(Closed) Diamond or Moissy?

posted 7 years ago in Rings
  • poll: Diamond or Moissanite?
    diamond : (333 votes)
    63 %
    moissy : (177 votes)
    33 %
    neither...different stone : (20 votes)
    4 %
  • Post # 167
    Member
    340 posts
    Helper bee

    If it was a naturally occurring moissanite then I’d be in because it would be so unique and rare. 

    To me a lab stone is a lab stone. A lab created moissanite is essentially a better version of a cubic zirconia. Diamond simulants have come a long way recent years. 

    I also worry about the value of a moissanite 30, 40, 50 years down the track. Will they become as cheap and mass produced as a CZ and other diamond simulants? There is a strong possibility. 

    Post # 168
    Member
    327 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: August 2013

    To the PPs who state their reasons for choosing moissy due to ethical reasons, do you ensure that all things that you consume and purchase are ethically sourced?

    Post # 169
    Hostess
    9754 posts
    Buzzing Beekeeper
    • Wedding: March 2014 - Chicago, IL

    @milesandbos:  Actually, diamonds aren’t as rare and valuable as you think. DeBeers has millions of diamonds stock piled in a vault so that they don’t flood the market. This info is widely available on the interwebz but if you would like an article to read about it I can send you one. 

     

    @imabridesmaid:  For me I try to do my part when it comes to the environment. It’s not physically possible to live in America and make sure everything I own is ethically sourced. Yes I own things that were made in China. Yes the stuff inside my electronics that I rely on so heavily probably came out of a mine in Africa. I didn’t think I was going to save the world when I got a moissanite, but it makes me feel personally better about my ring. 

    Post # 170
    Member
    8439 posts
    Bumble Beekeeper
    • Wedding: April 2013

    @imabridesmaid:  I didn’t purchase my moissy solely for “ethical” reasons, in fact I chose it mainly for superficial reasons lol, but here’s my list:

    • recycled metals: my ring was made by melting down another piece of jewelry and reusing those components
    • upcycle: my wedding centerpieces were made using trash items (old pickle jar, disposable salad dressing cup, cardstock scraps, etc), same thing for jewelry, wedding programs, giftboxes, cards, etc.
    • don’t support bad businesses: my husband and I NEVER shop at walmart, purchase mars candy (they do animal testing), or support a business that we know has bad practices.  We purchase cruelty free products, and support companies that use fair trade.
    • limit chemicals: I don’t wear make-up, use hair styling products or dyes
    • grow food: this not only saves us money, but is pesticide/chemical free
    • recycle: cell phones (we send ours to the San Diego Zoo & Wild Animal Park), we purchased in a community that offers recycling pick up

    Unfortunately, being in a capitalistic society means that we probably will always consume more than we need.  We do not do these things because we think that the world will become a better place; this is just how we choose to live.  I’m sure there are other things we could do, such as eat lower on the food chain, but quite frankly, I just don’t see the point.

    Post # 171
    Member
    327 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: August 2013

    @housebee:  

     

    Didn’t know that about Mars…they’re gone from my list!  Tell me they don’t make Reese’s…

    Sorry, this is getting OT.

     

    Post # 172
    Member
    117 posts
    Blushing bee
    • Wedding: August 2000

    I believe in palladium, among the reasons is that it is used for catalytic converters.  As for diamonds and moissanite, each have their draws.

     

    I’m fascinated by diamond patterns and individuality.  Mine is not branded Hearts and Arrows, but has enough optical symmetry to usually show sharp pattern and contrast.  I thought moissanite was going to be available with H and A, too, though.  The facets are crisp and clear compared to moissanite.  It is what my relatives owned, and there is tradition in that.  Moissanite doesn’t fairly have enough history, so can’t quite bring myself to call it a forever stone yet.  Can’t wait to hear the phrase, “I inherited my grandma’s moissanite” becoming more common, though!

     

    Moissanite’s draw is the price.  Probably to an odd degree, I hate worrying, so wearing expense is not for me.  I also like backups for backups, and the idea of something being irreplaceable makes me nervous.  Moissanite also seems to be consistent enough in quality, at least compared to diamonds.  There are duds, but most seem to be on par with each other.  Also, the fire is usually there, even in less than ideal conditions, and love fire!

     

    If I could only have one, it’d be a good diamond.  If not a quality diamond, moissanite!  If they were the same price and no social stigma, that’d be a tough call! 

     

    Post # 173
    Member
    6354 posts
    Bee Keeper

    @FutureDrAtkins:  “Actually, diamonds aren’t as rare and valuable as you think. DeBeers has millions of diamonds stock piled in a vault so that they don’t flood the market. This info is widely available on the interwebz but if you would like an article to read about it I can send you one.”

     Yes, could you please post one highly credible source for this? Thanks. My understanding is that this is a common myth (or set of myths: another version is a boat filled to the brim with diamonds and sunk, for example), spread due to the desirability of this myth, with no factual basis whatsoever. In the past, DeBeers had a monopoly and did engage in a form of price-fixing. The monopoly was disbanded years ago, and a class-action suit has been paid out to those who overpaid due to the price fixing. Considering that DeBeers now only has ~20% of the diamond market, it wouldn’t logically benefit from trying to engage in illegal hoarding, and considering it is now under heavy scrutiny due to its history, it would have a very hard time concealing it, even if it could somehow benefit.

    By the way, you may have noticed that the disbanding of the DeBeers monopoly and stockpile sell-off, and resulting increased market volatility in diamond prices, has caused a signficant increase in the price of diamonds.

    Post # 174
    Hostess
    9754 posts
    Buzzing Beekeeper
    • Wedding: March 2014 - Chicago, IL

    An older article, before the DeBeers split is what made me start looking into diamond alternatives. This is the article: http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/1982/02/have-you-ever-tried-to-sell-a-diamond/304575/

     

    However, in the an article from the Journal of International Review of Financial Analysis from March of this year breaks everything down pretty well, in terms of buying diamonds as investments. The article can be found here: http://ac.els-cdn.com/S1057521913000409/1-s2.0-S1057521913000409-main.pdf?_tid=71bb4e1c-f610-11e2-bba2-00000aab0f01&acdnat=1374856306_86e551b2854b905d4dbc18875428c657

    Although you probably do not have free access to it, so I will copy/paste the abstract:

    During the recent turbulences in the world’s financial markets, diamond companies have started advertising diamonds as a new asset that can hedge against market volatility and be a valuable portfolio component. To put this claim to the test, this article investigates (i) the performance of investments in diamonds of different
    quality grades, (ii) time-varying correlations between the returns on diamonds and traditional asset classes and (iii) the role of diamonds as a potential diversifier in a world market portfolio. Our results, based on monthly PolishedPrices diamond index data for the years 2002 to 2012, show that in this crisis-ridden period, an investment in a diversified diamond portfolio has outperformed a diversified stock market investment. Additionally, evidence on low time-varying correlations to traditional asset classes highlights that diamonds offer some diversification potential. However, further analysis shows that diamonds can only generate economically significant value in a world market portfolio (by either reducing risk or increasing mean return) when rather high diamond proportions are included in the portfolio.

    All-in-all, diamonds aren’t worth much unless they are >1ct. 

    Post # 175
    Member
    8439 posts
    Bumble Beekeeper
    • Wedding: April 2013

    @imabridesmaid:  I think Reese’s is made by Hershey, but I’m allergic to peanuts so I’m not sure.  It makes me wonder what kinds of chemicals Mars is putting in their candy that would warrant animal testing; kind of scary if you think about it.

    The topic ‘Diamond or Moissy?’ is closed to new replies.

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