers to keep the baby from falling out.  Never co-sleep while intoxicated or if very tired/medicated/etc…  Never co-sleep on a soft surface like a couch or recliner.  Never allow pets or older children to co-sleep with the infant.

        Personally, we didn’t have an issue with moving Dirty Delete to her own bed at 11 months.  She started napping in her crib at 3 months, and from early on, I’d put her to sleep in her crib at the beginning of the night and just move her into our bed when we went to sleep a couple hours later.  We’ll see how Henri does, but I really think this is more of a case by case basis, since some kids don’t adjust to changes as easily as others.

        Finally, here’s some links to get you started on safe co-sleeping.  Dr. Sears and Dr. James McKenna are pretty well-known experts in co-sleeping, and both have written sleep books; if you Google either of their names, a lot of great info will come up:

        http://cosleeping.nd.edu/safe-co-sleeping-guidelines/

        http://www.askdrsears.com/topics/sleep-problems/sleep-safety/safe-co-sleeping-habits

        http://babyparenting.about.com/od/sleeping/a/cosleep.htm

        Post # 6
        Member
        9669 posts
        Buzzing Beekeeper
        • Wedding: September 2012

        @Mrs. Spring:  Not meaning to threadjack, but may I say how much I *love* your children’s names!

        Post # 7
        Member
        6009 posts
        Bee Keeper
        • Wedding: May 2009

        @Sunfire:  Lol, thanks!  My husband has good taste.  🙂

        Post # 9
        Member
        6009 posts
        Bee Keeper
        • Wedding: May 2009

        @AvantLaLettre:  I hope your daughter starts to sleep better soon!

        Post # 10
        Member
        873 posts
        Busy bee
        • Wedding: April 2013

        Are you swaddling her? If not, that may be all she needs.

        Post # 12
        Member
        7779 posts
        Bumble Beekeeper

        Charlotte is 11 days old and I’m not going to lie, there have been a few nights already that she has slept on me. I swore we wouldn’t co-sleep too and it scares the stuffing out of me.I’m so paranoid.

        Do you guys have a swing or a bouncer? She loves both of hers. In the swing, we tuck her in and turn on the swing motion. In the bouncer, we turn on the vibration. She will sleep really well in both of them. The only way she will sleep flat is if she’s on one of us or if she is tightly swaddled.

        Good luck.

        Post # 13
        Member
        336 posts
        Helper bee
        • Wedding: October 2014

        We co sleep and room share with Eira (15 weeks). Most nights she will happily stay in her cot but lately the nights are getting a lot colder (southern hemisphere) so I usually bring her into bed with us if she wakes up cold just to warm her up quickly. I know people say it encourages bad habits etc but I think co sleeping is an important bonding stage. Though I REALLY miss when she was so small she could just curl up on my chest and sleep all night.
        I was a very heavy sleeper but now she just has to make the slightest noise/movement and I wake up so safety wise I’m not concerned. My Mother-In-Law goes absolutely spare whenever the topic of co-sleeping comes up and end up shouting “YOU’LL END UP WITH A DEAD BABY.” every time regardless of whatever research I show her. 40% of parent in Japan co sleep with their children and they have the lowest levels of SIDS/cot death of any other country. The Japanese tend to have a lot less clutter in their beds (extra pillows, soft mattresses etc) and mothers are more likely to be stay at home so not as tired. BUT at the same time, you do eventually want them to be able to sleep in their own beds, Eira tends to sleep with her arms straight out so takes up the same space as another adult in the bed really! 

        http://www.thesleepstore.co.nz/sleep-information has some good information about encouraging solo sleep etc, we’re currently trying to teach her to self settle…hmm

        The topic ‘Co-Sleeping’ is closed to new replies.

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