(Closed) Could you live w/o your pets for a couple years? Could the pets adjust also?

posted 7 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
9824 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

If it were me, I’d go for the on campus housing and skype a lot. But if you are persistent in looking for off campus places, lot of landlords are willing to be flexible if you offer to pay an additional pet fee and the animals are house trained.

Post # 4
Member
686 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

I’ve done this (Weenie lived with grandma and grandpa for about a year and a half while I cared for my ex) and ever since, he has separation anxiety. It didn’t work for my dog.

 

Post # 5
Member
11325 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: February 2011

I would definitely not do this. 

Post # 6
Member
3049 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: January 1991

I wouldn’t be able to live more than a month (maybe less) without my dog. He has gotten more through so much and I don’t even want to think about leaving him anywhere for that long. I also don’t think HE could stand it. He practically dies everytime I leave the house (even 5 minutes). He was so mad at me when I left him for a week to go on vacation. No worries, he doesn’t have dog anxiety, he is just REALLY excited when I get back, and REALLY sad when I’m gone… to the point of not eating. Weirdo.

I’m not saying you’re wrong for doing leaving your pets, you just asked what if I could do it, and I can’t 🙁 If good people are taking care of your pets, and are willing to give them back, and it saves money… sure go ahead. 

Post # 7
Member
25 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: July 2012

No way!!

Post # 8
Member
5921 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: December 2010

If it were me, I would keep looking for pet friendly housing. I couldn’t be without my dog, regardless of the money I would save.

Post # 10
Member
283 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

I could not do this.

More importantly, while my animals could theoretically “do it”, I can’t see how it would be in the best interest of the animal. Moves in general are very stressful for animals, and even more stressful it if involves a person other than the one(s) they are used to.

It would be one thing if it was a few weeks, or even a few months. But a couple of years? The animals would have to readjust to a new home and a new family, only to be ripped away from them and thrown into another unfamiliar environment. That’s really not fair for the animals.

I will say that yes, it is certainly better than a shelter, and if it is your only option other than a shelter than it is surely the best choice. However, it sounds like you are more than capable of either waiting to move or finding a place that will allow pets. Until recently when of my cats passed away, I had 3 cats. I also had a foster dog. I do not live in a “pet friendly” city but I was able to find a place that allows pets. You just have to search, it can be done.

Good luck to you, I hope you make the best decision possible for your animals.

Post # 11
Member
10851 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2010

I couldn’t do it. I went to Italy for three months and left my cats with my parents. The older one, Peter, who acts all tough and like he doesn’t care ended up at the vets office for pretty much all three months because he was depressed and suffering from seperation anxiety. It cost me about $3000 in vet bills. He only perked up when I called my ex from Italy and asked him to go visit the damn cat. He pulled through it but since then he definitely has a whole lot of attachment issues. We can go away for two weeks at a time if we have my Brother-In-Law or another family member stay at the house with him, but when we get home he nearly EXPLODES with excitement and we can’t leave him alone for a good few days without him getting kind of frantic about it. I wouldn’t leave him for that long again. Poor monkey.

Post # 12
Member
10287 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2011

I could never do it. Lincoln (our kitty) is like a son to us. He is unbelievably attached to Fiance and I and I don’t think that he would ever survive with anyone else. Sounds strange but the 3 of us have this weird bond.

Ok, now I sound like a psycho…

Post # 13
Member
283 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

I just read your follow up post, and you have to understand the difference between a couple of days and a matter of years. There really is no comparison. At some point the pet will stop expecting you to come back, and will identify itself as a member of his/her new “pack”. It isn’t just a vacation, a time period that long will require the animal to integrate into his/her new family in order to feel comfortable, safe, and happy.

As a ‘crazy cat lady’ (and proud of it!), I have to say that cats are not as “flexible” as you think. Cats are very easily stressed, much less trusting, and tend to bond closely to only those they know well. In my experience, they actually respond less favorably than dogs, and I have seen many stress induced illnesses in cats that are dumped by their families.

Post # 14
Member
374 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: January 2011

I wouldn’t do it.  If you plan on leaving them then you should leave them for good.  While you’re away they’re going to form new bonds with the people who are taking care of them.  It will be tramatic twice, once when you leave and then again when you take them back.

Post # 15
Member
7770 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2010

I would leave my dog with a person I really trusted — maybe.  My dog has had many many many changes, so she is very adaptable.  We have lived in many places and had many roommates.  I think it is best to look for a place that allows pets though- because I think it is the right thing to do- not because I think the pets will change- but again- my dog is possibly different because of how she grew up. 

Post # 16
Member
11325 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: February 2011

The thing is… you can’t explain to a pet why you’re doing it or that it isn’t forever. In their eyes– it will be abandonment. Maybe they’ll get over it? I have a rescue dog and he seems very happy with me (although a bit traumatized at first), but he definitely has anxiety issues stemming (I’d have to guess) from his abandonment by his first owners. Then you’re talking about taking them back in 1-2 YEARS. By which point they’d probably be used to their new living situations and think that THOSE people abandoned them… thus screwing with their heads a second time. 

You say 80-90% of apartments are not pet friendly… that means that 10-20% of them are. I’d go that route. 

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