(Closed) Did you make or are you going to make DIY invites?

posted 9 years ago in DIY
Post # 3
Member
1573 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2010

Were those suppose to be photos? Try it again.

Post # 4
Member
4382 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: June 2010 - Ceremony - First United Methodist Church; Reception - My parents' house!

Oooh lawd, lady! That post is all kinds of mixed up. :p

To answer the topic’s question though, I’m going to do all of our paper goods. I’m a graphic designer and illustrator, so I couldn’t *not* make ours!

I’m going to pant a master illustration in gouache, scan it, and have them professionally printed. Sort of the same process as the girl that heads Rifle does. πŸ™‚

Post # 5
Member
4382 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: June 2010 - Ceremony - First United Methodist Church; Reception - My parents' house!

Ok, now the post is all fixed-ed.

1. Typically, to get the most HQ paper, you’re going to buy bigger master sheet and cut it down.

2. I’m using a combo of Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop CS4 for software. We plan on using the King and Queen stamps. They’re available on the USPS website if you wanna look at them.

3. For best quality, have them professionally printed at somewhere other than Kinko’s, In My Humble Opinion. Maybe I’m just a printer snob. :p But Kinkos > Home, so if those are your two options, obviously do Kinko’s. πŸ™‚

Hope this was helpful! I also have some great resources for having custom letterpress plates made, if you’d like to undertake that.

 

Post # 6
Member
357 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2009

I designed all of our paper products using Adobe Photoshop (not the easiest to learn for your wedding!) and then printed most of them on our home printed on specialty paper.  I wouldn’t recommend Stardream paper unless you’re prepared for the headaches…but it looks SOOOOO beautiful all finished that I don’t even regret the struggles to get it there. 

I bought some of the paper in regular size and some larger size that I cut down.  The one thing that I did do was get the most printed material out of each paper.  Like part of our favor tags were also printed with our invites since I was using the same paper.  This maximized my paper and got me a lot of bang for my buck!

Good luck!

Post # 7
Member
1205 posts
Bumble bee

Doing it all – ordering big sheets of paper and having them cut at Kinko’s or Office Max – whoever is cheaper.  SisterQ is the graphic designer – she’ll design on her Mac (have no idea what program)

Printing EVERY-FREAKING-THING on the gocco.  Invites, Save-The-Date Cards, Thank You’s, Signage, Napkins, Coasters, …

Ordering envelopes and the pocketfolds

DIY envelope liners.

150 invitations.  CANT WAIT πŸ™‚

Post # 8
Member
155 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: May 2009

i think mrs. Cupcake did a list of the things you shoudln’t forget if you decide to make your own invitations. i think you should check that out. in my case, this are my answers:

  1. Did you buy paper that was already the size or your invitation? Or cut it from a larger sheet of paper? Which is better? i did the second, and i regret it because it took more time to finish
  2. What did you use to design your invitation?

    • Software? What kind? i used Word. very retro, i know, but at the time i didn’t know how to use other programs like illustrator. I also used wordle.net to make word clouds.

  3. Did you use your home printer? A place like Kinko’s? or a commercial printer? my home printer. we made 90 invitations and 90 magnets. This is how they turned out:

Post # 9
Member
155 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: May 2009

*trying again… [attachment=326370,40443]

Post # 10
Member
155 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: May 2009

*and again, but i promise it’s the last time… whether it works or not… "Undecided"

[attachment=326375,40427] [attachment=326375,40428] [attachment=326375,40430]

Post # 11
Member
15 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: August 2010

I am “planning” to make our invitations…

I had a graphic designer make our monogram and thought I was also going to have her design the invites too; however, I found the same clip art on istockphoto.com (just not in monogram form) so I am attempting to make my own designs now. I don’t have adobe illustrator or a similar program so I will either borrow a friend’s or use what I have so far in word.

As for paper, I am using 8.5×11 80# cardstock. The results are usually more precise if you print first and then size down. There are some great online resources like paperandmore.com, papersource.com, enveloperinc.com… for paper and envelopes.

I have found a few different printers online that you can send your pdf file to and they will print and size your invites, then ship them to you. I will probably use my own business quality laser printer though, as I think this is one area that I will try to save costs in. The only sacrifice is, I will have to give up on the idea of having thermography or letterpress printed invitations….sad!

