(Closed) Considering a honeymoon in Ireland! Need advice!!

posted 7 years ago in Honeymoons
Post # 3
Member
3526 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

Hi!
We started off our honeymoon in Dublin, Ireland. We were only in Dublin for a day and a half and honestly felt like 2 days would have been enough to see it all. It’s SUCH a drinking city so unless you & your Fiance are into that 2 days is more than enough.
Shannon & Dublin seems to be the two biggest airports to fly into and out of so I would try to plan it perhaps that you fly into one and leave out of the other.

I dream of seeing some of the western counties and imagine a drive through the country side west to east or vice versa would be beautiful. We did rent a car to drive down the coast and even outside of Dublin it was beautiful! But it was def challenging driving there!

I believe there is a train that connects Shannon to Dublin? Or even a ferry perhaps?

Is your husband into golf or are you? I would try to fit in a golf day! They have some of the oldest and most beautiful golf courses in the world!

For me I kept checking Aer Lingus and Delta ended up being the cheapest airfare for me.

We stayed at a hostel in Dublin and a b&b in Rosslare (south of Dublin) that was just wonderful. If I were traveling through Ireland I would def try to stay at b&bs!

Can’t wait to go back one day and do what you are doing!

Post # 4
Member
167 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: April 2011

Yay for Ireland! I randomly took a four-day trip there myself three years ago and absolutely enjoyed it. I would totally go back. I flew into Dublin, spent St. Patrick’s day there sight-seeing, watching the parade…then I went to the western side of the country and explored the Cliffs of Moher, and little quaint towns, like Liscannor. I toured a castle, took a ferry ride and saw a dolphin (that was cool!), ate a LOT of fish and chips. Everything was so laid back, so peaceful. It was amazing, the people were so friendly, the scenery was gorgeous. I walked or rode a bus everywhere, maybe next time I’ll rent a bike to explore more of the countryside, and stayed at bed and breakfasts. I had a wonderful time.

If you’d like more specific information, I can look for my Ireland keepsakes at home and pass on the names of B&Bs I stayed at, restaurants I recommend, and the like.

Oh! And for this being your first time out of the country; there’s nothing to worry about. Everything’s in English, which makes traveling around a lot less stressful. (The only thing that would make me apprehensive in Ireland is driving on the opposite side of the road! That’s why I didn’t get a rental car.) Just make sure you get your passports in enough time, get a trusty map, and you’ll be good to go!

I’m so excited for you going to Ireland for your honeymoon! I know you haven’t committed, but I know that you will absolutely love it there!

Post # 5
Member
816 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

Do it!!!!  Ireland is at the top of my top countries list!!  It is so beautiful and the people (I’m sure I don’t need to tell you) are the friendliest you will meet!

We spent 5 days in Dublin (definitely didn’t feel like it was too long) and did a day trip to Wicklow Mountains which has a 6th century monastic settlement (absolutely surreal).  We did the traditional tourist things such as Temple Bar Area, Guinness Storehouse, Dublin Castle etc.  We just loved walking the streets and hitting random restaurants and pubs (the food there was amazing,, we both agreed best pizza, best chinese food, and best indian food we had ever had ANYWHERE and we’ve travelled quite a bit). 

I don’t really have any recommendations on where to stay,, we picked a place off priceline that was in south dublin (quite south) but transit is easy to navigate.  In hindsight I would definitely stay closer to River Liffey if it’s an option.

 

Post # 6
Member
4771 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

Yes you need a car.  Anywhere outside of dublin the transport sucks.  One location I can’t rave enough about are the Aran island.  They are often overlooked by tourists so they are less couded and spectacular.  The clifs of Moher have turned into the biggest tourist trap, I honestly suggest skipping it.  They built a massive stone wall around the cliff from which you see the clifs of Moher and it looks like crap.  Ring of Kerry is a must but skip it if its a foggy day, you won’t see anyhting.  Giant’s causeway is amazing.  I’m seriously thinking about doing a TTD shoot there.

I disagree about Dublin that there is nothing to do there.  In fact I’m writing a what to do in Ireland since my wedding is in NI and have some of the Dublin portion, I can share.

Dublin – If you’re going to visit one city in Ireland, Dublin should be it.  You can find great shopping, dining, history, culture, friendly people, and not to mention that it is the hometown of Guinness and Jameson.  For that reason alone, Dublin is a popular destination for out of towners.  Some of you may find the Dublin pass to be of interest: http://www.dublinpass.ie.  I have never used it.

