(Closed) Difference between .10 in karats worth the price?

posted 6 years ago in Rings
Post # 2
Member
1030 posts
Bumble bee

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geembee:  you’re correct, there’s not a huge visible difference in size. i used to work in fine jewelry. here’s the thing, a diamond’s carat weight is the entire diamond, not just the top part that you actually see in a ring, so the increase in actual rock finger coverage will be extremely slight because it’s the increase in the weight of the entire stone. For that reason a .85 diamond will not look .1 larger than a .75 diamond. It will be very very slightly larger. Additionally, many jewelry stores approximate carat weight based on samples, because otherwise they’d have to literally deconstruct every single ring and weigh the diamond on its own. my advice? try on a bunch of .75 diamond rings and see if you can find one you like. if you fall in love with a .75 you won’t second guess your choice at all. it’s kind of like with wine. there’s a big difference between a $5 bottle and a $20 bottle, but most people can’t taste the difference between a $100 bottle and a $400 bottle. 

Post # 4
Member
151 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: September 2006

Just went through the same thing, I wanted a 1 carat but went for a .9 because they look incredibly similar and the .9 was a lot less. Fun fact, a lot of the mall jewelry stores advertised carat weight is usually actually a range. For instance, Kay Jewlers, their 1 carat solitaires will be between .95 and 1.01. How many women are walking around with a .95 carat solitaire thinking that it’s 1 full carat? And I bet nobody can tell the difference because it is so subtle. I’ve learned a lot about this as of late since we were trying to decide between the 1 carat and .9 πŸ™‚

Post # 5
Member
639 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2016

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geembee:  my ring size is a 3.5 so I can relate. If I could shop again i’ personally opt for a better cut. A .10 of a carat isn’t noticable. One of my diamonds is .10 carats smaller than the other. I usually have trouble telling which is the smaller one. I’ve included the pic so you can see if you can tell.

Post # 6
Member
1627 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2012

The visual difference is minimal, so the cost/benefit comes down completely to whether or not you want the bigger size for “mind clean” reasons. 

Either way, you’ll get a beautiful ring! 

Post # 8
Member
472 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2016

Personally I think .1 doesn’t make much of a difference. 

What I learnt though is that two stones of the same weight or slightly differing weight can look very similar because of the spread. Some diamonds are thicker and carry more weight (i.e. when you look at it sideways it looks a bit thicker and longer) and then you have some diamonds that are spread wider and look thinner – if you work with a jeweler you can always ask them to keep an eye out for one with the biggest surface area – that’s what my SO did – he said there was actually a heavier stone available but when it came to surface area, the one he eventually got was mine as it looked larger and it was the shape was a little more even as well (I got an oval). His jeweler gave him all the GIA certs to compare which one he wanted to see and when it came to the shortlist (See the photo below) the one on top was actually heavier by a tiny bit but the surface area was smaller). 

*Sorry I don’t know the technical terms to describe the surface area etc but you get what I mean right? πŸ™‚ 

 

Post # 9
Member
472 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2016

Also! Sorry before I forget – you can also look at antique rings if you like that style or want to do something different. Rose cut diamonds are truly to die for!! 

Google: Gemstone Gypsy and Jewelsbygrace and sunny bond jewelry. They are all on instagram and also have websites. 

Some of their 1 carat rings are super affordable and so beautiful I almost wish I had found the sites before he proposed haha. Happy ring shopping! 

Post # 10
Member
1030 posts
Bumble bee

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geembee:  I agree with your jeweler. The difference between a D, E, and F diamond can typically only be seen by a gemologist and not by the naked eye. 

I also agree that an SI-1 diamond is high enough in quality for a stunning engagement ring, and that going above that won’t likely be noticiable (except to your wallet), however, there is one gigantic catch. Make sure your diamond “grading” was done by either (preferably) GIA, or at the very least AGS or EGL USA. 

Diamonds aren’t like food so there aren’t a ton of regulations on what you can say a certain stone is. If you’re paying for an SI-1 diamond and you want to make sure it’s actually an SI-1 diamond it’s important to know who gave it that grade. Many wholesale type diamond sellers (the kind that sell to mass market mall stores) grade their own diamonds. Obviously it’s in their best interest to say a diamond is higher quality than it is, and often they do exactly that. 

As long as your jeweler has the paperwork for the diamond I say go ahead and trust them. Sounds like they’re not trying to massively upsell you and they’re giving you good advice.

Also, not sure of your cut preferences but in my experience the actual cut of the diamond has far more to do with how large/sparkly it looks than minor size differences. If you’re looking for maximum sparkle you probably want round brilliant cut. 

Post # 12
Member
1030 posts
Bumble bee

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geembee:  no problem!!! congrats on making the savvy choice πŸ˜‰ i’m sure you’ll be posting pics of your beauty soon!

ETA: oh, and one other thing. if you love platinum and that’s what you want that’s totally fine, but don’t believe the hype that you “need” platinum for durability. i personally have 18k white gold rings that are nearly 100 years old and they still look gorgeous. don’t get upsold on the metal unless platinum is what you really want. 

  • This reply was modified 5 years, 9 months ago by mrshomemaker.
Post # 13
Member
2327 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2015

The recommendation of the jeweller is sound advice. I agree it’s worth looking at some vintage rings before you make the decision – Leigh Jay Nacht have gorgeous pieces. You get more when you go vintage and it saves you from wondering if your stone is a blood diamond.

I’ll add that when you’re new to diamond shopping you can get a bit too bogged down with the four C’s. F is colourless but HIJ are all nearly colourless and you wouldn’t be able to tell the difference on your finger unless you’re very colour sensitive. If you go nearly colourless then you’ll likely be able to afford a higher carat weight. 

Happy hunting!

Post # 14
Member
1520 posts
Bumble bee

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geembee:  The only time I have seen a significant difference visually in this kind of carat scale is with my heart diamond. She is a shallow diamond so she has been cut to be top heavy so that carat weight does make her appear larger. She is a 0.5 but I held her up to a 0.4 from another store and there was a big visual difference, mine appears more like a 0.65-0.70 that her actual carat weight. So on some occasions yea dimensions do play an important role. 

Have you managed to see these two stones in person? 

I think the F colour is a fantastic colour and its going to look very white without paying the premium of higher. 

The clarity… Yes a SI1 can be eye clean but I’ve also seen some with very obvious inclusions, I would want to know where they were and what types. I’ve even seen some VS ones that usually promise eye clean can show inclusions or have bad location inclusions. For example if it’s got a cloud inclusion right at the surface and in a bad location. I would check the papers on where they are and inspect the diamond. Mine has white inclusions that are really hard to see even with some magnification yet is considered a vs2, one step above that. 

Also keep in mind that buying a stone online can be a lot cheaper and can give you a bigger selection, can get a better stone for your money.

Post # 15
Member
3014 posts
Sugar bee

There is a site called http://www.diamdb.com where you can compare diamond weights and alter finger sizes so that you can see what a particular carat weight diamond would look like on your finger.

Have a play.

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