(Closed) diy hors d’oeuvres spread?

posted 10 years ago in Food
Post # 3
Member
150 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: December 1969

DIY hors d’oeuvres?   Have you spoken to your caterer and or site manager about this?  Most caterers/sites do not allow outside food, unless in cases of dietary restrictions or for kosher items. I’d double check that first.

Secondly, I’d think long and hard before asking your family members to prepare food on your wedding day.

If you’re only looking to have a simple cold hors d’oeuvre disply, you should discuss options w/ your caterer.  Most will do simple stationary displays very inexpensively.  Think about much it would cost to purchase the fruit and cheese and factor in the time you’d be saving your family and it’s probably worth just haviing the caterer handle everything. 

If you’re worried about fruit flies outside in August, I’d consider a crudite display instead of fruit.

Good luck with whatever you decide! 

 

Post # 4
Member
2292 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2008

It’s actually pretty usual in our family to do the whole reception self-catered or semi-potluck.  Several aunts volunteer to do all the cold food, and then the hot gets brought in from somewhere (actually, maybe the cousins are BBQing out back…)  We are having catering for all our food, because our venue charges either a facility fee or a food and beverage minimum, and the food prices are pretty reasonable.  Cold hors d’oeuvres were (depending on the type; obviously things like cold prawns are more) around $30 for 100 pieces, which is pretty reasonable.  You can also buy cold plates pretty reasonably from Sam’s Club or Costco.  You should definately check on your facility’s policy (and your caterer’s policy) on this to make sure nobody is going to have a problem with you providing food from another source.

Post # 5
Member
508 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: December 1969

If it is something your family is used to/prepared for and your facility/caterer is cool with it, then it may make sense, but do consider transportation, plating and presentation needs.  Depending on the size of your wedding, it may be quite a lot to ask of family members.

Will there be tables set up for these items at the facility?  How will the food be transported and would it need to be kept cool during the ceremony (think anything with mayo, meat or dairy)?  Is there a place to plate the prepared food?  Sometimes you can transport a prepared tray fairly easily, but often to travel well, it’s easiest to pack in containers and plate on site.  Also, will the proposed family members be in any of the family pictures either before or after the ceremony?  If so, setting up for cocktail hour may be tricky on timing.

Just think it through and do what makes the best sense, but check with your venue for sure – there may be some hefty fees or rules against outside food.  It would be a shame if Aunt Kathy’s famous cheese tray couldn’t be used. 

 

Post # 7
Member
1246 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2009

You could present some of the fruit and/or veggies on little bamboo skewers like kebabs for dipping. I was just at a wedding that did that and it was cute.
They also served some cold roasted vegetables and I’d advise against that – it took people off guard. Some sort of crackers with dip choices are always good. If your service isn’t very long, you could probably put out little sandwiches; alternatively, you could keep the meat on a platter in a cooler til the very last minute, then set it out next to buns and things. If you’re worried about bugs, think about investing in some of those domed screen covers that you can put over plates and platters.

Post # 8
Member
2324 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2018

Antipasto platters are always good. Bruschetta with different toppings is always a hit. There is a book called The Do-Ahead Diva does Parties or something like that and she has great tips for what you can do-ahead and what you can’t. I did food for 50 out of that book for a friend’s baby shower and it worked great. I did it by myself too!

Post # 10
Member
402 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: November 2008

yumm…i like the suggestions KateMW and Amysue give. i woudl be happy with those options…..since your kitchen is sooo close, i think you could do your fgruit and cheese idea too….hlpe defray the cost a bit since many fruits can be inexpensive depending on what you choose and where you buy.

 how lucky you are that the caterer is fine with this! i have been twiddling my thumbs wondering what to do during our "cocktail" hour. i am fairly sure that my caterer wont allow me to bring in anything. 🙁

Post # 11
Member
429 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: December 2008

Some easy things would be hummus and pita chips, deviled eggs, some sort of spreadable cheese and crackers (the old block of cream cheese covered in mango chutney), maybe a cold soup like gazpacho.

I’m probably doing this for my whole reception, but it’s going to be mostly hot stuff instead, because we’re getting married in winter. One cookbook suggestion I have is "What Can I Bring?" by Ann Byrn.. it’s geared more towards taking food to potlucks, but each recipe tells you how far in advance you can make the different components, how to store them, and how to transport them. Good luck!

Post # 12
Member
2324 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2018

Thanks! I swear by the Do-Ahead Diva. I will warn you that her food is a little on the bland side though. I always find myself adding spice, but her tips for doing things ahead of time are so worth it! There is a recipe for roasted tomato topping for brushcetta that is so yummy.

Post # 13
Member
2324 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2018

Thanks! I swear by the Do-Ahead Diva. I will warn you that her food is a little on the bland side though. I always find myself adding spice, but her tips for doing things ahead of time are so worth it! There is a recipe for roasted tomato topping for brushcetta that is so yummy.

 

As far as the biggest bang for your buck during a catered cocktail hour, I’ve always thought people seem more interested in seeing something in action, so maybe if you could do an interactive station plus a fruit and cheese display that would keep the price down with not having to have servers. I know that grits bars are very popular here (though I can’t for the life of me tell you why. A big bowl of grits is NOT party food to me) and people always talk about the station, not the passed stuff.  

Post # 14
Member
2324 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2018

Oh and I meant to add that if you’re doing your whole reception yourself and you need cheap waitstaff, try culinary schools if you have one in your area. Usually the students will wait tables on the weekends.

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