College Admissions Scam

posted 5 months ago in The Lounge
Post # 2
Member
1217 posts
Bumble bee

I’m not from the US, and not condoning this at all, but as an outsider the US college entry system has always seemed corrupt in favour of wealthy families with connections to me, so I’m surprised that so many people are shocked by this? (I understand in this case SAT scores were changed and the university wasn’t aware, so that means it’s illegal). But, I don’t really see how that is morally any different to kids with lower grades being accepted because their parents make large donations, or were alumni themselves, the whole sports thing seems off to me too, letting kids onto courses with grades below standard because they’d be good on the college football team. I think the whole thing needs an overhaul tbh. 

Post # 3
Member
988 posts
Busy bee

I have not read to much about it, but I think you are correct. I also don’t see an issue with the wealthy paying more than their share to cover students that are on scholarships. ariesscientist :  

Post # 4
Member
4397 posts
Honey bee

Well I do find it unfortunate. I can’t say I’m necessarily heartbroken nor am I shocked because this isn’t new information. This one story is as big as it is because famous names are attached and got busted all at once.  But this s*** has been going on for as long as schools have existed. Whether it’s outright cheating and bribery, or it’s the manipulating of a mental impairment such as ADHD to get private testing, or nepotism and name recognition, or it’s the greasing of the wheels by having a friend who has a friend, or bribery disguised as charitable donations (ahem Harvard getting 2.5 million dollars richer after letting in little Jared Kushner).  The elite have wielded their power capitalizing on their names and fortunes to buy their way in at top schools for years.  The only difference is a guy who wanted in on the scam and formalized it into an enterprise got caught and ratted everyone in exchange for a deal.  But he’s not the only one.  Just the only one that got caught this time.

Post # 5
Member
713 posts
Busy bee

Thankfully, I’d long since disabused myself of the notion that the US is a meritocracy. But yeah, this sucks. 

Once again highlights how entitled the wealthy are, and how some will even resort to crime, despite all their kids legal advantages over poor kids raised in blue collar households. As the PP said, even some of the legal ways kids get into elite colleges strike me as unethical. When you consider the kinds of fancy sports that get people into elite colleges, it’s clear that these sports are not affordable to middle class kids. 

Post # 6
Member
2697 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

From my limited knowledge of the American uni system, which has been mostly gained from films and TV, I thought it was already the case that the rich paid their way into uni. 

Post # 8
Member
641 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2018

I’m surprised they were actually charged. I could immediately tell who got into my program through money or merit, and not just because they roll up in cars that cost as much as my house. I did also notice that they didn’t always take someone more deserving’s spot, sometimes the school created a spot just for them. It’s not fair and it’s not right but that’s life. You can claw and fight your way up and never get a fraction of what they do but focusing on them and unfairness just takes away from what you have accomplished and from your happiness.

Post # 9
Member
9342 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

I agree it’s not new, but at least in the cases of parents making large donations, that money benefited the whole school and not just one particular student. 

I wish I could be a fly on the wall when they kick out Lori Loughlin’s entitled brat of a daughter.

Post # 10
Member
7462 posts
Busy Beekeeper

Windborn :  the scam doesn’t surprise me one bit. My university actually had a separate college for people to buy their way in and if they did well there got filtered into the regular school lol. I AM pleasantly surprised that something is finally being done about it though! 

Post # 11
Member
1564 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2019 - City, State

What I don’t understand is that these people are rich…why couldn’t their parents just make a very generous donation instead of fudging the test scores. That’s the generally “acceptable” way to buy into a school – without fucking your kids over. No college is going to accept those kids now since their scores were tampered with. Not that these particular kids seem to care, but imagine if the kids didn’t know their parents hired people to “fix” their SAT/ACT scores, and are just now finding out? Like wow thanks for the display of faith mom!

But no, I’m not surprised. I went to a private college in the southern US; it was no secret that to get in you had to be either very smart or very rich, and it was glaringly obvious who was who. We were lucky in that once you got in the preferred treatment stopped, which can’t be said for a lot of colleges.

The US system is capitalist through and through – if you have money the rules don’t apply. Sad but true.

Post # 12
Member
9342 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

chelbell23 :  In the case of the fake scores, I don’t think most of the kids actually knew about it. If you read the transcripts of the phone conversations, many of the parents talk about hiding it from their kids and making sure they don’t find out. Honestly I’m a little sad for some of those kids, having to read what their parents really think of them.

In the case of the fake athletic scholarships, the kids had to know something was up. I mean you don’t get on the USC rowing team without having rowed a day in your life.

Post # 13
Member
2231 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

Twizbe :  This has always been somewhat true…the idea being, a donation is promised or hinted at, and the admissions office will find some alternate way to admit the student besides grades or test scores (say, the student plays some kind of obscure sport, or has some sort of interest or hobby that is expected to “flourish” while at that particular university). While this is not truly fair, the fact is, that donated money can go towards scholarships or school improvements that benefit all students, so I don’t have a huge problem with it (I say this as someone who could never have afforded the tuition but also didn’t have the grades or test scores for these elite schools, so I understand I had no horse in this race).

 

In this case, however, documents were completely falsified, pictures photoshopped, and the recipient of the “donation” was not the school itself, it was the person who arranged the application. Therefore, on top of the student who bought his or her way in taking a spot from a merit based candidate, there isn’t even any residual benefit to the school that could find its way to other students.

 

I wouldn’t call it heartbreaking, exactly, but kind of frustrating that these snowflakes have already been offered every possible leg up, and their parents are still cheating.

Post # 14
Member
5226 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: October 2017

Westwood :  I only learned about her when this news broke. People were disgusted with her vlog long before this news broke, now it’s just horrendous!

I’m obviously tainted by the news, but from what I see, she was getting heat before this broke because she said she didn’t care about school and was there to party. I’m surprised she hasn’t taken the videos down, but they are sponsored 

Post # 15
Member
2231 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

chelbell23 :  What I don’t understand is that these people are rich…why couldn’t their parents just make a very generous donation instead of fudging the test scores. 

 

I don’t know about the specific cases involving the fudged test scores, but in the case of USC, millionaire/celebrity parents are probably a dime a dozen and maybe a donation wouldn’t much level the playing field.

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