(Closed) Crate training help.

posted 6 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
4352 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

We got a rescue dog (5 year old breeder, never house trained, lost den instinct). Who started out not barking and then realized if she did we would get up to take her out (so we would not have to clean up poop in her crate). And then she took advantage of that. We got a barking machine, as I like to call it, that emits a high pitched (annoying to the dog, not painful, inaudible to us) noise everytime she barks. It has cut down the barking SO much. We also put her on a schedule, and I set alarms so that we were taking her out often enough (we did the whole every two hours thing for two weeks because the shelter we got her from said to treat her like a puppy). Now she only barks when she is in her crate if someone upstairs (apartments) makes a noise that scares her, or if I sleep through one of the alarms (I should not do that I know).

Keep doing the so many seconds thing with the door closed stuff. Also, we left treats in our dog’s crate when she wasn’t looking. So if she went in on her own she would find something good. She goes in all the time now when we walk by and waits for a treat (we don’t give them to her just for that anymore, but she still does it lol). 

Post # 4
Member
4824 posts
Honey bee

If you remove her water several hours before bed she will not go the bathroom as much. As another PP said when she makes a noise you take her outside. If she ends up not making a noise you set your alarm for every few hours. If you are not giving her water then she can hold it longer at night. The general rule of thumb for a puppy is they can hold it 1 hour for each month of their age.

When you take her out to go pee, you give her a chance to go, but dont let her play so she doesnt learn that barking  = outside play time.

Also as PP said, putting a treat in the crate when you put her in will help make it a pleasant place to be for her. 

I would also use the crate “for no reason”. When you are home and she can see you, I would put her in there for a few minutes with a treat and then open the door for her to come out when she is ready. Then she learns the crate isnt for the “sad” times when its bed time or time for you to leave.

Post # 5
Member
1240 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

Basically PP have covered everything. Maybe put a shirt of yours in there, and cover the crate so it feels more den like.

Post # 7
Member
4352 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

@Mrs Hedgehog:  I know it does not bother the dog next door (he still barks just as much :/). And we used a different one when we visited my parents that was not automatic and my parents dog just ignored it. Different dogs respond to it differently. Some stop barking and others don’t pay any attention. It does take them a little while to figure out that it makes the noise because they bark. We got one with a “volume setting” which lets you adjust how loud it is for the dog, and we keep it on a pretty low setting. If youre just worried about when she is in the crate at night, you can keep it on a low setting and Ari probably would not  hear it because you are in another room. I would keep it on the lowest setting that works anyways. I don’t know which model we have, but if you want I can ask Fiance when he gets home tonight.

Post # 8
Member
187 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

I highly recommend (as awful as it may be) to set an alarm clock for every 2-3 hours and take turns letting your puppy outside.  The problem with leaving her in the crate all night while you sleep is that she is not going to be able to hold it and eventually, she’ll get over soiling in the place that she sleeps, and then crate training (which is dependent upon that instinct) is going to be useless.  Puppies that young are like having infants… lots and lots of work, but worth it when she’s housebroken and well trained. 

Post # 9
Member
1737 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

I second the shirt idea. Our pup cried all the time in his crate until a friend gave me the idea to put a shirt in there with him that smelled like us. So, a few hours before bed, I’d wear an old t-shirt around the house and then put it in his crate with him. It worked great.

Post # 10
Member
2463 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

the crate could also be too big–dogs don’t like to be near their own waste, so when they’re really small as pups, it’s good to put a cardboard box in the crate with them to make the space where they roam around smaller

Post # 12
Member
2819 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: February 2013

I don’t have much experience with crate training because I was a child when my family got our dog, but I do remember that we put the crate in my room & I slept in a sleeping bag on the floor beside the puppy’s crate. She didn’t cry too much that way, especially if I stuck my fingers in the bars for her to lick.

Might also be easier to take Cambria out that way, too!

Post # 15
Member
4352 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

We use the PC06G Bark Free Koolatron. It looks like you can get it online for less than $40 + shipping & handling.

Post # 16
Member
27 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: September 2011

A few things that helped us – try putting the crate in your room, next to your bed so she can see you when she (and you go to sleep) so she doesn’t feel so isolated.  But she’ll still get the potty training benefits!  The other thing that helped my dog (and you’re going to think I’m a nut) is to get one of those sound machines and set it “heartbeat”.  You can also get free apps (like Whitenoise) if you have an iphone and speakers that will do the same thing.  They say that this makes them feel more like they are next to their mother and they will be more comforted!  Good luck – that screaming in the crate thing is misery!!

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