Diamonds keep falling out of ring

posted 2 years ago in Rings
Post # 2
Member
1124 posts
Bumble bee

jmb0687 :  I know that over time it’s not unusual to lose a diamond from a ring setting. However, the number of times this has happened in such a short amount of time is not normal and seems like your ring is defective. This is more likely to happen with rings that are mass produced. If you purchased your ring from a chain jewelry store and also purchased the warrenty, they are supposed to fix it for free and even replace the ring if it happens frequently because like I said it’s a sign of it not being made right. 

Post # 3
Member
112 posts
Blushing bee

Nah, it sounds like this store has quality issues. I’d look into a new one from another source, to be honest.

Post # 4
Member
480 posts
Helper bee

A couple of factors for the diamond(s) falling out may be the design of the ring and your lifestyle. The more active you are with your hands, especially if the ring is in a delicate setting, the more likely the stones are to fall out. I had a prong-set 20 pt. diamond fall out of an anniversary ring after hitting it against my car door once. After that incident, I was reluctant to wear the ring again. I’ve since been very selective about the ring metal used too. I switched from 14k white gold to platinum, then to palladium, and presently to stainless steel (my favorite, strange as that may seem).

On the other hand, the frequency of your losses seems unusual. It’s also very odd that a wedding (not engagement) ring would not be made for daily use. Wedding rings are typically made to withstand daily wear. Since your ring isn’t suitable for its intended purpose, you might ask the store if they would be willing to exhange your ring for one that will be functional as an ‘everyday wedding ring.’ That’s not an unreasonable request, considering their recommendation was why you made the purchase to begin with.

If being very active with your hands is contributing to the frequent loss of diamonds, you might also want to consider a different type of design and/or metal. Without knowing what your ring looks like, it’s hard to say.

About your husband’s ring….

There are a couple of different grades of Tungsten Carbide. Both are used to make rings, unfortunately (though they shouldn’t be!). Cobalt-free TC is used to make jewelry, like wedding rings, and should retain its shine. A cheaper form of TC is used for industrial purposes, it does tarnish, and it sounds like that’s what your husband ended up with. He was ripped off.

Considering what both you and your husband have experienced, I would question the integrity of the store. Personally, I would be reluctant to invest any more dollars there, request a refund, then shop elsewhere.

I’m sorry I couldn’t be more helpful.

Post # 6
Member
1715 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2009

How disappointing. Unfortunately, Helzberg is one of the many “maul” stores that simply sell jewelry and not actually make anything.  I’m not a legal bee, but by raising you lifestyle and the delicate nature of the ring — they are basically telling you their position.You choose a setting that is too fragile for daily wear. Your defense is, that (a) they did not tell you this or (b) they told you it was durable enough. However, you won’t have much proof other than your testimony. I have no idea how a judge would decide. Online review: https://www.diamonds.pro/reviews/helzberg/ and https://www.complaintsboard.com/complaints/helzberg-diamonds-c187319.html.

Stones coming out of a wedding band could be poor workmanship (prongs not closed properly or too thin) or there is simply insufficient metal to keep the ring from flexing. It is hard to say if a judge would rule ‘buyer beware’ or ‘bad maker.’ If you have the ring, take some pics under a loupe and see what is going on. If the band is pave and under 1.9 mm, you will always have this issue to a greater or lesser extent. If the ring is thick enough (off the finger) that can allow for a narrower band. All I can say is that the current design trend of ‘delicate’ is not doing anyone except unreliable jewelers any favors. Many high-end makers actually make you sign a waiver if you insist on a setting that they have durability concerns with. These rings are from Herlzberg’s website and they are 1.2 mm wide, even the shared prong. That is totally insane. They will not survive daily wear. 

comparebands

By comparison, Whiteflash’s rings like these are 1.8 mm. WF’s version of the ring on the left has taller walls up to the prongs (more metal). WF’s version of the ring on the right has thicker walls along the pave. But, they are still .6 mm wider…that is a huge amount more metal to keep the ring from flexing and twisting (thus the stones popping out). 

Regardless of any legal outcome, I would not give them a penny of money it fix or repair the ring. It is time to look elsewhere for a setting that will last over the long haul. If you post what you have, we can point in the right direction. 

