(Closed) Diagnosed with Generalized Anxiety…might be why I'm crazy :(

posted 5 years ago in Waiting
Post # 3
Member
1059 posts
Bumble bee

I just wanted to say that you are not pathetic!!! Dealing with such issues is HARD and you should congratulate yourself for how well you have done. I see your posts on here and think that you always bring a positive vibe and add something useful to a discussion. It is hard to look for the positive in times like these but it’s there and you’re only going to be more awesome now that this has been diagnosed!

 

Post # 4
Member
2759 posts
Sugar bee

*hug* I know how you feel, I have GAD as well and it’s so hard to deal with. I started medication and therapy in August before I met SO, and I was so scared when I told him at first b/c I was afraid he’d be freaked out. But he helps ground me – and I’m sure that’s what your SO does as well. The best thing you can do is get diagnosed and start treating it. Things will get better, and I know you regret stuff that happened in the past but all you can do is move forward. I’m sure your engagement period will be wonderful πŸ™‚

Post # 5
Member
451 posts
Helper bee

You are not crazy!  Anxiety is really common.  I didn’t have GAD, but I did have social anxiety disorder for a while.  The good news is that you know what it is, now!  That means you can do something about it.  You can learn techniques to let go of anxiety and even get prescribed something to help along the way.  You can take control of it!  I’m sure you also know plenty of people who have had anxiety before who can be a great support for you, too.

Post # 6
Member
3583 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

@newcitylights:  It’s not pathetic!!  I suffer from the following: major depression (although this lifted fairly quickly after anti-dep), GAD, panic attacks, and possibly ADHD.

I went and had Reiki done yesterday and let me tell you – it was AMAZING.  She basically read me like a book and told me that I was hanging onto other people’s energy and when I left, I had zero anxiety – and I hadn’t even taken any anxiety meds yesterday.  Check out alternative medicine, I have also heard accupuncture works great for anxiety too.  πŸ™‚

If they want to put you on anti-depressants as a more long term approach to treat your anxiety, listen to your body.  I found that the lowest dose was PERFECT for relieving anxiety and didn’t make me feel like a zombie/still had my personality.  Good luck and welcome to the crazy club!  πŸ˜‰

Post # 8
Member
8882 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

GAD is actually very common, I suffer from it as well. You are not pathetic, you are absolutely normal.

I’ve been on 2 medications for it, currently not on any. I’m at a point in my life where I’m happy and wanted to manage it on my own. It helps talking to others who are in the same boat πŸ™‚

Post # 9
Member
333 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2014

@newcitylights:  You are definitely not alone! I have suffered from anxiety for 20 of my 30 years. It’s hard at times, but you make it through. I’m confident that with knowledge of it and a support system, you’ll make it through too!

I hear you on not enjoying the now. That’s always been one of my hardest battles. I remember wishing college away so I could be “happy.” 8 years later, and I’m still wishing things away instead of living through them. Always waiting for the time when it’s good and happy and settled.  It’s a hard lesson. It’s hard to be happy in the now, but it’s the only way. And sooo hard to accept when you have anxiety.

Please hang in and know the bee, among others, are here to support. Best of luck to you!

Post # 10
Member
5242 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: April 2013

I suffer from severe panic attacks and anxiety and have been thinking about going on meds for it. I feel like I’m not able to manage it very well when something stressful is going on in my life or a major event. I also have irrtable bowel syndrome and the anxiety makes that worse as well! I know how sucky it is too feel out of control of your self and your actions because of how you feel

Post # 11
Member
5883 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: October 2010

@newcitylights:  Yeah you need to find a new therapist. Try to find one that does CBT (cognitive behavioral therapy). She should be giving you HW and tools to help you retrain your brain. Here are some books that might help you out

http://www.amazon.com/Healing-Anxiety-Depression-Daniel-Amen/dp/0425198448

http://www.amazon.com/Anxiety-Phobia-Workbook-Edmund-Bourne/dp/1572248912

 

Good Luck, it will get better!

Post # 12
Member
451 posts
Helper bee

@KoiKove:  +1

I agree.  It’s not enough to be told to stop doing something.  I’m kind of surprised any therapist would do that.  It takes more than that.  I was given exercizes and trained on how to combat those negative, automatic thoughts that pop up with anxiety.  Definitely, look for CBT.

