(Closed) Constantly Barking Dog

posted 7 years ago in Pets
Post # 17
Member
9681 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

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@sam.stoinski:  I know that shock collars do work, but I’m sure hitting or hurting anyone too innocent to understand would work. I don’t agree with shock collars at all. I think you need to be a strong trainer so that you don’t have to resort to hurting the animal. That’s not really “training,” it’s more fear. I cry any time my little guy gets hurt (he tends to walk into things) so I can’t imagine inflicting the pain on my own :-

Post # 20
Member
2597 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

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@MrsPanda99:  I edited my post to take out the suggestion for the bark collar.  I guess I was thinking they were more startling than painful but in any case, you’re right – being a strong trainer is the far better solution.

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@sam.stoinski:  Ah good.  We have neighbors in back of us who have a dog that barks CONSTANTLY and we can hear him in every single room of our house.  We hate those neighbors!

Post # 21
Hostess
11163 posts
Sugar Beekeeper

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@sam.stoinski:  They come in a variety of sizes and yes they address barking. Most dogs don’t just bark to bark…there is a reason behind it. Whether it is pent up agression, frustration, have to potty, anxiety, fear, territorial etc there is a reason. Thundershirts address a few of these issues and I found it worked for my little guy.

Like I said it is 100% returnable without any hassle for a full refund so you really can’t lose if it doesn’t work.

Post # 22
Member
396 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2013

At some point our dog started barking whenever someone entered the building for a different apartment.  We tried to get her to stop in various ways and then one day my fiance sprayed her with a water bottle (that we had sitting around for the cat!).  She pretty much stopped barking entirely that day.  A couple of times we had to pick up the water bottle again, but she did not forgot what was going to happen if she didn’t stop barking. 

I’m a big softy so of course this made me feel bad to do but it worked. She still will growl a bit sometimes when someone comes home.  Anyway this might be a cheaper solution than a bark-collar!

Post # 23
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9681 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

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@Zhabeego: I have no problem with the vibrating collars or the clickers as a training aid, but I don’t think hurting is the right approach. It just reminds me an angry person thinking, oh, you won’t listen to me? I will just hurt you until you do! Some dogs are stubborn and I get that it’s annoying. But persistance pays off. I would hire a trainer before I would resort to shocks. Barking is a common issue they deal with 🙂 It just how the dogs communicate, so they have to learn to do it in other ways.

Post # 25
Member
738 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

We have been using a spray bottle on our 4 year old, 12 lb miniature longhair dachshund. We rescued her about 2 years ago, and prior to coming to live with us was terribly abused. We’ve waited this long to really address the barking issue because it took her this long to get used to us and get back to being a “real dog” again. 

The yelling doesn’t work. I refuse to put a shock collar on a dog. So we tried the spray bottle. I’m not sure it’s the best method, but it seems to be working. I’m worried that she’s afraid of the bottle, and it’s more of a fear thing than anything else. But if she starts barking, all I have to do is get the bottle, and she’s quiet. So we’ll go with it for now. I’d like to get to the point where she barks a few times, and then I can say “enough” or some other command to let her know that she should be quiet now. But for today, its the spray bottle.

Post # 26
Member
311 posts
Helper bee

@sam.stoinski:  we got a sonic egg for our dogs and it works. I don’t leave it on all the time because non barking sounds can set it off. 

Post # 28
Member
6114 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

“a door shutting 10 miles away”

 

I laughed at that one.

 

 

 

There are different types of barking too:

 

  • alert barking (hey someone is here, look at that)
  • request barking (play with me, i need to go outside)
  • scary barking (what was that noise, I’m scared)
  • boredom barking (I get no exercise or attention so I’m going to bark my headoff)

 

Sounds like she is alerting you most of the time of something.  If it’s alerting, they might feel like they are doing their doggie duties by alerting their pack.  My dog does this wth the door and I let her do it once (see below).  If it’s request barking, don’t cave to their requests!   If they are scared, maybe desensitization or positive reinforcement is in order (dpends on the scary thing).  And boredom, well that is obviously, exercise the dog and stimulate their mind more.

 

 

If my dog barks, I go over to her, I say “focus” and she looks at me.  I then say “all done,” wait until she’s quiet, and I reward her when she’s quiet.  If she barks right after I make her focus again until she’s quiet, then I reward her.  I let her bark once to alert me of the door bell (she’s got to think she’s doing her job), but then that’s it.  One bark and “all done.”

Post # 29
Member
10361 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2010

Yelling at a dog for it to stop barking only eggs them on more. They interpret your harsh tone/threatning stance as an alarm signal on your part, and bark more in response.

The citronella collars are a good alternative, and so is distracting them/making a game up to draw them away from what they are barking at. If you redirect them to something positive or fun, they won’t feel the need to protect anything/bark.

Post # 30
Member
2515 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: December 2011

here’s a horror story for anyone who wants to use shock collars:

i was babysitting/petsitting once and the family used a shock collar on their dog. i took the dog for a walk and she was acting strange and kept wimpering but i wasn’t sure why. i checked the collar and the stupid thing was malfunctioning and shocking her every few seconds! i couldn’t take it off because we were out on a walk. i got her back to the house as soon as i could and took the damn thing off. those collars are absolutely horrible and inhumane. there are better ways to train your dog to bark less. also, dogs barking is their form of communication and they need to be able to bark. excessive barking can be taken care of through training but please don’t expect your dog to never bark. 

Post # 31
Member
2606 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2009

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sienna76 and 
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crayfish already said much of what I was going to say…that it sounds like she’s alert barking (if she’s part terrier, it’s not surprising), and that redirection is probably your best bet.  

 

In your other thread, you mentioned that you had slacked off on training your dogs.  You have now added another member to your pack, and a third dog adds a new dynamic…you now have a pack.  You not only need to train the new dog, but the existing dogs need training, too.  I would seriously start with Nothing In Life Is Free, (NILIF) with ALL of your dogs.  It’s easy to do, and doing it will teach your dogs impulse control and help them feel more secure, (which could help with the barking on its own), and also help you regain control and be able to redirect when/if the barking dog occur.  Also, I would take at least the newest dog to basic obedience, and then implement what you learn in class with your other dogs, (ideally all of the dogs would go, but that can be hard to do with multiple dogs).

 

 

 

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@calibee79:  those collars are absolutely horrible and inhumane. there are better ways to train your dog to bark less.

 

Exactly.  They are cruel and inhumane.  They are NOT training, they are taking the lazy way out instead of actually putting time and effort into understanding your dog and training them.

 

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