(Closed) complaining about a woman's dress code (at work)

posted 6 years ago in Career
Post # 3
Member
2233 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

I wouldn’t do it. If everyone talks about already I’m sure that HR knows about it then.

How would you feel if a coworker did the same thing to you?

I used to work in a place where people told on each other to HR all the time (never me though) and it was ridiculous. Created a really bad atmosphere.

Post # 4
Member
545 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: December 2012

I disagree with PP. If the clothes are inappropraite, then maybe the person doesn’t understand what is or is not appropraite. It can be distracting at work. There are a few here at my work that take “business casual” a little too far on the casual so I can somewhat relate. 

I know a few years ago our HR dept put out a mass email/document that just explained what was/was not “business casual” but did not point an individual out. I think this would be a great route for your HR dept to go

Post # 5
Member
5296 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: January 1993

is there actually a dress code that she is breaking?

Idk, I probably wouldn’t say anything either. For noise or smell(burnt popcorn that I’m smelling right now!) issues I would, because that is distracting while you’re at your desk. But if it’s just something where you occasionally see her around the office….meh. 

Post # 8
Member
3624 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

@hisgoosiegirl:  I agree. I don’t think it’s fair to complain about someone because they don’t buy the right sized clothes. If she’s breaking an actual dress code (too short of skirts, too much cleavage, etc) then I can understand. If you just don’t like the way she dresses then I think I’d keep my mouth shut.

Post # 9
Member
544 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

We call that section of girls the “nightclub” at our company…they all work in accounts payable and they keep the lights low in that area so the nickname is fitting. 

Post # 10
Member
2233 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

How mini are walking about here? And dresses? Unless she’s wearing club wear to work then I don’t really understand.

Post # 11
Member
3886 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

 

If it’s distracting you from your work then the best solution is to ignore it. Stop feeding the office gossip, and chill out and do your work. There will always be someone who wears too much perfume, or has no sense of style, or dresses like a hootchie-mama. You can either dwell on it, or move along and learn how to be productive no matter what your environment is like. The only exception to that would be if the employee is customer-facing in which case a manager or HR person should determine if her attire is giving the customer the wrong impression of the company.

We really can’t go running to HR every time someone wears, says or does something we don’t like. Not every case is a legitimate hostile workplace offense, and as professionals, we need to learn how to solve our tiny problems ourselves.  The alternative is a workplace with very strict dress codes and behavior rules that can quickly become suffocating.

Post # 14
Member
735 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

It’s really the job of this girl’s direct supervisor to deal with her compliance (or not) with office policies, including the dress code.  If her manager is a man, he may delegate this task to a female or HR emplyee.  (I’ve seen that happen at large corporations.)

It’s never really a coworker’s position to call out someone at your own level for a dresscode violation -safety, yes. Ethics? Absolutely.  dresscode? nope.  If she is in a position where she is “the face of the company” then her manager should deal with it.  but if she’s a cube dweller who answers a phone and email? Well… nobody will take her serioiusly, she’s not goig to get promoted looking like that.

At my last job people would run to HR to cause drama.  People would make things up about coworkers they didn’t like or felt threatened by.  HR was a joke.  If I had contacted HR to tell them that another was consistently dressing in a manner that I thought was inappropriate, it would look like I was jumping into the fray; trying to make other people look bad so I could get ahead.

If you really think this girl has no idea about what’s appropriate, perhaps you could talk to HER?  “Hey, I like [item of clothing that is approaching office attire].  But aren’t those shoes KILLING you?”  [no not really, I like to look HAWT] “Hmm, I save my sky-high heels for going out.  I think most people around here try to go for a slightly more conservative look at the office.  I feel like some of the more traditional people take me more seriously when I dress more like them.”

Post # 15
Member
2233 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

@vmec:  Hey, if it’s past her fingers like on the model, I don’t see the problem. It’s just a bit out there. Also the patent leather blue open toe heels are fine IMO. A little crazy? Yes. The place I worked at was VERY conservative when it came to dress code and the only rule for shoes was no flip flops in the office.

Post # 16
Member
1719 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

I’m just curious…what type of office do you work in? 

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