(Closed) Do small diamonds on the band has whiteisher look than ering center diamond?

posted 6 years ago in Rings
Post # 3
Member
3688 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

Do you know the specs on the diamond in your engagement ring?

Post # 4
Member
5956 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: April 2018

It has nothing to do with quality and everything to do with light.  Since your center stone rests in prongs, it gets a lot more light from the top and sides and even underneath, the stones in the band don’t.  That’s all.

 

Post # 5
Member
8041 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: December 2013

@angilyu:  Do you mean whitish or a cloudy look?

Generally whiter diamonds are more expensive (less color, so like D, E, F most expensive).

I think the average wedding band has a range of G, H, I, J diamonds (so more color but still near colorless).

Do you have the specs on the e-ring and the wedding band?

Post # 6
Member
2360 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2018

Usually when it comes to diamonds, whiter = better. (Except for some women who actually prefer that their diamond have a little bit more warmth to them! Nothing wrong with that.)

Perhaps the diamond color in your band is something like an E-F and your e-ring is more of a G-H? Either way, as long as you like your set, it doesn’t really matter. 🙂

Post # 7
Member
732 posts
Busy bee

Smaller diamonds just appear whiter than larger diamonds in general.

Post # 8
Member
1715 posts
Bumble bee

Smaller sized white stones always look whiter then bigger stones of the same color grade.

Post # 9
Member
317 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

When we were picking out my center stone for my ering, we ran into that same issue.  I have diamonds on the band, and the original center stone I picked out was a J in color.  I loved it because it was an ideal cut and had so much fire and brilliance, but when the jeweler set it in the setting, I could see the difference in the color of the side stone compared to the center stone and it drove me nuts.  That same diamond in a solitare setting would have been fine because there would be nothing else to contrast.  I know exactly what you’re talking about…if it doesn’t bother you then no worries…if it bothers you, it will bother you forever.

Post # 10
Member
2734 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

I was just wondering something similar about my rings actually. My RHR has small diamonds that appear darker than the diamonds on my wedding band. I think it’s because they are lower quality. That ring was way less expensive than my wedding band but I don’t have their specs. Still, they catch the light and I really love that ring! 😉

Hard to tell in this pic but here it is anyways:

Post # 11
Member
519 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

I think this sometimes about my rings. My center stone is an E, so quite white. But, some days the small stones in my wedding band look whiter to me…I don’t know exactly what color grade they are, but they definitely are lower than E. 

Post # 12
Member
6355 posts
Bee Keeper

I would recommend exchanging the stones in the band for a color that’s approx one grade below your solitare on the color spectrum. It will be more flattering for your solitare. My main stone is an F and my smaller stones are G, that was on purpose. I think they look great together. The little stones look identical in color to the big one at first, but upon very careful viewing, are just the tiniest fraction darker than the main stone. The overall result makes the main stone have extra pop!

You should get some money back this way too, win win!

Post # 15
Member
6355 posts
Bee Keeper

@angilyu:  Oh, this is it then. It’s not the color… even if your band stones are D, they would only be just a tiny bit whiter (by whiter I mean clearer) than your E solitare stone.

Your solitare stone is showing more contrast/scintillation due to its high quality. Cloudy stones do tend to look a dull white no matter what the lighting. Your solitare is probably looking darker in that photo because you are blocking a lot of the light coming in with the camera/your head right in front of it. (Do you happen to have a black camera or lots of dark hair as well? Now that I look carefully, I can see black reflections in the metal of your band as well). I bet the solitare also sparkles a whole lot more than the small ones as well, especially when you move your camera away from it.

The good news is that you can address this by getting wedding band stones with better clarity…my small stones are not a dull white, as they have good cut and clarity. High clarity small stones will match your high quality center stone much better!

The bad news…you will not get any money back when exchanging them because in this case the matching stones are going to cost more. Oh well! I think this blow is pretty much softened completely by the fact that you have a spectacular solitare and will soon have a band to match it! 

Post # 16
Member
2734 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

Ok, I’ll add an update. It did bother me that my RHR had darker diamonds. For sure they were lower on clarity and colour. Anyway, I got another one for just a little more cost and I returned the lower quality one. Here they are in comparision!

Top one is whiter:

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