(Closed) Declaw or not?

posted 11 years ago in Pets
  • poll: Should we declaw our cat or not?

    Yes

    No

  • Post # 122
    Member
    1580 posts
    Bumble bee

    @Rosie- I think you are 100% right to put your child first. My family got a cat when I was about 14 from a shelter. My parents had her declawed in the front. Before she was declawed, I was tying my shoe one day and the cat came to pounce on the lace. I still have a scar on my finger from that scratch, so don’t listen to everyone else who says “it’s just a scratch” because it’s not. My cat never scratched to intentionally harm, but imagine if she would have accidentally scratched my face.

    We tried to make the cat an indoor car, but she wont stay inside, so now she in an indoor/outdoor cat. She climbs trees, defends herself, and still catches birds and mice and whatever. She has no behavior problems and always uses her litter box (or outside). It has been 12 years, and she’s fine.

    For those who seem so sure that there is a better home for all these cats than with an owner who declaws, I dont’ think so. From a survey conducted by American Humane, 71% of cats that enter shelters are euthanized.

    Post # 123
    Member
    2767 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: September 2009

    don’t do it.  it’s painful for the cat and can cause them to have problems with the litterbox.  If you find that your kitten is scratching furniture buy them a nice scratching post.  one with rope wrapped all around it.  or buy it one of those cardboard scratch posts that you can put the catnip in.  my cats love those things.  they have already gone through 3 really nice scratching posts that my dad made for them with old carpet and pieces of rope.  if we see them scratching the furniture we try to go put them by the scratching post instead.  they get the point pretty quickly.  

    Post # 124
    Member
    3124 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: December 2009

    @neato – curious about the litter thing! is that just after the surgery? or for their whole life? ANy time our cats, declawed or not, are having issues and have to visit the doctor we use that newspaper litter to not hurt their paws or get in wounds etc. Do long time declawed cats still have problems with regular clumpy litter?

    And in my personal experience, though I voted no on declawing, the 4 declawed cats I’ve had in my life and around little kids have never ever turned aggressive after the surgery. Could it be your line of work, if you see more cats? Maybe in 1 or 2 cat households the problems aren’t as great.

    Post # 125
    Member
    4122 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: October 2010

    Can we all please stop repeating and maybe let this thread die?

    For real, the point is made that it’s 

    • painful
    • taking off the knuckles
    • that there’s soft paw stuff to put on them
    • that she can clip them
    • that it can lead to using litter issues
    • that it’s been outlawed in many places
    • that some vets wont do it
    • that there could be aggression issues
    • that there could be no aggression issues
    • that everyone’s cat is different
    • whether or not a cat or kitten is right for the OP right now (for real, she has it, help her don’t insinuate she did something wrong)

     

    ALL of the above has been said over and over and over and over and over again.

     

     

    SHE GETS IT! PLease, let this die. We have 4 pages of people shouting and yelling no. Let it die already.
    Your point has been made. The.. end.

    Post # 126
    Member
    5822 posts
    Bee Keeper

    @Neato Anedo: Citation needed.  (Some of us can post without yelling.)

    My cat is declawed and has never had a problem using the litterbox.  She also never bites.  Ever.  So to try to show causation without citation, sorry, I don’t buy it.  Also, why have only six cities banned it?  Are these also the six most liberal cities in the US?  Why does the AMVA not advocate the ban if it’s so “inhumane?”

    Post # 127
    Member
    2680 posts
    Sugar bee

    I totally get what people are saying about it being inhumane but there I still might consider it when I get a cat – we had a cat and 2 dogs when I was younger, one of our dogs spooked our cat who was normally very laid back and he scratched her.  It wasnt just a scratch on the nose, he scratched her eye and left her partiallly blind.  I have a dog now and I cant imagine that happening to her so if I had to declaw my cat to make sure it wouldnt, I would definitely consider it. We ended up declawing him and he never ever turned aggressive (this was back when I was a kid and it wasnt as opposed to as it is now).

    Secondly, when I get a cat it will be a completely indoor cat.  The same cat mentioned above was mostly indoor but went outdoors too – one night we couldnt find him until the next morning when he came inside and was bleeding because he got attacked by a coyote.  I know there are coyotes in the areas we would move to so I will never have an outdoor cat.

