(Closed) Did you/will you circumcise?

posted 7 years ago in Babies
  • poll: Did you/will you circumcise?

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  • Post # 106
    Member
    5995 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: November 1999

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    HelloBlondie:  If you chop his penis off entirely, his chances of an STD are even lower.

    Obviously I’m being facetious, but if it’s about STDs or penile cancer, surely the correct thing is for him to decide when he’s an adult.

    Meanwhile, there seems to be an issue decreasing sexual pleasure. It’s not clear how much, but I think the only people who can really answer that are uncircumcised males.

    Post # 107
    Member
    7570 posts
    Bumble Beekeeper

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    HelloBlondie:  Please do share your source for your penile cancer statistic because I can not find anything anywhere that supports what you said.

    Infact the only source I can find on that point is rebutting it (on cancer.org) 

    Also breast cancer rates are 1 in 3 for women now and penile cancer  rate sits at 1in 600 for uncircumcised men. From your logic your are going to get your daughters breasts removed too right?

    • This reply was modified 7 years, 2 months ago by j_jaye.
    Post # 109
    Member
    416 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: September 2014

    Nope. My husband isn’t circumcised, and I don’t think Father-In-Law is, either. He’s never had any problems with cleanliness, and I don’t see a reason to cut off a part of a perfect little baby when it’s not necessary.. especially when that baby can’t understand what’s happening or consent to it. 

     

    Post # 110
    Member
    13921 posts
    Honey Beekeeper

    http://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/Pages/New-Benefits-Point-to-Greater-Benefits-of-Infant-Circumcision-But-Final-Say-is-Still-Up-to-parents-Says-AAP.aspx

    “Since the last policy was published, scientific research shows clearer health benefits to the procedure than had previously been demonstrated. According to a systematic and critical review of the scientific literature, the health benefits of circumcision include lower risks of acquiring HIV, genital herpes, human papilloma virus and syphilis. Circumcision also lowers the risk of penile cancer over a lifetime; reduces the risk of cervical cancer in sexual partners, and lowers the risk of urinary tract infections in the first year of life.” 

    What’s barbaric IMO is  comparing the removal of a loose flap of external  skin to female circumcision. In the hands of an experienced doctor, the baby is numbed topically and experiences no big  trauma. Quite often they don’t cry at all. 

    Post # 111
    Member
    39 posts
    Newbee
    • Wedding: December 2014 - The Boatshed Restaurant

    No, we won’t circumcise if we have a son.

    It’s not recommended, not the cultural norm, nor will it make his penis more or less attractive. It’s a penis…none of them are particularly pretty!

    Someone earlier compared circumcision with tonsillectomy…apples and oranges. Your tonsils would have been removed for medical reasons (e.g. recurrent illness). If a boy ends up with recurrent infection or retraction problems, if medically indicated, then yes I would agree to have my child circumcised. Also if he was old enough to make the decision and would prefer to be circumcised, I’ll support that too.

     

    Post # 112
    Member
    495 posts
    Helper bee

    In Australia, the State where I am from does not even perform circumcisions anymore, unless it is for medical reasons!! Therefore it is not very common at all where I live.   My husband and I are against circumcision, therefore we wouldn’t do it.  I have looked after a few paediatric patients who required it for medical purposes and the poor little things are in great amounts of pain once they return from theatre.  When working in paediatrics we didn’t have very many emergency cirmumcisions.    I also look after elderly patients a lot, and most are good at pulling back their foreskins and cleaning the area.  The ones that come in with the cottage cheese look are unkempt all over and usually end up in nursing homes, or recieve on going daily services for personal care.  It is not hard to pull it back and clean it! – I have to do it all the time to patients in my job!! LOL 😉

    Post # 114
    Member
    7570 posts
    Bumble Beekeeper

    From the NHS Policy on Circumcision 2013: Circumcision is considered a low priority treatment and will only be provided for a small number of therapeutic reasons.

    From the Royal Australasian College of Physicans Policy Statement 2010 : “After reviewing the currently available evidence, the RACP believes that the frequency of diseases modifiable by circumcision, the level of protection offered by circumcision and the complication rates of circumcision do not warrant routine infant circumcision in Australia and New Zealand.” This has been a consistant policy statement since 1973. 