You can order cutom stamps from photostamps.com, for a slightly higher rate, or just ask the post office for pretty postage (just make sure you take a completed sample invite to get weighed before you buy the postage).

I hope this helps!   

Post # 12
Member
2022 posts
Buzzing bee

Yes – joint effort with Aunt and mom.

1. LCI paper for pocketfolds, envelops, and mounting paper.  LetterImpress (by Target!) for invitation card itself, RSVP card, and Reception Card.  The cardstock already had a damasklike design on it so we did not need to add any graphics…such a timesaver. 

2. Word documents.  Simple design.

3. My aunt’s home printer.

I need to take pictures of them!!  We have gotten so many compliments on them.  No one believes me that they are DIY!

Post # 13
Member
1205 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2009

I guess I’d call mine semi-homemade.

I used a Gartner Studios kit, so the paper was pre-cut to the right size. I did use a papercutter on the reply cards, though, because they were perforated and I wanted to get rid of the fuzzy edges.

I just designed them in Word. I had to do some test prints because there was a design already on the paper that I couldn’t overlap.

I used my home printer, a Canon inkjet, and it was perfect. I used dark brown ink and the highest quality settings. The print was as good of a quality as I wanted. 

I did this to save money and have complete control, and it was worth it; the kit plus envelope liners were a total of $27. I only had about 40 invitations to make, though; if it were more I might have done better going another route.

 

Post # 14
Member
161 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: March 2018

yes, i’m going to make the invites.  there are a couple of companies–cardsandpockets.com and limitedpapers.com–that can custom cut the paper for you.  for me, it was worth the price of the custom cut b/c i didn’t want to get all cozy with a paper cutter, no matter how cool they sound.  since we’re getting them custom cut first and it’s 110-lb paper, we’re using the gocco (we can’t put them through a printer).

the other option i considered was buying large sheets of 80-lb paper, putting them through our inkjet printer (although some inkjet printers can do 110-lb paper), and then cutting them.

my friend has adobe illustrator and came up with the design, but otherwise i would have used microsoft word and either found a free image or purchased one to use on the stationery.

Post # 15
Member
166 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: November 2008

I made my own invitations, and it was a lesson in patience and letting go for me. πŸ™‚  But I love the end result, and I needed to learn those lessons anyway!

The most important piece of advice I can give you: START EARLY. NOT KIDDING.

To answer your specific questions:

  1. Did you buy paper that was already the size or your invitation? Or cut it from a larger sheet of paper? Which is better? We bought larger sheets and cut down.  I liked this because of the design flexibility it gave me, but it was a lot of work.  Each piece required 6-8 cuts because of our design, x 4 pieces x 75 invites = A LOT.  Try to limit the number of cuts you have to make. I did buy my envelopes from Cranes, because I was in love with a particular size.
  2. What did you use to design your invitation?

  3. Did you use your home printer? My husband built me a letterpress!  it was insane.  It was very hard to use and every invitation looked different.  This is where the letting go part came in. πŸ™‚

You didn’t ask about cost, but I’ll tell you mine were not cheap.  Now, they were a lot less expensive than if I had ordered the exact same package from a custom letterpress printer, but they were a lot more expensive than some of the cheaper thermongraphy printers out there.

There are definitely easier (and cheaper) ways to do DIY, and I would encourage you to experiment before making a decision.  I think it adds such a personal touch to your wedding!  Good luck!

Post # 16
Member
1135 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2010

@ MexicanGirl: Those are freaking awesome!! I love them!

To the post, I am making my own. I started from a very plain kit and then added a two color stamp motif. I also bought outer envelopes and simple response card “sets” (4bar cards & envelopes from Michael’s card making aisle), those elements will bring in more color.

As far as software, I simply designed them in word. Nothing special to it. The harder parts are getting the margins and layout right, but only the text is being printed and that will be in black ink. The color all comes from paper and stamps.

I have a board post about them, and they are in my bio! The small scalloped green card is going to be the RSVP card, but it’s a work in progress. I plan to print and assemble before the end of the year, when I still have time.

Like so:

[attachment=326424,40447]

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