Post # 8
Member
1299 posts
Bumble bee

jmb0687 :  My Fiance bought my ring from Costco and it is pave and less than 2mm wide.  I really wish he would have let me pick it out myself as I know this ring is delicate, even though it’s platinum. But he wanted the ring to be a suprise, and while i think it’s sweet, he didn’t know about the thiness and pave issue.  What I’m going to do is solder my rings together once I get my wedding band.  That will make the entire ring thicker and hoepfully more durable.

Is that something you can do?

Post # 9
Member
480 posts
Helper bee

jmb0687 :  In answer to your question about small claims court, I can say “almost.” I really do feel for what you’re going through and fully know how frustrating the experience must be. I was there before.

Appx 20 years ago, I had a platinum ring with a princess cut diamond flanked by two baguettes. It was too large so the mall jeweler sized it down to my size. He did a horrible job, and I could actually hear the stone rattling when I got the ring back. This went unnoticed until I got home. The next day, I returned to the store and complained to the manager. He said he couldn’t hear anything. Furthermore, he said (adding insult to injury) that since it was a custom-made ring I shouldn’t expect it to be “perfect.” It had been purchased just as I saw it in the store, so I wasn’t the one who ordered it custom made. I was livid.

Next, I took it to a private jeweler to see if he could determine what was causing the ring to make the rattling sound I heard. He put the ring under a high-powered microscope and was shocked by the poor workmanship. Not only was the center diamond not set right, one of the baguettes had partially popped out of the setting and the exposed corner was clearly visible. The jeweler (who actually did make his own custom jewelry) showed me what he was looking at. He warned me that if the baguette was left as it was, it would eventually fall out. When I told him about my experience at the store I purchased it from, he told me to take it back and demand that it be replaced. Not only that, he told me that if I didn’t receive satisfaction and chose to take it to court, he would be willing to testify on my behalf.

I went back to the store I originally got the ring from, and told them of the other jeweler’s findings. In the end, they sent the ring back to the manufacturer. It ended up being destroyed and re-made. So I guess my message here is that it doesn’t have to be your word against theirs, should they decide not to cooperate. If they refuse to do anything to remedy your issues, I would take the ring to another jeweler and ask that it be inspected for its craftsmanship and potential design flaws. It’s obviously flawed in some way if the stones keep falling out. If you choose to pursue litigation, and another jeweler is willing to back your claim, you may have a good case in your favor.

In the interim, perhaps you can find a substitute ring to wear in place of your wedding ring until this mess is resolved. Better to get it right now than endure another expensive loss in the future. So sorry you’re having to go through this.

Post # 10
Member
1715 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2009

jmb0687 :  Thanks for clarification. But, I still stand-by saying that they are selling ridiculously delicate rings (but, I still put Herlzberg in the ‘maul’ category based on my visits there) wink

quantumleap48 offers some good advise. I’d note that a alot of independant jeweller may be reluctant to offer an opinion in a contested sitaution. But, you could contact a good appraiser and they are usually quite willing (for a modest fee).  

Here’s a link to PS endorsed appraisers. https://www.pricescope.com/appraisers

Post # 12
Member
1715 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2009

jmb0687 :  You might take the ring to another jewller. It may be possible to solder a solid band to one side of the wedding ring.  

If you imagine the plain bands here soldered to the center band, you’ll get my idea. It will look like you have a stack (3 rings), but you have actually contacted the wedding band to the solid band. Just make sure the band is lower than the girdled (wide part) of any diamonds to prevent the diamonds from eating the metal. 

pavestack

pavestack2

Post # 14
Member
1715 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2009

jmb0687 :  Great. Apologies for typos. My son is on my lap “helping” me. 

Post # 15
Member
1495 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2015

I have a shared prong platinum eternity band and have been wearing it for 1 1/2 and haven’t had any issues with my diamonds becoming loose or falling out. Did you resize it? I know that resizing diamond wedding bands (especially full eternity bands) can compromise the setting. Here is a pic of my set for reference.

1456262480925-1329680594

Leave a comment


Find Amazing Vendors