    Post # 128
    Member
    3124 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: December 2009

    oh naangel! I’m sorry to hear about your dog!

    Post # 129
    Member
    5822 posts
    Bee Keeper

    Why do I feel like I’m advocating declawing here?  For the record, I wouldn’t declaw my cat again.

    Post # 130
    Member
    2606 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: May 2009

    I don’t know what the stats are on declawed cats biting more than clawed ones…I too would be interested in seeing them if someone can find them.  Our three cats are declawed in the front (would NOT do it again, but this was more than ten years ago and we didn’t know any better).  I do know that of the three, one of them will bite more readily than most, (our others don’t really bite at all).  I think it’s probably partly personality…if you declaw a cat that is crabby (like my guy), and/or the cat then feel the need to defend themself, they would probably use the teeth since claws aren’t an option.

    Post # 131
    Member
    3124 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: December 2009

    @miss apricot – yeah, as much as i love cats, some cats are just natural jerks! hehe. I’d also like to see the figures, b/c I’m curious, and it doesn’t gel at all with my own personal experience or that of my family.

    Post # 134
    Member
    44 posts
    Newbee
    • Wedding: October 2010

    I’m definetly in the minority here, but I think declawing is fine IF you are smart about it.  Our cat is declawed.  She was an abandoned, very tiny kitten that we found in our apartment complex.  We had to get her declawed considering we lived in an apartment.  We had it done when she was pretty young (probably about 5-6 months old), had it done at the same time as we had her spayed, so she only had to be put under anesthesia once.  We talked to the vet about the pros and cons of the surgery beforehand, and she told us that because she was young and light-weight that the risks associated with declawing were signicantly reduced (If the cat is over 8 lbs, I believe, they have to use stiches, which has a higher risk for pain and complications, but since she weighed about 7 lbs at the time, they only had to use glue to seal up the incisions) Post surgery, we both took a couple of days off work to be at home with her so she could recover properly.  We replaced her regular litter with shredded newspaper for a couple of weeks (which she wasn’t thrilled about, but was still a good girl and went in the box) and watched her like a hawk to make sure she wasn’t climbing up or jumping on things.  She limped around the house for a couple of days and I know she was in pain for a bit (but then again, who isn’t from surgery, be animal or human) but we gave her her pain medication regularly and did our best to make her as comfortable as possible.  Within a week, she was running around the house like the psycho spazz that she is.   

    Our cat is incredibly spoiled-rotten and loved like no other.  I think declawing has allowed me to have a better relationship with my cat.  We really weren’t worried about having furniture ruined (she did ruin a few screen doors and windows, but that’s easily replaced) but she is a very affectionate cat that likes to knead, a lot, even as an adult.  When we first got her, my whole body, including my neck was really scratched up.  It hurts, and I don’t want to have to push my cat away because I don’t want to be scratched when she just wants to cuddle and be affectionate.  She sleeps with us in our bed.  She has no issues using the litter box.  She nibbles a bit, but it’s almost always playful and gentle (she knows when she bites too hard), and that’s only because Daddy likes to rough house.  We’ve had no issues with declawing her.  I’m insulted that some people would call us horrible pet owners who don’t deserve to have a cat simply because we got her declawed.  If you were to come visit us, you’d certainly see the contrary! 

    If we were to get another cat, would we do it again?  It really depends.  In our current situation, most likely yes, considering we are renting a house (and have the craziest, most anal-retentive land-lady).  I know a lot of people would say “don’t get another cat until you buy a house” but our cat has severe seperation anxiety, so we are looking into getting her a companion while she’s still young so they can “grow up” together (Our cat Guinness is about 1.5 years old right now)

    If you want to get your cat declawed, do it while they are young (I would never, ever declaw an older cat simply because it would be too tramutizing to adjust to not having claws when they’ve learned to climb and balance with them), only remove the front claws (so they still have some defenses if for some reason they get out) and to only do it to a strictly indoor-only cat.  It is something to definetly talk to the vet about, and not a decision to make lightly. 

    Post # 135
    Member
    204 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: April 2010

    Glad I’m a dog person.

    Laughing

     

    Post # 136
    Member
    3363 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: September 2009

    I feel too passionately about this to comment appropriately.  But my vote is a definite no.

    The topic ‘Declaw or not?’ is closed to new replies.

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