(Closed) Did you choose genetic testing or opt out of it?

posted 8 years ago in Pregnancy
Post # 33
Member
2299 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2010

I opted out with my first pregnancy. I was 19 and had a very low risk factor and DH and I decided not to terminate if there was an abnormalty. We’ll opt out again this time around too.

Post # 34
Member
7899 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: March 2012 - Pelican Grand Beach Resort

I think it’s really important to be prepared to welcome a special needs baby into the world. Many times, children born with chromosomal abnormalities need special treatment immediately after delivery and those specialists can be on hand to ensure your child’s survival if you know you are most likely having a baby with an abnormality. Plus, you’ll want to ahve already taken steps to start getting support in place if necessary and it may affect how you choose to set up a nursury, your schedule for returning to work, etc. These are things you would not want to be dealing with in the two weeks after giving birth.

Post # 35
Member
1202 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 2012

I haven’t read all responses but you’ll likely hear many moms to be or mothers say they opted out because they’d love their baby no matter what.  As would I… which is why I DID chose to have the testing.  Some genetic abnormalities such as Downs may require immediate medical attention when born… heart issues being just one that MAY require surgery or ICU. 

Which is why it confuses me why parents to be would say they love their baby unconditionally so would chose NOT to be prepared to handle these situations immediately and with the best people do address any issues on hand at birth.

The testing isn’t always done to make a decision to keep or abort. The testing is also a way to protect your baby by having proper medical care and a firm plan in place at the moment s/he comes into this world.

Post # 36
Member
1202 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 2012

View original reply
@mrsSonthebeach:  I should have read all of the responses first… I basically repeated what you said.. LOL oops!

Post # 37
Member
826 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

I had the Verifi test done. We decided to have the testing done because we’d rather have time to process any potential issues beforehand and be prepare if needed. My test came back with typical chromosones, so there was relief. I have to say though, I had the NT scan done AFTER I had the Verifi results and knew everything was ok. My NT scan came back as high risk for Down Syndrome. Luckily we already knew that things were fine, but I imagine I’d have been a mess had I done the NT scan first and heard the results. So it is important to remember the NT scan is just as they say, a screening.

I know lots of people who choose not to do any of the testing and that’s great for them.  I personally would’ve been too worried my whole pregnancy, so I had to have it done. I envy the women who don’t need the reassurance that I do- they have a whole lot less stress.

Post # 38
Member
1621 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

View original reply
@spiced latte:  Just to be clear to the whole thread: In Canada, the “typical” prenatal genetic testing offered looks *only* for chromosomal abnormalities (trisomes 21 aka Down syndrome, 18 aka Edwards syndrome, and 13 aka Patau syndrome) and neural tube defects.  I have no idea how this compares to what’s on offer in the US.  First off, the chromosomal disorders are largely random and there is most usually no family history.  Neural tube defects can have a family history involvement so women with a history are at higher risk.  Also, family history of any other health concers, like kidney disease or heart problems or developmental disorders do not increase the risk of chromosomal disorders and these kinds of conditons aren’t tested for using the Integrated Prenatal Screen.  Some of these issues may be identified on the routine second trimester ultrasound (eg. kidneys, etc) but not necessarily.  

And yes, the details of the ultrasound will always be reviewed with you and if anything at all is unusual it should be followed up.

Even for those who opt not to do IPS, the second trimester ultrasound will almost always indicate that something is wrong, and there would still be plenty of time at that point to have an amnio to confirm and get a plan in place for birth and immediate baby care.  Which is to say that IPS is not your only check-point for screening so it’s not a “speak now or forever hold your peace” kind of a thing.

Post # 39
Member
722 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

we were required to (I think anyways) DD had a few cysts on her brain @ our 20wk anatomny scan. We were sent to fetal & maternal medicine where they made us do the genetic testing before our more in-depth ultrasound. Parts of it was usualful and reassuring, other parts not so much. They suggested an amniocentisis which had a higher risk of something happening to her vs the chance of the cyst meaning something more (trisomny 18 to be exact)

Post # 40
Member
2285 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: Central Park

View original reply
@wandering_gypsy:  I was just giving that as an example for why I would choose to terminate a pregnancy if we knew about a genetic disorder. I know that autism can’t be detected with testing, but growing up with a special needs brother made me learn just exactly how hard it is for them and their parents. He will need someoen to take care of him for the rest of his life.

Post # 41
Member
1238 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

@spiced latte:  I opted out. The more I read about the harmful effects of too many ultrasounds, I didn’t want an extra. And even if the blood work had shown a possibility of something, I wouldn’t have gone as far as an amnio, so I didn’t want the added stress. I wouldn’t have terminated anyway.

Post # 42
Member
247 posts
Helper bee

If I ever get pregnant we will be doing the testing. To begin with I am a carrier for a few genetic disorders and we want to be prepared. The testing is about being prepared and making a personal/private decision as a couple. If your child has Fragile X or Downs you can become enrolled with intervention specialists, save money for the extra care that is required (special seats, home adaptations, etc that are not covered under your insurance). These things often take months if you are not aware before the child is born. I live in Canada and work in this field- the wait times across Canada are outragous. I think your midwifes statement was biased and inappropriate. Some of the things that can be found through the testing can be treated, increasing the overall quality of life for your child. It can also give you peace of mind if you are worried about your pregnancy. 

Overall, it is a personal decision for a couple but I will be having the testing if pregnancy ever happens for us. 

Post # 44
Member
1202 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 2012

View original reply
@spiced latte:  There is no cure/treatment.. however when that baby is born s/he may need immediate medical care.. even extensive surgery… so when deciding, please take into consideration how prepared you want your doctor to be to provide the BEST IMMEDIATE care and prepare for emergency intervention if needed… I’d rather have a team ready to sweep in and take the baby than a “call so and so we need urgent help for him/her!”

Post # 45
Member
1293 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: December 2018

We absolutely will do it.

Post # 46
Member
2195 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2011

I am 10 weeks along and my husband and I decided we would do the IPS/genetic testing. Neither of us are high risk for anything out of the ordinary, young, healthy etc but wanted to have it done for peace of mind more than anything else. My midwife did caution us about the false positives, but also gave us lots of information on the next steps if there is a false positive, and the pros of finding out early if something is wrong.

It is a very personal decision, and I can see why lots of people go through with it, and why lots opt out of it!

The topic ‘Did you choose genetic testing or opt out of it?’ is closed to new replies.

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