(Closed) dinner prayer

posted 6 years ago in Reception
Post # 3
Member
8882 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

I like what you are thinking about doing. It’s a simple form of grace. Anyways, it’s your day, do it the way you want to. 

Post # 4
Member
5075 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: October 2012

 

Heavenly Father, we ask you to bless this food and those who prepared it and those who will serve it. We also ask your blessing on [bride’s name] and [bridegroom’s name] who have come to you this day to unite themselves to you in love and sacrament, and upon their families. In Jesus’ love…. Amen.

 

If you Google  “dinner prayer wedding”  you’ll find a ton of choices  

Post # 5
Member
857 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2013

I’d keep it as short and sweet as possible, if you have to do it at all. Not every single one of your guests is religious, or your same religion, most likely and making it a long prayer session when people are hungry isn’t the most polite thing to do to your guests.

Post # 6
Member
451 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

@kariface:  That’s a little ridiculous.  If someone can’t sit through a 30 second prayer before a meal, they need to grow up.

Post # 7
Member
857 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2013

@Cheeks225:  I have no problem with a 30 second prayer. However, having been a guest at a wedding where there was a 25 minute, unscripted prayer before dinner, I don’t think it’s out of line to keep things short and sweet, and be understanding of your guests religious beliefs. 

Post # 8
Member
873 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

@kariface:  Seriously?  Why can’t the guests practice a little tolerance?

Post # 9
Member
857 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2013

@starrynight:  

 

I have no problem with a 30 second prayer. However, having been a guest at a wedding where there was a 25 minute, unscripted prayer before dinner, I don’t think it’s out of line to keep things short and sweet, and be understanding of your guests religious beliefs. “

Post # 10
Member
3886 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

I would try to keep it as non-religious but still spiritual as possible, not for fear of offending someone (as an agnostic married to an athiest, I’m not one to say grace on my own but don’t have any problem being reflective and respectful in a setting where someone else chooses to say grace) but rather to be as inclusive as possible for all guests, of all faiths.  “Dear god” probably feels more inclusive to all guests than “heavenly father” does, even though they amount to the same thing.  It’s far better to leave out jesus, holy spirit, buddah, allah, jehova, whoever in favor of the generic “god” simply because the generic term is acceptable to all. And you really do want all of your guests to feel included in every part of the day.  While I don’t think a Jewish guest would automatically feel alienated by the mention of Jesus, I think keeping it generic is a subtle acknowledgement that everyone is included and welcome.

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