(Closed) Complex wants to do testing to our dog?! NEED ADVICE

posted 7 years ago in Pets
Post # 62
Member
7982 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2010

Do you have a friend who has a dog that is not one of those breeds?  Swab that dogs mouth and send it in.  Present that to the apartment manager.

Post # 64
Member
1398 posts
Bumble bee

I did a wisdom panel (off of ebay) and mine came back 50% beagle, 25% lab, 25% unknown.  The next 5 best breed matches were kerry blue terrier (20.57%), english springer spaniel (9.83%), german pinscher (8.43%), chow chow (5.64%), and mini poodle (3.64%).  Just an idea of accuracy.  

 

Post # 65
Member
2515 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: December 2011

for reference, this is my “great dane”. this was from canine heritage and they also said whippet and chesapeake bay retriever. that’s all they got. no other breeds were mentioned. wisdom panel said chihuahua (which we suspect is accurate) and coton de tulear.

 

 

OP- please update us on what happens!

Post # 66
Member
2424 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

View original reply
@Nona99  Really, Chows and Weimeranars? Those surprise me, I haven’t heard that insurance restriction before. The apartment I live they said no Dobermans, Rottweilers, Pit Bulls or German Shepards actually. The German Shephard one surprised me because they can be great family dogs but they can be trained to be aggressive/territorial (otherwise they wouldn’t be the standard police dog). Not that Dobermans/Rottweilers/Pit Bulls can’t be great family dogs too (my uncle has a huge Doberman that is a giant baby) but they have a bad reputation as aggressive dogs and are often trained that way.

Post # 67
Member
4 posts
Wannabee
  • Wedding: May 2013 - Holmdene Gardens @ Aquinas College and McFaddens Restaurant and Saloon

I run a dog rescue and we run into this kind of thing all the time. Everything that I would have advised you to do has already been said. Please keep us updated on the siutation, and good luck!

Post # 68
Member
2375 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

Personally, I’d get the test.  It’s not like a medical record, they can’t PROVE you ever had it done.  If it falls in your favor, then use it.  If not, burn it.  I know a friend who has a pitty (and believe me, there is no doubt when you look at his sweet face), and had a DNA test done because of liability.  That DNA test come up with lab, schnauzer, american bulldog, some toy breed that I can’t remember and a few others.  She shoved that report in everyone’s face, including her landlord, her insurance agent and random people that complained. 

 

It’s a pretty BS test.  There’s no such thing as a purebred dog from a DNA standpoint.  Every dog has been mixed with another dog at some point in their lineage to create the ‘breed’.  If you want a great example, look at the Doberman pinscher.  While the Doberman is currently a breed of its own, they were created when Louis Dobermann bred the German Shepherd and the German Pointer.  From there, he mixed in greyhounds, Manchester terriers, rottweilers, Weimeraners and probably several others to create that look.  This is why a ‘purebred Doberman’ will come back with all sorts of breeds in their DNA. 

 

I would suggest reading very carefully what breeds a test will check for.  Since the pit bull is not an AKC registered breed, a lot of tests won’t even list that as an option.  I see no issue with stacking decks in my favor, you shouldn’t either.

 

Post # 69
Member
38 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: June 2012

I agree with everything people are saying about not getting the test because then you can’t claim ignorance if the results come back with a measure (even a small one) of pit bull.  The other thing I think is important is that you need to be willing to threaten them with litigation for harrassment if they keep threatening you.  Basically, you need to make sure that their easiest option is to just leave you alone and accept the breed designation that you and your vet tell them.  

 

What if you wrote them a letter saying what breeds your dog is, stating that your vet backs this up, that there is no indication of forbidden breeds within his makeup, and saying that you “have consulted legal counsel to explore our options if this targeted harrassment continues?”  Then you also save that letter as documentation of your side of the story.  Right now, they seem to have all the power because they can threaten you with eviction, but ultimately you need to show them that it is in their best interests to let this go so that you don’t fight back and make a big problem for them. 

Post # 70
Member
2285 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: Central Park

Just have your pet sign some breed papers and decline any genetic testing. In the meantime you might want to find a different place because they don’t sound very pet friendly.

Post # 71
Member
1144 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: December 2011

Until they submit you something in writing I would just ignore it.

Post # 72
Member
488 posts
Helper bee

View original reply
@JuneKallah  I’m not sure if mentioning litigation at this point is a good idea, it may just piss the landlord off. 

 

I’m also not sure that this would actually be harassment, the complex owner asked her once what kind of dog it was and they signed a contract stating they wouldn’t get certain breeds. 

Post # 73
Member
3028 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

If you want some Corgi saliva let me know

Post # 74
Member
2959 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

If the “let it side” thing doesn’t work, the first thing I would do is demand to see this policy IN WRITING, including the circumstances where they can demand such testing, who pays for it etc.

Post # 75
Member
4801 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

View original reply
@harperlynn  Definitely not illegal, it’s actually super common due to insurance issues.

 

While I totally agree with everyone saying that dogs are a product of their environment, unfortunately the apartment complex is within their rights to not allow certain breeds whether we like it or not, and if it says they’re not allowed in OP’s lease, which it does, they’re kinda screwed. OP, I hope they’ll accept something in writing from your vet because otherwise this could get tricky.

Post # 76
Member
296 posts
Helper bee

@figgnewton  I know I’m late to the party, and have not read all of the comments before I decided to jump in, but I had a pitbull/greyhound mix that we thought was mixed with something else. We simply called the vet and told them we messed up his breed mix, and they just changed it. The next time he went to the vet, it showed up on his paperwork. No fuss, no charge.

Good luck.

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