Cosmetic Surgery

posted 5 days ago in Wellness
Post # 16
Member
4286 posts
Honey bee

rosebee17 :  Oh good to hear! I’m sick of the clicking and locking!! Thanks!

Post # 17
Member
252 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: January 2016

Ugh I had that surgery done when I was 17 because of jaw issues. Compared to other surgeries (shoulder, c-section, breast reduction) it was rough! The screws still bug me and the nerve damage is just a pain in the butt. It is the only surgery I have had that I would 100% not do again. I had to have my teeth reworked as well and all my front teeth are crowns which is stupidly expensive to maintain. 

You would get it for different reasons and may have much higher satisfaction since it’ll certainly address appearance, but I would really caution you. It’s a beast of a surgery. 

Post # 18
Member
2070 posts
Buzzing bee

knotyet : Don’t mean to thread hijack, but how was the gum graft surgery? I have gum recession from having braces/retainers for years, and have quite a bit of sensitivity because of it. 

Post # 21
Member
252 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: January 2016

sweatergal007 :  just the breaking and resetting with a titanium plate. It was over a decade ago and I wasn’t of age so don’t have all the specifics. I believe it’s called la forte. I have a lot of degeneration and wear/tear in my jaw joint because the discs slid back out of place when I was 10 and never came back. I’m hopeful there will be a better solution in the future that is affordable. I hate that jaw stuff is generally not covered by insurance and therefore not a highly funded area of research. 

Post # 22
Member
4286 posts
Honey bee

throughthelookingglass87 :  I hate that too. I was told worst case scenario they would take my disk out and later I’d need jaw joint replacement if it hurt again. Second opinion said no not that see if you can find someone to “relocate” it, rare no one does it hardly. Dentist said you need a mouth guard. I’m about to try my THIRD mouthguard. But it doesn’t work. Jaw doesn’t feel right if that makes sense plus pain. 

And insurance doesn’t want to cover anything. Some PT is all. Ughhh. I feel like we’re an untapped market. 

 

Post # 23
Member
9318 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 2010

sweatergal007 :  

The surgeon I have now whom I love is in my new state, not in California.

But, I can point you to a good one if you don’t mind a road trip to Palm Springs, Maria Lombardo.

 

Home

 

 

 

Post # 24
Member
1555 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2017

browneyedgirl24 :  Surprisingly not bad! I cried in fear when they told me they don’t use IV sedation for that procedure anymore. When I got my wisdom teeth out, the surgery itself was no big deal, because I had an IV. For gum grafts, they’ll give you anxiety meds pre-procedure if you want, but other than that it’s all local, not even gas. I was prescribed 3 mg Ativan pre-procedure, which ensured I don’t remember much. Local during the procedure meant I felt nothing during. The recovery was so easy that I didn’t even take the hardcore pain meds I was given and just took the prescribed Motrin. My periodontist was highly recommended and has 5 star ratings on every review site, and they caught my recession early, so I think all of that contributed.

Things that I would check from a periodontist to ensure it’s smooth sailing. 

1. Make sure they use periodontal dressings for the graft site. This made recovery easy, prevented  temperature sensitivity, and prevented my accidentally dislodging the graft or stitches. When they took it off at my first post-op appointment 12 days later, the site was entirely healed over due to this dressing. 

2. Make sure they use stents for the donor site. This made recovery and eating after surgery so much easier. 

3. Have lots of mushy foods and drinkable meals ready. I couldn’t eat solid food for the first week, couldn’t bite into anything or eat harder/firmer food for the next week. By the third week I could eat normally and got a burger!

Post # 25
Member
2070 posts
Buzzing bee

knotyet :  Thank you, that’s super helpful! Glad to hear it wasn’t too bad. Not sure if I’m at the point of needing this yet, but definitely something I will consider talking about with my dentist next time I go in. 

Post # 26
Member
139 posts
Blushing bee

I had double jaw surgery three years ago to fix a pretty bad underbite. We had to try and get insurance to get it approved twice, as they denied it the first time. Does it affect your eating? I had difficulties eating sandwiches and stuff like that. Overall, it wasn’t that bad, but I healed quicker than most patients my surgeon had. Your jaw is not wired shut, but you have extra strength rubber bands hooked onto your braces. The worst part was not being able to eat solid foods, although I did eat noodles cut up super small at like 3-4 weeks because I was starving. Definitely go through the benefits and risks, as I completely understand not being confident with your smile!

Post # 27
Member
1445 posts
Bumble bee

nerk :  nerk :  I’ve had maxillofacial surgery to fix an underbite. My jawline was fine, but my maxilla wasn’t as defined as it should’ve been—hence the underbite. Nothing was physically noticeably wrong with my face before, and most people who I haven’t seen in a while can’t even tell I had it done. The only thing that has changed is my facial profile, which was what I was concerned with anyway. I’m glad I got it done. Although I had it done 4 years ago, I’m now back in braces because my orthodontic treatment didn’t give my teeth the look I was after. 

 

The surgery recovery process was actually less painful than having wisdom teeth extracted. The biggest complaint is by the 3rd day (the worst of the swelling) I looked like my upper lip had been stung by a swarm of bees. I thought I was okay that day to go to the grocery store by myself, so I had my mom drop me off at the door. I almost passed out in the frozen aisle from exhaustion! So yeah, it’ll make you tired for a few days, but otherwise it was fine. I was 21 at the time of the surgery. 

 

I understand feeling insecure about your oral area. It’s the thing you use to communicate with everyone else. Even if no one else notices your bite, YOU notice it. Do you think since you’ve got an overbite issue, insurance could cover a portion  of it? My insurance covered like 85% and I ended up owing around $1k and I paid on that monthly…

Post # 28
Member
1433 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2016

nerk :  have you gone to any dental surgeons to get a few different opinions? i only ask because i too spent years in braces, head gear, expanders, the whole lot…. it did straighten my teeth, but after god knows how many years none of it worked to correct my bite like it was suppose to and my only option was jaw surgery. Insurance did cover it because they considered it to be medically necessary. 

i would definitely look more into it before giving up. If your dentist and orthodontist, etc can prove that this is a medically necessary procedure to improve your quality of eating, life, whatever. I would think insurance would cover part of it. 

Post # 29
Member
1341 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: February 2017 - Seattle, WA

I had double jaw surgery 2 years ago. My insurance (premera blue cross) covered it but I still had to pay $10k out of pocket plus about $5k for the braces. Definitely not cheap!!!!! Was it worth it?? Maybe…. my jaw looks better now but has I known what the entire cost would be up front I’m not sure I would have gone through with it. I also want a nose job which will be another $5-$6k.

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