Post # 13
Member
966 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2016

@newcitylights:  You’re not crazy and it’s very common. You’ll only do yourself harm by imposing these negative stereotypical titles on yourself. It’ll make it worse and you put yourself into a box. Don’t single yourself out. 

First, you need a new therapist. haha.

Things are okay. I suffered from panic attacks for a LONG time and I generally just… obsess, and I’m an anxious person. You know what helps? “It doesn’t matter.” haha. Most people don’t think as much as we do about nothing; they don’t obsess, don’t care. These thoughts… can you control the things you think about, or can do anything about them? How would these things affect you? Typically, they don’t matter. If you’re not sure, try to analyze them and figure out whether that makes sense or not. Like maybe you’re obsessed that all bread will make you fat, and you can’t eat any bread. Is there any merit to that? Maybe some research will help. 

What about work?

What about his ex?

Maybe you can talk to him about the ex stuff, depending on what it is, and break down what is causing your thoughts. 

Most of the things that we obsess about just don’t matter that much. It’s not the end of the world, no matter what. You have to remember “It’ll be fine.” 

Damage is done. Can’t do anything about it except try to learn from your mistakes. If you obsess/freak out and get into this cycle, you will do more damage. You have to remember that it’ll be okay. Try to think before you act… it’ll help with regretting your actions.

Good rule of thumb… if you’re feeling crappy about not being engaged or want to lash out at him, wait a day or two. If it doesn’t pass in two days, you should be cool and collected enough to discuss it instead of lashing out at him. Acting on feelings alone is dangerous. If he asks what’s wrong, explain calmly what is going through your head, and that you’re trying to let those thoughts go and not entertain them. 

Another thing to think is to sort your obsessions into things you can somehow control and things you can’t control. Another is, what are you obsessing about? Are you obsessing because something isn’t right, or because you’re afraid of something, or because you can’t figure it out? Start disecting these thoughts and obsessions; break them down. Keep asking yourself “why?” when they come up… it  might help.

For instance. “I’m crazy! I’ll have problems forever because I’m crazy!”

Why do you assume you’re crazy? What makes crazy? Was Einstein crazy? What’s so bad about being crazy, if you are? If someone else had an anxiety disorder, would you think THEY were crazy?

Stuff like that… 

And get a new therapist. lol 

Post # 14
Member
7651 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2012

@newcitylights: I was diagnosed with GAD as well. I have not seen my therapist in about 5 years. I can’t say that every day is easy, but I have mine under control to the point where I can live comfortably and normally. My therapist recommended a book for me called The Anxiety Cure: An Eight-Step Program for Getting Well by Robert DuPont. It was a great read about what anxiety is and how to think of it when you start to feel anxiety. It really helped me inbetween sessions. There are also exercises to do in it.

I wanted to add that when you read it you may find it kind of lame because their strategy is the dragon and the wizard. I was really put off at first, but I swear it works as long as you want it to work.

Good luck and relax πŸ™‚

Post # 15
Member
559 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2014

@WillyNilly:  Oh, man, accupuncture does wonders for anxiety.  It makes you stop, slow down, and really feel your energy, where you’re directing it, where it’s going.  Yoga’s helpful, too, in the same kind of way.  

I have a lot of anxiety problems, having been diagnosed with GAD and SAD, and I’ve managed to avoid meds for a few years now with alternative medicine, good diet, and keeping up with CBT techniques.  It’s doable!

Post # 16
Member
377 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

I have had major anxiety problems also. Shrink didn’t seem to help me much. Antidepressants kind of do. If I could take klonopin forever, that would be great, but of course you can’t. What helped me tremendously is when I realized much of my disordered thinking came about because of a dysfunctional childhood. Keep in mind, most people think the way they were raised is normal, it is all we know. Sooo, how did I figure this out. I read a book called “Thaw, Freedom from Frozen Feelings”. I know it sounds kooky, but oh man does it work. The book teaches you how to retrain your brain. Basically you reprogram yourself from thinking the world is dangerous, scary, place. That people are out to get you, can’t be trusted etc., to feeling more safe, confident, and happy. It WORKED for me! Best of luck!

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