Could I be pregnant??

posted 2 weeks ago in TTC
Post # 2
Member
1803 posts
Buzzing bee

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@betsyphan:  

Symptom spotting will just drive you crazy. It’s unreliable and periods being late, spotting..it can happen without pregnancy being part of the picture. If you think you may be pregnant then do some tests every other day over the course of a week,long enough to be sure that you allowed enough time for hypothetical hormone levels to build. Stay away from blue dye tests, they’re notorious for false negatives. Get a pink dye test. The cheapie hcg sticks are the easiest to read.

Post # 4
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1803 posts
Buzzing bee

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@betsyphan:  

Start now since you’re having period onset symptoms. Symptoms are the same with very early pregnancy. I sympathize that with pcos, figuring this out must be frustrating. Best of luck.

Post # 5
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1803 posts
Buzzing bee

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@betsyphan:  

Just adding that with pcos, you may benefit from progesterone supplements if/when you conceive to support a healthy pregnancy. Blood work can be done to track both hcg levels and progesterone levels to be sure both are where they should be. You may want to be sure your doctor is on board with monitoring you in very early pregnancy to determine if intervention is needed.

Post # 6
Member
993 posts
Busy bee

If you have PCOS, you can still be temping. It won’t predict ovulation but it will tell you after the fact, so at least you know when to expect your period/preg test. 

Post # 8
Member
271 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: December 2017

When you start TTC, you start noticing a million things that you swear never happened before, but they actually did, you just weren’t paying nearly as much attention. Here’s the thing – you can buy bulk packs of super cheap pregnancy tests that detect as low as 10 IU of HCG in your system. If your HCG level isn’t at least at that (extremelyyy low) amount, then it is absolutely not high enough to cause ANY symptoms. So if the test is negative, they’re not pregnancy symptoms. The “symptoms” you’re having at that point are from progesterone, which rises after ovulation regardless of if you’re pregnant or not. 

All of that being said, just because the test is negative today doesn’t mean it can’t be positive a few days from now. But if you’re getting a negative test today, you’re not having pregnancy symptoms today. When I learned that, it saved me SO much time and energy! Good luck. 

Post # 9
Member
1873 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2019

Just adding that my ovulation temperature is around 98.8 to 99.2 – normal temps for me are between 96.8 to 97.5. I test very early in the morning. I’ve been temping for my entire fertile life and outside of a couple anovulatory cycles and a few strange readings, these temperature ranges have always been the same! But I think it’s a little different for everyone.

Post # 10
Member
993 posts
Busy bee

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@betsyphan:  you need a basal body temperature thermometer. It measures only a small range of temperature. Any drugstore should have them. As far as “ideal” temperature, there isn’t one. You’ll see a noticeable sustained rise after ovulation though, of at least .4 degrees Fahrenheit or so. There are charting apps out there that make it easy to see. I use Fertility Friend. You need to make sure you take your temperature at the same time each morning as soon as you wake up. 

Post # 11
Member
2473 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2017

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@betsyphan:  I have PCOS, and we got pregnant the second cycle trying, so it is possible. I’m on Metformin and it’s helped regulate my cycles, but they were off again when I got off BC. 

1. You don’t need a basal thermometer. Your temperature will go up by 2-4 tenths of a degree, which a regular thermometer will display. The only difference between a basal thermometer and a regular thermometer (besides price) is that a basal thermometer measures another decimal place of a degree, and you don’t need that. In fact it could lead to over analyzing temperatures which will only stress you out.

2. Everyone’s typical temperature is different. You’ll need to start taking and noting your temperature every morning. You need to take your temp before getting up, before lots of movement, before drinking water, using the bathroom, etc. for it to be an accurate basal body temp reading. 

3. You can track on paper, but I recommend an app. I used Kindara. They may have a paid premium version, but I used the free version, and it’s all you need. 

4. You can also track cervical mucous (CM). Research fertile cervical mucous, which will help you nail down ovulation. 

5. Try ovulation predictor kits (OPKs). They worked for me. I’d start to use OPKs a week or so after the end of your period.

6. If you’re like me with my PCOS, your body may sometimes gear up for ovulation, and then fail to actually do so. This would lead to longer length cycles. In my case, my temp would drop (some women experience a sharp drop in temp the day before ovulation) and I would have fertile CM, and OPKs would show I was nearing a peak when my body tried to ovulate, but then my temp wouldn’t rise to confirm ovulation. I would continue to use OPKs and try again. I didn’t figure this out until the second cycle, so my first cycle trying really didn’t have a chance because our intercourse was not well timed and we missed our fertile window. 

7. OPKs can be expensive, especially if you have to use them for longer because your PCOS causes failed ovulation attempts. I bought the Walmart Equate ones. They cost $15 for a pack, and they also include a pregnancy test. 

8. Once your temp rises by at least 2-4 tenths of a degree, and remains 2-4 tenths of a degree higher for 3 days, you’ll know you ovulated, and you have what’s called the two week wait to test. Even if you’re not successful in conceiving with the tracked cycles, you can start to better predict ovulation based on the typical amount of days after AF that it happens. 

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