Jameson factory tour– Just the best whisky in the world, and this is coming from a not once but twice certified whiskey taster.  That’s right.  Did I mention that the certificate is from Jameson? No? Well, it in no way discredits the fact.  So if you decide to go on this approximately one hour interactive Jameson commercial, be sure to raise your hand straight away after the guide asks for volunteers, and you just may join the ranks of qualified tasting individuals with this very exclusive certificate.

Guinness Storehouse– It’s just the most ubiquitous beverage or meal (whichever you prefer) in Ireland so it is no wonder that the storehouse is always abuzz with tourists.  Did you know that a pint of Guinness begins with the freshest of waters and includes only the best grade barley and hops? No?  Well, I’m sorry for just spoiling the whole tour for you.  This is no more than a glorified commercial for Guinness, but worth it if you’re a fan.  The bar at the top, where you get a free pint, is probably the best vantage point to see Dublin from above.  The catch is you have to go on the tour first to get here.

Book of Kells in Trinity College – There is an incredible build up of information, videos, and drawings to see one page of this approximately 10 x 5 ancient book protected from pesky fingers under glass.  Nevertheless, it is interesting, and I didn’t get bored of it until about the 4th viewing.  Contrary to popular belief, the highlight of this exhibition has nothing to do with the book.  After fighting a bunch of tourists to catch a glimpse of the book you go upstairs into a long room, named accordingly, “long room” which houses books from floor to ceiling and appears to have come straight out of a Harry Potter Movie.  This room is very impressive and as you admire all the knowledge that’s just sitting there accumulating dust be sure to find Ireland’s oldest harp which is on display here.

St. Patrick’s Cathedral – Bigger is better and the largest church in Ireland is no exception.  A €5.50 entrance fee allows you to wander around this cathedral with a bit confusing and wordy sheet of paper which will be your guide.  The readers and English literature majors may be happy to know that Jonathan Swift played a part in its history and can visit his final resting place.

Christ Church Cathedral – What it lacks in size it makes up for in age, since it is the oldest of the two cathedrals in Dublin.  A €6.00 entrance fee will get you an equally confusing and wordy sheet of paper to be your guide.  Since its crypt is the largest not only in Ireland but also in Britain, it is therefore more impressive than St. Patrick’s crypt and there you will find the preserved “Cat and Mouse,” found trapped behind the organ of the cathedral.

Dublinia – Perhaps suited for younger audiences or people who want to dress up as a Viking, a medieval knight, or a slave.  This museum, full of plastic statues of people in medieval garb hard at work, baking bread, or carving boats and takes you through a “lifelike” journey of Dublin’s Viking and medieval past.

Dublin Castle – Well worth a visit to see it from the outside at least if not going on the guided tour, which takes you through some of the state rooms and medieval fortifications.  An hour packed with history.

Dublin Goal – Often overlooked by tourists, this prison offers an interesting tour which shows just how good prisoners have it these days. It will open your eyes to the consequences of Ireland’s political unrest and famine.  I highly recommend this attraction, though you may have trouble finding it.

Strapped for cash? The National Gallery of Ireland, National Museum of Ireland Decorative Arts & History, National Museum of Ireland Archaeology, Irish Museum of Modern Art, and the Chester Beatty Library are all free!

Temple Bar – If you’ve had enough of history and culture and are ready to sit back, possibly listen to some Irish music, and be surrounded by at least one hen party then head to Temple Bar, and no I don’t mean the pub that’s literally called “The Temple Bar” but the area, Temple Bar.  A quirky street, lined with pubs, which is full of drunk blokes and girls tripping over cobblestones in too tall heels.  There you will find a pub to suit your flavor.

Hungry? –  Don’t worry, the days when the only food available in Ireland was cabbage and potatoes are long gone.  Dining options and variety are plentiful and mostly delicious.  In truth, you’ll have a hell of a time trying to find some cabbage and potatoes, and corned beef, forget it.   You’ll find nowadays “traditional” Irish fare or pub grub in any pub and most of them have a decent steak or fish and chips.  The restaurant area is located around the Dublin main tourist office on St. Anderw’s St.

Outside of Dublin:

Glendaloch/Wiklow Mountains: A short drive from Dublin will take you through a few cute villages and straight into the 6th century to a monastic settlement A short woodland loop walk will lead you to a tree great for a romantic photo opportunity and a picturesque lake.  More avid hikers can find the trails in the mountains of interest.  From here take the scenic route via back to Dublin.

Howth: Avid fish eaters will enjoy the many fish restaurants in this harbor town.  Hikers can hike up Howth Hill for spectacular views of the ocean.  Others can enjoy an ice cream on the pier.

