(Closed) Declaw or not?

posted 8 years ago in Pets
  • poll: Should we declaw our cat or not?
    Yes : (36 votes)
    21 %
    No : (139 votes)
    79 %
  • Post # 3
    Member
    555 posts
    Busy bee

    Please don’t, it’s inhumane. It is as if they cut a human’s finger off to the knuckle. It could also increase aggression and biting in a cat.

    Post # 4
    Member
    2239 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: May 2011

    I personally feel it’s inhumane to declaw cats. Check this website out. http://www.declawing.com/

    Post # 5
    Member
    2006 posts
    Buzzing bee

    Our cat is declawed. The cat was actually my sisters and when she moved in my mom said it had to be declawed (we just moved and had all new furniture). I know a lot of people think it is animal abuse, but our 10 year old cat seems perfectly happy. He is a 100% indoor cat (his long fur guaranteed that!) and the few times he goes outside it is with someone.

    It is a personal decision so I can’t really say yes or no. If you don’t think it is animal cruelty, and your cat will always be indoors then I say yes. But if you think there is ever going to be a point in time where it will become an outdoor (even for an hour a day) cat then I would say no.

    Post # 6
    Member
    2289 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: November 2010

    Please, please, PLEASE don’t declaw your kitty! It’s a horrific practice. Honestly, I was scratched as a child. It healed, it wasn’t a big deal, and I learned a valuable lesson about how to read my kitty and when to leave her alone.  

    Post # 7
    Member
    11325 posts
    Sugar Beekeeper
    • Wedding: February 2011

    please please please don’t do it! It is so cruel! 🙁 When I had a kitty I cut his nails with (human) nail clippers every week. I started when he was a kitten so it was never a big deal. Seriously 5 minutes  a week and they never got sharp! Also, get a squirt bottle and watch the cat when its around the furniture. First time he tries to scratch anything spray him! Cats learn pretty quick! Regarding your kid… the most important thing is to teach them how to act around pets. No poking, use 2 fingers, touch gently, no pulling, hitting, etc and definitely watch your child around any pet. They have no reason to lash out if they’re treated right. 🙂

    Post # 8
    Member
    1154 posts
    Bumble bee

    Claws are a very connected part of a cat, more so than our fingernails (which any human would not like to lose) it’s more like our fingertips up to the first joint.  So to declaw the cat would be to cripple it slightly.  Now people who lose fingers or even limbs often recover well and expereince no pain after recovery and lead happy lives – so a declawed cat can also obviously lead a happy life but I would not declaw a cat and would strongly urge you not to.

    Cats are in complete control over their claws, so she will not claw the 2 year old unless she means to, animals are usually very gentle with what they can tell are babies/children and if the cat did want to hurt the baby she could do it with her teeth as well.  I would not think this is a danger unless your cat is a particularly feral one.

    Not all cats scratch furniture and most will not if they have adequate scratching posts that they like.  Even cats that claw and prefer furniture can be taught not to by squirting and other methods.

    I think declawing is a serious injury and is not necessary because all concerns can be alevieted in other ways.

     

    Post # 9
    Member
    1060 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: July 2010 - Anela Garden Chapel & Japanese Cultural Center, Honolulu

    I vote against declawing. you could use those little rubber nail guards that make it look like your cat has finger nail polish on! I don’t remember what they are called but they looked so awesome..

    Post # 10
    Member
    405 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: October 2010

    Please don’t do it! Just see this quote from the link kate169 posted…

    Declawing is an irreversible surgical procedure that involves amputating the last joint of the cat’s “toes.” It is a very painful procedure with strong potential to secondary complications. (Imagine having the last joint of your own fingers amputated. Not a pleasant idea.)”

    Post # 11
    Member
    485 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: July 2010

    Please do not declaw your cat. If you want to declaw it you should save it the lifetime of pain and give it away to someone who wouldn’t do such an awful thing. My vet won’t even perform the declawing procedure.

    Sorry to be blunt.

    To add: I have three strictly indoor cats. I just trim their nails myself. I play with them a lot and very rarely get a scratch. They also have two scratching posts.

    Post # 12
    Hostess
    18643 posts
    Honey Beekeeper
    • Wedding: June 2009

    Please don’t.  It causes so many emotional problems to cats.  We have 2 and they don’t claw the furniture because we have things that they are allowed to claw.  We also trim their nails every few weeks so they don’t get any bright ideas.

    Post # 13
    Member
    2006 posts
    Buzzing bee

    @Emshaw: That was rude an uncalled for. My cat is not in a “lifetime of pain” and he has been declawed for 10 years. I think all the love, food, treats, and toys he gets has spared him. I respect your opinion (in fact if I were to ever have my own cat I would not have it declawed), but please don’t insinuate we are bad pet owners because of this decision.

    Post # 14
    Member
    2239 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: May 2011

    Even if you plan on keeping kitty inside, there’s always a chance she could make her escape one day…(Mine has snuck out a couple times when we weren’t being really careful) and could end up getting lost/needing to defend herself. You just never really know.

    Post # 15
    Member
    979 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: May 2010

    Don’t do it!  To me, it is on the same level as de-barking dogs: unnecessary and inhumane.  Cats have claws for a reason and when you take them away you are taking away their sense of security and their one means of protection.  Cats can be trained just like dogs and there are many ways to reinforce the idea that you don’t want it to use its claws: spray bottles, scent deterrents, surface deterrents, etc.

    Post # 16
    Member
    941 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: October 2010

    growing up, my cat was declawed and an outdoor cat and he turned out just fine. our family just didn’t know better. but i wouldn’t do it now, after the humane society made my family promise not to declaw the second cat they adopted many years ago, i did some research and realized how painful it was for them.

    i wouldn’t go as far as to ridicule and lecture you, because i think it’s a decision we have to make for ourselves once research has been done. good luck!

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