    The British Medical Association statement: 

    “Unnecessarily invasive procedures should not be used where alternative, less invasive techniques, are equally efficient and available. It is important that doctors keep up to date and ensure that any decisions to undertake an invasive procedure are based on the best available evidence. Therefore, to circumcise for therapeutic reasons where medical research has shown other techniques to be at least as effective and less invasive would be unethical and inappropriate. “Male circumcision in cases where there is a clear clinical need is not normally controversial. Nevertheless, normal anatomical and physiological characteristics of the infant foreskin have in the past been misinterpreted as being abnormal. The British Association of Paediatric Surgeons advises that there is rarely a clinical indication for circumcision. [Go to reference 5] Doctors should be aware of this and reassure parents accordingly.”

    Canadian Paediatric Society 1996-  CPS recommends that “Circumcision of newborns should not be routinely (i.e.,in the absence of medical indication) performed.” 

    Finland, Norway, Netherlands, South Africa, Sweden, Denmark, Iceland, Bulgaria, Ireland,  and German all have similar policies. 

    It is also encouraging to read that some countries are pursuing legal changes to ban circumcision (Australia, Canada, UK) for non-medical reasons due to it being a human rights violation.

    There is also a lot of psychological research being conducted (Australia, Demark, UK) around men feeling violated by their parents choice to circumcise.

    But of course American thinking is the only right thinking. The rest of the free thinking world must be wrong.  And the US still continues to wonder why people from other countries shake their heads at them. 

     

     

    • This reply was modified 7 years, 2 months ago by j_jaye.
    Post # 115
    Member
    499 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: December 2014 - Maui

    Nope, I will not circumcise my son, if I have any. It is not practiced where I live (Japan), and my Japanese fiancé is intact as well.

    I’m actually really surprised so many people here are for it. For some reason I thought it wasn’t so popular this generation because even when I lived in the US, and was going out with American guys, I had only ever seen one circumcised guy. He was Jewish so he had a religious reason. Every other guy I had been with was uncut. Where do all of you live where you are surrounded by circumcised guys?

    Kind of off topic but funny story, I remember when I was in high school and never saw a penis before, I read my neighbor’s Cosmo and there was an article about how circumcised guys have a lower risk of getting HIV and other STDs and basically dissing uncut guys because they look funny. So I naively decided I only wanted to be with a circumcised guy. Fast forward a few years and I became sexually active with my first boyfriend. We were talking about circumcision for some reason and I announced that I hated uncut penises because they look gross and carry more diseases. He said, “Excuse me, but I have never been circumcised!” I felt so embarrassed. Since his was the first one I had seen, and I had only ever seen it erect, I couldn’t even tell the difference.

    Post # 116
    Member
    644 posts
    Busy bee

    Nope, I wouldn’t chop off a bit of my kid. It’s not common where I’m from and is only performed when there’s a medical or religious reason. I’m pretty sure that if you asked a bunch of adult men if you could chop off a bit of their penis, the vast majority would tell you no. 

    Post # 118
    Member
    572 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: October 2015

    I initially wanted to because, honestly, I do prefer the appearance of an uncut penis. My Fiance is not circumsized. We did a lot of talking about it and I also did my research. There is no medical proof that circumcision leads to less UTIs. Sex (not that I want to be thinking of my future child having sex yet, but it’s something ot consider) is more pleasurable for an uncut guy. Less rubbing on their jeans/pants during the day. It’s more sensitive. This is coming from numerous articles I’ve read about men who have had later in life circumcisions and the change they noticed.

    In the end, proper washing education is really all you need. The US is the only country (I think, correct me if I’m wrong) where circumcision is done for nonreligious reasons on such a regular basis.

     

    Post # 119
    Member
    216 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: September 2014

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    j_jaye:  “The lifetime risk for a U.S. male of ever being diagnosed with penile cancer is 1 in 1,437.30 In a retrospective analysis of 89 cases of invasive penile cancer diagnosed from 1954 through 1997, 98% were in uncircumcised men”

    “Schoen published a retrospective review of 5 studies with 592 cases of invasive penile cancer in the United States; none of the cases were in men who had been circumcised in infancy.32

    My apologies. 98%, or 100% in the review. That is from the CDC- pretty reputable source. 

    In regards to the breast issue- I would 100% support my daughter receiving prophylactic mastectomy if she were BRCA positive. I would also receive one myself.

     

     

    Make whatever decision you wish for your family and I will respect that but don’t argue the science. It’s the source twisting and scare tactics of the “intactivists” and antivaxxers that make me and my colleagues crazy. Stick to whatever it is you do for a living and let the medical providers do their job. 

     

     

    Post # 120
    Member
    7570 posts
    Bumble Beekeeper

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    HelloBlondie:  So you base you entire assumption on 1 study. Great scientific methid there.

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