(haven’t written about these yet, but they are all attractions near dublin so worth looking up)

Powerscourt:

Newgrange:

Trim:

Kildare:

Malahide:

Post # 7
Member
45 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: May 2011

I have never been to Ireland, but my Fiance and I are planning our honeymoon to England and Scotland. We booked our honeymoon through AAA and there were some great packages to Ireland in the booklet we got. There is a package where it’s basically you rent a car and get hotel or B and B vouchers and can plan your trip throughout the country. It was under $400, for like 10 days but didn’t include airfare.  It def seemed like a reasonable option. Once you book you can either book your hotels (with the vouchers) ahead of time or call ahead.

Post # 8
Member
5096 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

I lived in Galway for 6 months back in 2001 (gah!! 10 years ago!) and loved it.  You can’t go wrong on the west coast, as far as I’m concerned. Galway (at least when I was there 10 years ago) is a lively little city with some great food and music.  I second the person who mentioned the Aran Islands. I also spent some time in Donegal, which is beautiful and not as heavily touristed as Kerry and the Cliffs of Moher, but has some stunning seaside cliffs of its own.

@Atalanta: They built a WALL around the Cliffs of Moher?!

Edit: Yes, you most definitely need a car if you’re going anywhere outside Dublin.  Driving on the left takes a bit of getting used to, but you figure it out pretty quickly.

Post # 9
Member
477 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: March 2011

My friend did Ireland for their honeymoon.  The biggest thing she complained about (esp. the B&Bs) is that a LOT of the places have 2 twin beds as opposed to 1 bed.  And the places that had 1 beds were barely full-sized.  I’m sure there are many places in Ireland where this is not the case, but keep that in mind if you are doing a “roaming around and see what we find” kinda thing.  Try to check for reliable reviews and book in advance and let each place know you are on your honeymoon (although my friend said a lot of the places didn’t really care if it was your honeymoon or not.)  Unless of course, you don’t mind the sleeping arrangement!

 

 

Post # 9
Member
477 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: March 2011

My friend did Ireland for their honeymoon.  The biggest thing she complained about (esp. the B&Bs) is that a LOT of the places have 2 twin beds as opposed to 1 bed.  And the places that had 1 beds were barely full-sized.  I’m sure there are many places in Ireland where this is not the case, but keep that in mind if you are doing a “roaming around and see what we find” kinda thing.  Try to check for reliable reviews and book in advance and let each place know you are on your honeymoon (although my friend said a lot of the places didn’t really care if it was your honeymoon or not.)  Unless of course, you don’t mind the sleeping arrangement!

 

 

Post # 9
Member
477 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: March 2011

My friend did Ireland for their honeymoon.  The biggest thing she complained about (esp. the B&Bs) is that a LOT of the places have 2 twin beds as opposed to 1 bed.  And the places that had 1 beds were barely full-sized.  I’m sure there are many places in Ireland where this is not the case, but keep that in mind if you are doing a “roaming around and see what we find” kinda thing.  Try to check for reliable reviews and book in advance and let each place know you are on your honeymoon (although my friend said a lot of the places didn’t really care if it was your honeymoon or not.)  Unless of course, you don’t mind the sleeping arrangement!

 

 

Post # 10
Member
4771 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

@mightywombat:

Not the cliffs themselves but from the part you view the cliffs. This is the wall the cliffs are behind.  I’m not a tall person, but it came up to my neck, So you literally cannot take a pic of yourself in front of the cliffs

Post # 11
Member
4771 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

This is the viewing area there are stairs and you can see the people peering over the wall.  Sorry that they are so huge!

Post # 12
Member
4771 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

@Ginger123:

That’s true, if you’re going to luxury I do not reccomend Ireland as a honeymoon.  Lodging is really expensive and affordable places are going to be basic.  But if you’re going for nature, it is very romantic.

Post # 13
Member
6351 posts
Bee Keeper

We stayed in Killarney, Kilkenny and Dublin (13).

The bed and breakfasts we stayed at were all amazing. Fabulous food.

Post # 14
Hostess
11278 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

I haven’t been to all of Ireland. I took Fiance to Dublin last July for his birthday and we flew with Aer Lingus and I was imprseed. I agree with Atalanta regarding must see visits are Guiness Storehouse, Kilmainhaim Goal, Temple Bar, Book of Kells at Trinity College.

The topic ‘Considering a honeymoon in Ireland! Need advice!!’ is closed to new replies.

Find Amazing Vendors